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Hugh A. Daubeny

The indigenous North American red raspberry, Rubis strigosus has been neglected in breeding programs. Only four cultivars, `Cuthbert', `Latham', `Herbert' and `Ranere' provide most of the germplasm contained in present-day cultivars; no more than six individual wild genotypes of the species are represented by the four cultivars. In recent years, the B.C. breeding program has screened seedling populations of hitherto unexploited genotypes of the species from various locations in North America. Useful traits identified in selections from the populations include levels of resistance to 1) the North American aphid vector, Amphorophora agathonica, of the raspberry mosaic virus complex, 2) to several cane diseases and 3) to root rot caused by Phytophthora fragariae var rubi, as well as desirable fruit traits, such as bright, non-darkening red color and easy release. Selections with cultivar potential have now been identified in the second and third backcross generations from the species.

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Patrick P. Moore

Harvest data from the first and second harvest seasons were compared for 264 plots in six red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) plantings established from 1987 to 1992 to determine year-to-year consistency of harvest data. Midpoint of harvest had the largest correlation coefficient (r = 0.81, n = 264), followed by fruit mass (r = 0.76) and fruit firmness (r = 0.47). The relationship between the first and second harvest seasons was weaker for yield (r = 0.33) and percent fruit rot (r = 0.24). Basing the correlation coefficients on genotype means did not greatly improve the consistency of data. Inconsistency of harvest data suggests that selections should not be discarded because of low yields after a single harvest season but should be evaluated for at least 2 years.

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Patrick P. Moore

In our breeding program, harvest data is first collected two years after planting. In order to streamline efforts, some selections are discarded after the first harvest season and attention is concentrated on the remaining selections. Some selections that could become potentially superior cultivars that are slow to establish may be discarded. To test how reliable the first year data is for making decisions, the first year harvest data from five plantings was compared with the second year harvest data. Fruit rot and yield were the least consistent (r = 0.28 and 0.36 respectively) while fruit weight (r=0.76), fruit firmness (r=0.63) and midpoint of harvest (r=0.79) were more consistent. The impacts of decisions based on first year harvest data will be discussed.

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Ann Marie Connor, M. Joseph Stephens, Harvey K. Hall and Peter A. Alspach

Variance components and narrow-sense heritabilities were estimated for antioxidant activity (AA), total phenolic content (TPH), and fruit weight in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruit from offspring of a factorial mating design. Forty-two full-sib families utilizing seven female and six male parents were evaluated in each of two years in Motueka, New Zealand. In a single year, values within individual half-sib families ranged as widely as 25.3-79.4 μg·g-1 fruit for AA, 205-597 mg/100 g fruit for TPH, and 1.06-7.69 g for fruit weight. Analyses of variance for these three variates demonstrated significant parental source variation in both individual and combined year analyses. For AA and TPH, female parental effects accounted for ≈7% to 19% of total variation, while male effects accounted for ≈6% to 8%. A partially pigment deficient R. parvifolius L. derivative female parent accounted for some of these differences. Female × male parent interaction was not significant for AA and TPH and was marginally significant for fruit weight in combined year analysis. Year had a significant effect on the overall mean AA and TPH, but contributed less than genetic effects to the overall variation in all three traits. Interactions of year with genetic effects were not statistically significant for AA or TPH, indicating that between-year rank or scale changes among families were negligible. The largest proportion of variation was found within rather than among full-sib families. However, variation among plots within full-sib families accounted for 12% to 19% of total variation, indicating environmental differences accounted for some of the observed within-family variation in AA and TPH. Antioxidant activity and TPH were highly phenotypically correlated (r = 0.93); their genetic correlation (r = 0.59) implies that substantial additive genetic factors underlie the phenotypic correlation, but that nonadditive genetic or environmental influences are also important. Both AA and TPH were weakly negatively phenotypically correlated with fruit weight (r = -0.34 and -0.33, respectively), but the corresponding genetic correlations were close to zero. Thus, selection for both high AA or TPH and high fruit weight is possible. Narrow-sense heritability estimates based on variance components from combined year data were h 2 = 0.54, 0.48, and 0.77 for AA, TPH, and fruit weight, respectively. These estimates imply a rapid response to selection is possible.

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Ann Marie Connor, Tony K. McGhie, M. Joseph Stephens, Harvey K. Hall and Peter A. Alspach

We determined variance components and narrow-sense heritability estimates for total and individual anthocyanin (ACY) content and antioxidant activity (AA) in fruit from 411 genotypes in a red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) factorial mating design based on 42 full-sib families derived from seven female and six male parents, harvested in 2002 and 2003. Within half-sib family total ACY content ranged from ≈1-60+ mg/100 g fruit in both seasons. The four major ACYs quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography also showed wide ranges each year. Female and male parent contributions to variation in total and individual ACYs were significant (P ≤ 0.001) in combined year analysis, and together accounted for 29% to 48% of the total variation. A substantial proportion of the female contribution was attributed to the use of a pigment-deficient R. parvifolius L. × R. idaeus hybrid derivative as a female parent. Female × male interaction was nonsignificant and contributed negligibly to total variance. Year effects accounted for <2.5% of variation in ACYs and were only marginally significant. Year interactions were negligible. Within family variation (among plots and within plot) accounted for ≈50% of the variation in total ACY and 62% to 69% of the variation in individual ACYs. Combined year narrow-sense heritability estimates were high (h 2 = 0.54-0.90 for individual ACYs, 1.00 for total ACY) among all factorial genotypes, but moderate when the progeny of the R. parvifolius derivative were excluded (h 2 = 0.45-0.78 for individual ACYs, 0.74 for total ACY). The latter estimates are applicable to breeding programs in which pigment-deficient genotypes are rarely or never used in breeding. Parental main effects were significant for AA, together accounting for 19% of total variance; female × male interaction was nonsignificant. Year effects were marginally significant and year interactions nonsignificant; together these sources of variation contributed <2% of total variation in AA. The majority of AA variation was found within- and among-plots within family. The phenotypic correlation between AA and total ACY was r = 0.53, and ranged from r = 0.21-0.46 between AA and individual ACYs; genetic correlations between AA and the ACYs were similar to the phenotypic correlations, suggesting predominantly additive genetic effects accounted for the phenotypic correlations. Linear modelling for AA based on individual ACYs and their interactions explained ≈0.53 of AA variation, substantially less than that explained by total phenolic content (R 2 = 0.88). Our results show substantial variation and moderate to high narrow-sense heritability estimates for red raspberry ACYs, but ACY content and profile information are ineffective proxies and predictors for AA in red raspberry fruit.

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Joseph A. Fiola and Harry J. Swartz

Raspberry cultivars and hybrids were screened for reaction to Verticillium alboatrum Reinke and Berth to determine the mode of inheritance of resistance and to assist in the development of resistant germplasm. Greenhouse-grown seedlings of an incomplete partial diallel of two black, purple, and red raspberry Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus progeny were root-dipped in a mycelial slurry and stem-inoculated with a conidial suspension of V. albo-atrum. Fourteen weeks after the initial inoculation, disease symptoms were observed in the seedlings. Disease symptom severity and percentage of black raspberry parentage in the seedlings were correlated (P ≤ 0.01; r 2 = 0.90). A similar significant (P ≤ 0.05; r 2 = 0.66) linear trend was found with fungus reisolation percentages, although isolation of the fungus from symptomless plants indicates Verticillium tolerance among genotypes in Idaeobatus. These trends, coupled with large significant general combining ability (P ≤ 0.01), suggest primarily additive inheritance of resistance. However, considering noninoculated control scores, the possibility of escapes, and skewing of populations, one may hypothesize a gene-gene model for symptom expression, with partial dominance of resistance alleles.

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C.A. Weber

Lack of variation among black raspberry cultivars is thought to be a limiting factor in fruit production and in breeding improved cultivars. An assessment of the available diversity in black raspberry is needed to effectively develop improved cultivars. Such an assessment was done to estimate the genetic similarities for RAPD markers in 16 black raspberry genotypes and to determine the genetic diversity among these genotypes based on these markers. In addition, the ability to distinguish between the black raspberry genotypes, two red raspberry cultivars (Rubus idaeus L.), and a blackberry cultivar (Rubus hybrid) was determined. A similarity matrix from 379 RAPD markers was calculated, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the PHYLIP suite of phylogeny software, which revealed the relationship among the genotypes. An average of 81% similarity was calculated among 16 black raspberry genotypes with a maximum similarity of 98% and a minimum of 70%. The average similarity between black raspberry and red raspberry was 41% and was 26% between black raspberry and blackberry. Combined marker profiles from six RAPD primers could be used to distinguish between the 16 black raspberry genotypes. Red raspberry and blackberry could be distinguished from black raspberry by 27 and 29 of 30 RAPD primers tested, respectively. Genetic diversity was most prominent in genotypes from the extremes of the black raspberry indigenous range. Diversifying the germplasm pool for black raspberry cultivar improvement can be achieved through utilizing genotypes from the extremes of the black raspberry range and through interspecific hybridization.

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Adam Dale, Patrick P. Moore, Ronald J. McNicol, Thomas M. Sjulin and Leonid A. Burmistrov

Pedigrees of 137 red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) varieties released throughout the world since 1960 were used to calculate: 1) the genetic contribution of founding clones to these varieties; 2) genetic relatedness among them; and 3) their inbreeding coefficients. Fifty founding clones contributed to the pedigrees of these varieties with a mean genetic contribution ranging from <0.1% to 21%. Varieties were clustered according to the genetic contribution into groups strongly related to geographical origin. Varieties developed in the former USSR and derived from `Novost Kuzmina' formed a distinct cluster. The remaining varieties were clustered in groups based mainly on whether they were of North American or European origin. Varieties were clustered also on the basis of Wright's coefficient of relationship-a measure of genetic relatedness. Cluster groups were related to their geographical origin and the varieties within the groups could be traced to similar intermediate parents. Inbreeding coefficients ranged from 0.0 to 0.625 and were related, in part, to the numbers of generations of controlled hybridization from common ancestors. The British group, with the largest number of generations of breeding, had a low mean inbreeding coefficient, indicating that inbreeding can be minimized with attention to the mating system. Strategies are suggested for maintaining and increasing the genetic diversity in the world's red raspberry breeding populations.

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Joseph A. Fiola, Robert Lengyen and Harry J. Swartz

A major objective of the MD/NJ/VA/WI Cooperative Raspberry Breeding Program is to develop new primocane-fruiting raspberry cultivars that are early, with large fruit size, and good fresh flavor, relative to the `Heritage' standard. Step I seedling selections were made and tissue culture-propagated. The Step III advanced selection trial, planted in 1993, consisted of two advanced selections, JCR-F1 [Geo-1 (Autumn Bliss × Glen Moy) × Heritage–red], and JEF-B1 (Amity × Glen Eagles–golden), with a `Heritage' check. The planting was a RCB (four replications), with 3-m plots, 60-cm plant spacing, on raised beds with black plastic mulch (establishment year), and trickle irrigation. The 1994 season started dry, and mid-summer was warm and wet, inducing an early harvest overall. JCR-F1 was >2 weeks earlier, 40% higher yielding, with 18% larger fruit size than `Heritage'. JCR-F1 fruit was tall conic, cohesive, and had good flavor; plant vigor was very good. JEF-B1 was 10 days earlier than `Heritage', had 40% larger fruit size, but was 25% lower yielding; plant vigor was also good. The flavor was described as banana and apricot. The planting will be fruited for multiple seasons for continued comparison.

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Chad Finn, Kirsten Wennstrom, Janessa Link and Jill Ridout

Sixteen western black raspberry (Rubus leucodermis Douglas ex Torrey & A. Gray) populations, collected from through out the Pacific Northwest, and `Munger', the most widely grown black raspberry (R. occidentalis L.) cultivar, were established in 1994 in a replicated trial in Corvallis, Ore. In 1996 and 1997 the seedlings were evaluated for date of budbreak, flowering date, ripening date, fruit size, and disease tolerance. Fruit within a replication were pooled for evaluation of pH, soluble solids, titratable acidity, and anthocyanin content. The plants were vigorous and had produced solid hedges by the time evaluation commenced. The populations were significantly different within each year for all traits except for anthocyanin content in 1996. Rubusleucodermis populations were identified that broke bud and ripened fruit earlier or later than `Munger'; however, all flowered with or sooner than `Munger'. Despite the fact that R. occidentalis is native to eastern North America and R. leucodermis to the West, `Munger' was much less affected by foliar and cane diseases than the R. leucodermis populations. Several populations were as vigorous as `Munger'. `Munger' had fruit that were 30% larger than the mean for any R. leucodermis population. Generally, R. leucodermis had higher pH and lower titratable acidity than `Munger', but many populations had similar soluble solids; lower acidity may partly explain the blandness of R. leucodermis fruit compared with `Munger'. Despite the lighter appearance of R. leucodermis, the anthocyanin levels of some populations were higher than `Munger'. Rubusleucodermis may be a source of earlier fruiting, later budbreak, and vigor when used in breeding but careful selection for fruit size (for the fresh market), acidity (for the processing market), and disease resistance must be done. Rubus leucodermis may also be an excellent source of raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) resistance in black and red raspberry breeding programs.