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Esther McGinnis, Alicia Rihn, Natalie Bumgarner, Sarada Krishnan, Jourdan Cole, Casey Sclar, and Hayk Khachatryan

extension: digital and social media, retail and marketing, and public gardens. Although the workshop focus was on millennials, youth outreach is also briefly discussed in the final section. Materials and methods On 23 July 2019, at the ASHS annual conference

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Mary Hockenberry Meyer, Stan Hokanson, Susan Galatowitsch, and James Luby

University public gardens offer a unique opportunity to showcase research in horticulture and plant science, as well as in diverse programs such as art, engineering, medicine, human nutrition, and information technology. Universities, especially

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Aaron Steil and Robert E. Lyons

Public gardens evaluate a wide variety of internal activities, including job performance, fundraising, and education. As observed elsewhere, these evaluations can conjure up a preponderance of negative emotions, which, when coupled with other

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Min Hyeong Kwon, Changwan Seo, Jongyun Kim, Moonil Kim, Chun Ho Pak, and Woo-Kyun Lee

, 2011 ; Louv, 2008 ; McMichael, 2001 ). As the issue of nature deficiency in urban areas has become more prominent, people have become interested in green spaces and access to natural environments. Urban public gardens provide environmental benefits to

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Sarada Krishnan, Heather Kirk-Ballard, Esther McGinnis, and Lauren Garcia Chance

The National Initiative for Consumer Horticulture (NICH), a consortium of CH leaders from academia, industry, public gardens, governments, and nonprofits ( Dorn et al., 2018 ), defines CH as “the cultivation, use, and enjoyment of plants, gardens

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Matthew S. Lobdell

skilled professionals ( Rogers, 1993 ). Public gardens are one potential source for horticulture internship opportunities. Though public garden internships are often only loosely characterized or defined ( Hird et al., 2007 ), intern responsibilities

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Kathleen M. Kelley, James C. Sellmer, and Rebecca H. Robert

to how consumers view public gardens and arboreta as a resource and destination and how these spaces should structure events, activities, education, and entertainment to best coincide with consumer interests. Thus, public gardens and arboreta can

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Ellen Sullivan Bennett and James E. Swasey

The negative effects of the urban situation on human well-being are well documented, contribute to stress, weaken coping skills, and evoke a negative self-appraisal from residents continually surrounded by bleak settings (Stainbrook, 1973). The following research suggests that urban residents may visit public gardens as a means of coping with the stresses of city life. Results of a survey of urban visitors to two urban public gardens indicate that stress reduction is an important reason for visiting the gardens. The research also indicates a trend of reduced levels of self-perceived stress after a garden visit.

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Matt Stephens, Kathryn Denhardt, James Flynn, Robert Lyons, and James Swasey

Public gardens are complex, multi-faceted, diverse organizations that execute a broad scope of tasks including fundraising, educational programming, marketing, public relations, and horticultural research. This broad scope of work creates numerous challenges for these institutions. One of which is conflict between front-line and administrative staffs. The goal of this research is to help explain why conflict between front-line and administrative staffs exists in public gardens. The research found no existing research on the topic of conflict in botanic gardens, but some in other industries. The research was a mixed methods design, including two case studies at separate public gardens and an online questionnaire. Both case studies consisted of separate focus groups and individual interviews with staff at different levels of the organization. Questionnaire results also came from various personnel levels (front-line and administrative) of public gardens. Once final data collection occurred, they were coded into similar categories outlined by the Malcolm Baldridge Standards, an internationally recognized assessment tool for excellence. Early analysis of the data indicates that conflict occurs due to a lack of: a clear mission and vision, effective communication, and empowerment within the organization.

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Kathleen M. Kelley, James C. Sellmer, and Rebecca H. Robert

Public gardens and arboreta rely on members to provide a stable source of funding and, in some cases, to volunteer their time and assist with facilitating functions and events ( San Francisco Botanical Garden, 2010 ). As evident in several published