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Shahrokh Khanlzadeh, Robert Pelletler, Michel J. Lareau, and Deborah Buszard

Sixteen commercially grown strawberry cultivars with different degrees of resistance to red stele were evaluated for yield, plant characteristics and fruit quality. `Bounty', `Midway', and `Sparkle' had sufficient interior and exterior fruit color, good to satisfactory flavor and suitability for freezing. However, these cultivars as well as `Redcoat' lacked sufficient fruit firmness. `Bounty', `Redcoat', `Redchief and `Sparkle' had the highest yield in the three-year test. `Annapolis', `Earliglow' and `Scott' had reflexed calyx whereas `Allstar', `Annapolis', `Cornwallis', `Earllglow', `Guardian' and `Sunrise' were characterized by a raised neck suitable for mechanical dehulling. `Sunrise' appeared to be the only cultivar free of leaf scorch and leaf spot. `Tristar', `Redchief, `Lester', `Darrow' and `Arking' roots had the lowest incidence of red stele when planted in a naturally-infested field. No relationship between fruit characteristics was observed which suggests the necessity to examine each Individual tralt.

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K.S. Lewers, J.M. Enns, S.Y. Wang, J.L. Maas, G.J. Galletta, S.C. Hokanson, J.R. Clark, K. Demchak, R.C. Funt, S.A. Garrison, G.L. Jelenkovic, G.R. Nonnecke, P.R. Probasco, B.J. Smith, B.R. Smith, and C.A. Weber

Rappaport for meristem culture and virus indexing; Sam Garrett and Mchezaji Axum for assisting with screening for red stele resistance; Wanda S. Elliott for anthracnose resistance screening; Mary Camp for data analysis consultation; and Kathy Haynes, Talo

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Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Martine Deschênes, Audrey Levasseur, Odile Carisse, Rong Cao, Raymond Yang, Jennifer DeEll, J. Alan Sullivan, and Jean-Pierre Privé

`Clé des Champs' is a new June-bearing strawberry cultivar (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) bred for Eastern Central Canada and climates similar to Quebec conditions. `Clé des Champs' was released for pick-your-own and shipping because it has very attractive light red, glossy (Fig. 1), and firm fruit, which have an excellent shelf life compared with `Kent'.

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Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Martine Deschênes, Audrey Levasseur, Odile Carisse, Marie Thérèse Charles, Djamila Rekika, Rong Tsao, Raymond Yang, Jennifer DeEll, Patrice Thibeault, Jean-Pierre Privé, Campbell Davidson, and Bob Bors

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Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Johanne Cousineau, Martine Deschênes, Audrey Levasseur, Odile Carisse, Jennifer DeEll, Louis Gauthier, and J. Alan Sullivan

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Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Bertrand Thériault, Odile Carisse, and Deborah Buszard

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Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Bertrand Thériault, Odile Carisse, and Deborah Buszard

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K.M. Haymes, W.E. Van de Weg, P. Arens, J.L. Maas, B. Vosman, and A.P.M. Den Nijs

Two dominant sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers (linked at 3.0 cM, coupling phase) were constructed for the strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) gene Rpf1. This gene confers resistance to red stele root rot, caused by the soil-born fungus Phytophthora fragariae Hickman var. fragariae. The SCAR markers were developed originally from the sequence of RAPD OPO-16C(438) that is linked in repulsion phase to the Rpf1 allele. This SCAR primer set produced multiple bands in the resistant test progeny and in some of the susceptible progeny; therefore, new SCARs were developed based on the sequence differences among these bands. These new SCARs were linked in coupling phase to the Rpf allele and mapped to the same location as the original RAPD OPO-16C(438). The SCAR markers, as well as some additional RAPD markers known to be linked to Rpf1, were shown to be highly conserved in linkage to the gene based on examination of 133 European and North American Fragaria L. sp. cultivars and breeding selections. These flanking RAPD and SCAR-PCR markers can be used in breeding programs for the selection of red stele (Rpf1) resistance.

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J.F. Hancock, C.E. Finn, and C. Heider

Spaniards brought Fragaria chiloensis when they conquered Ecuador the mid-1700s. The `Fluachi' strawberry, which was developed from these plants, became renowned in Ecuador and was eventually produced or on 500 to 800 ha in the town of Huachi Grande near Ambato. This white-fruited, long, wedge-shaped strawberry is still praised for its firmness, flavor, aroma, and shipping quality. The fruit are produced year-round on plants grown on volcanic, sandy soils in a very dry environment at an ≈3000-m elevation near the equator. The USDA germplasm explorers Paopenoe and Darrow documented the production of the `Huachi' in the 1920s and 1950s and brought it to North America for breeding. Selections from seedling populations were determined to be red stele resistant and found their way into several Pacific Northwest cultivars, although the `Huachi' was eventually lost in North America. Recently, we traveled to Ecuador to re-collect `Huachi' and assess the strawberry industry there. Huachi is still grown commercially in Ecuador, although there are now only 4 to 5 ha remaining. Drought in the 1970s, “tired” soils, and the introduction of the more productive and easier to produce California cultivars have supplanted its cultivation. Ecuador now produces ≈350 ha of strawberries using California production systems. This fruit is exported fresh, primarily to the United Sates, or is frozen in a 4 + 1 sugar pack. We brought `Huachi' back for distribution to interested breeders and to set up fertilizer trials on an established field to try to boost its productivity.