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Xinhua Yin, Clark F. Seavert, Janet Turner, Roberto Núñez-Elisea and Helen Cahn

nutrition and productivity of orchard trees, and cash costs and returns are largely unknown in Pacific Northwest tree fruit production systems. The objectives of this study were to (1) examine the effects of synthetic polypropylene groundcover in the tree

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Daniel C. Brainard and D. Corey Noyes

) carrot establishment, quality, and yield; 2) weed density and composition; and 3) gross and net returns. The experimental plots were arranged in a split-split plot design with tillage as the main plot factor, compost as the subplot factor, and carrot

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Brett Suhayda, Carolyn J. DeMoranville, Hilary A. Sandler, Wesley R. Autio and Justine E. Vanden Heuvel

effects on crop yield, economic returns, canopy characteristics, and fruit color. Materials and methods Experimental design. A mature ‘Stevens’ cranberry bed in Myles Standish State Forest, North Carver, MA (lat. 41°53′09.74″N, long. 70°41′55.23″W) was

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Esendugue Greg Fonsah, Gerard Krewer, Kerry Harrison and Danny Stanaland

objective of this research was to calculate economic returns using risk-rated budget analysis. Expected returns were computed using a risk-rated method. The risk-rated method assigns five categories of yield and price per pound of rabbiteye blueberry, thus

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Sanjeev K. Bangarwa, Jason K. Norsworthy, Ronald L. Rainey and Edward E. Gbur

, resulting in relatively higher production cost and lower yield and net returns. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective alternative to methyl bromide in plasticulture tomato production. Volatile allelopathic compounds like isothiocyanates (ITCs

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Jayesh B. Samtani, Celeste Gilbert, J. Ben Weber, Krishna V. Subbarao, Rachael E. Goodhue and Steven A. Fennimore

restrict the use of a specific fumigant in a geographical area, among other restrictions. In addition to direct effects on fumigant use, compliance costs are increasing, reducing growers’ net returns. Solarization is a non-chemical approach widely used in

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Etaferahu Takele, John A. Menge, John E. Pehrson Jr., Jewell L. Meyer, Charles W. Coggins Jr., Mary Lu Arpaia, J. Daniel Hare, Darwin R. Atkin and Carol Adams

The effect of various integrated crop management practices on productivity (fruit yield, grade, and sire) and returns of `Washington Navel' oranges [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] was determined in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Seventy-two combinations of treatments comprised of three irrigation levels [80%, 100%, and 120% evapotranspiration demand (ETc)], three N fertilizer levels (low, medium, and high based on 2.3%, 2.5%, and 2.7% leaf N, respectively), gibberellic acid (±), miticide (±), and fungicide-nematicide (±) were included in the analysis. Using a partial budgeting procedure, returns after costs were calculated for each treatment combiition. Costs of treatments, harvesting, packing, and processing were subtracted from the value of the crop. The value of the crop was calculated as the sum of returns of crop in each size and grade category. The overall result indicated that returns after costs were higher for the +fungicide-nematicide treatment and also were generally more with increased irrigation. The combination of 120% ETc, +fungicide-nematicide, medium or high N, -miticide, and -gibberellin showed the highest return of all treatment combinations. Second highest returns were obtained with high N or with miticide and gibberellin used together.

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Jeanine M. Davis and Edmund A. Estes

Stable prices and increased competitive market pressures have caused many staked tomato producers to examine the costs and benefits of adopting intensive production practices such as drip irrigation and plastic mulch. Inclusion of these practices with traditional growing practices often results in a total production cost in excess of $10,000 per acre. In 1988 and 1989, field studies were conducted in western North Carolina to determine if changes in plant spacing and pruning could reduce production costs, increase yields of large fruit and improve grower net returns from staked tomatoes (c. Mountain Pride). Combined data indicated that the greatest early season yields were obtained using early pruning (when suckers were 2-4 inches long) and in-row spacings of 18 inches or less. Net returns per acre were greatest when: 1) plants were pruned early and spaced closely in-row, which increased high priced early season yields and 2) plants were spaced 30 inches apart and either pruned early or not pruned, which increased total season yields. Non-pruned plants had lower yields of Jumbo and Extra Large size fruit, but higher total yields than pruned plants.

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Jeanine M. Davis and Edmund A. Estes

Stable prices and increased competitive market pressures have caused many staked tomato producers to examine the costs and benefits of adopting intensive production practices such as drip irrigation and plastic mulch. Inclusion of these practices with traditional growing practices often results in a total production cost in excess of $10,000 per acre. In 1988 and 1989, field studies were conducted in western North Carolina to determine if changes in plant spacing and pruning could reduce production costs, increase yields of large fruit and improve grower net returns from staked tomatoes (c. Mountain Pride). Combined data indicated that the greatest early season yields were obtained using early pruning (when suckers were 2-4 inches long) and in-row spacings of 18 inches or less. Net returns per acre were greatest when: 1) plants were pruned early and spaced closely in-row, which increased high priced early season yields and 2) plants were spaced 30 inches apart and either pruned early or not pruned, which increased total season yields. Non-pruned plants had lower yields of Jumbo and Extra Large size fruit, but higher total yields than pruned plants.

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Jeanine M. Davis and Edmund A. Estes

Unstable prices and increased competitive market pressures have caused many staked-tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) producers to reexamine the costs and benefits of various production practices. In 1988 and 1989, field studies were conducted to determine if changes in plant in-row spacing and pruning could reduce production costs, increase yields, and improve grower net returns of staked `Mountain Pride' tomatoes. In both years, early-season yields were highest using early pruning (when lateral shoots were 5 to 10 cm long) or delayed pruning (when lateral shoots were 30 to 36 cm long) and in-row spacings ≤46 cm. In 1988, total-season yields per hectare of pruned plants increased as in-row spacing decreased. For nonpruned plants, however, total-season yields were high at all spacings. In 1989, total-season yields were lower from delayed-pruned plants than from nonpruned plants and there was little yield difference due to in-row spacing. In both years, nonpruned plants produced low yields of fruit >72 mm in diameter but their total yields were greater than those of pruned plants. Net returns per hectare, calculated from combined data of both years, were highest when 1) plants spaced closely in-row were pruned early and 2) plants were spaced 46 to 76 cm apart and either pruned early or not pruned.