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Oleg Daugovish and Kirk Larson

Total and marketable yield, fruit size and fruit rot were evaluated for `Camarosa' and `Ventana' strawberries grown with or without protected culture in southern California in 2003 and 2004. In both years, bareroot transplants were established on 5 Oct. using standard “open field” production methods. Fifty-five days after transplanting, metal posts and arcs were positioned over portions of the field and covered with 0.0324-mm-thick clear polyethylene (Tufflite Thermal, Tyco Plastics, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.) to create “tunnel” structures 5 m wide, 25 m long, and 2.5 m high. Each tunnel covered three contiguous strawberry beds, and experiment design was a randomized complete block with four replications, with individual plots consisting of 20 plants. In 2003, early season (Jan.–1 Apr.) marketable yields in tunnels were 90% and 84% greater than outdoor culture for `Ventana' and `Camarosa', respectively. In 2004, use of tunnels resulted in a 140% marketable yield increase for `Ventana' and 62% for `Camarosa' (Jan.–31 Mar.); however, unusually high temperatures (38 °C) in April resulted in reduced yields in tunnels thereafter. In both years, increased early production coincided with highest fresh market fruit prices, resulting in $5700–7700 greater returns per-acre compared to open field production. For both cultivars, tunnel production resulted in 37% to 63% fewer non-marketable fruit due to less rain damage, better fruit shape, and decreased incidence of gray mold. For all treatments, fruit size decreased as the season progressed and was more pronounced in tunnels after April. Overall, these studies indicate that tunnels have potential for enhancing early-season production and profitability of strawberries in southern California.

Open access

Elena E. Lon Kan, Steven A. Sargent, Daniel J. Cantliffe, Adrian D. Berry, and Nicole L. Shaw

Datil hot pepper (Capsicum chinense) has potential for increased production due to its unique, spicy flavor and aroma. However, few reports have been published related to postharvest handling characteristics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of harvest maturity on fruit quality under simulated commercial storage conditions. ‘Wanda’ datil pepper plants were grown hydroponically under protected culture. Fruit were harvested at yellow and orange maturity stages, placed in vented clamshell containers, and stored at 2, 7, or 10 °C for 21 days. Peppers harvested at yellow stage maintained greater quality than orange peppers during storage at all temperatures. Marketable fruit after 21 days for peppers harvested at the yellow stage was 94% (2 °C), 88% (7 °C), and 91% (10 °C); that for orange-stage peppers was 68%, 74%, and 82% for the same respective temperatures. No chilling injury (CI) symptoms were observed in these tests. Initial pepper moisture content was 90%, decreasing only slightly during 21 days of storage; weight loss ranged from 2% to 8%. Soluble solids content (SSC) was greater for peppers harvested at the orange stage (9.5%) than for those at yellow stage (7.8%). Neither harvest maturity nor storage temperature affected total titratable acidity (TTA; 0.13%) or pH (5.3). Respiration rate varied with temperature but not by harvest maturity and ranged from 12 to 25 mg·kg−1 per hour after 8 days of storage. Peppers harvested orange contained double the amount of total carotenoids as yellow fruit. Carotenoid content for yellow and orange peppers was 58 and 122 µg·g−1, respectively. Capsaicinoid content ranged from 1810 to 4440 µg·g−1 and was slightly greater for orange-harvested peppers. Datil peppers harvested at the yellow stage and stored in vented clamshell containers had better quality than peppers harvested at the orange stage after 21 days at 2 °C.

Free access

Vincent M. Russo and James Shrefler

.23 kg·m −2 . There is little scientifically evaluated information on bunching onion production under protected culture. In an environmental chamber, Broome and Peffley (2005) found that in-row distances of 15 to 20 mm benefitted plant development

Full access

Kathleen Demchak

High tunnel usage for small fruit crops In the past, protected culture including use of high tunnels was used to a great extent in other countries, and to a lesser extent in the United States ( Hancock and Simpson, 1995 ; Wittwer and Castilla, 1995

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David S. Conner and Kathleen Demchak

Strawberry and caneberries are popular crops that can bring revenue to farms and may improve farm profitability. Protected culture provides potential benefits to berry growers. For red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus ), tunnel production has been or is

Open access

Kaitlyn M. Orde and Rebecca Grube Sideman

have not been documented in any published studies. However, they are in line with other research showing the cultivars Chandler and Sweet Charlie produced fewer runners under high tunnel protected culture ( Kadir et al., 2006 ). Total leaf area, shoot

Open access

Kaitlyn M. Orde and Rebecca Grube Sideman

%20technology.Pritts.pdf > Pritts, M. 2017 Protected culture for berries, low and high tunnel research. 15 Nov. 2020. < https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ErlnTZNuxM > Pritts, M. Handley, D. 1998 Strawberry production guide for the Northeast, Midwest

Open access

Kaitlyn M. Orde, Rich Marini, Kathleen Demchak, and Rebecca Sideman

spectral transmission and effects of the films covering low tunnels. Yet, the current selection of agricultural films for protected culture is quite diverse and includes photoselective films, which can selectively block, reduce, or transmit specific

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Maria E. Cramer, Kathleen Demchak, Richard Marini, and Tracy Leskey

canopies had to be scrutinized to find them. Although these results are extremely promising for raspberry growers, they may be useful for other crops as well. Protected culture has been used increasingly for cherry production and other stone fruit

Open access

Craig J. Frey, Xin Zhao, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Dustin M. Huff, and Zachary E. Black

considerations for open-field and protected culture in North Florida. 21 May 2018. < http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/HS/HS127300.pdf > United States Department of Commerce (US-DOC) 2017 DOC website. 8 Jan. 2019. < https://www.commerce.gov/ > United States