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Ramón A. Arancibia, Cody D. Smith, Don R. LaBonte, Jeffrey L. Main, Tara P. Smith and Arthur Q. Villordon

gains and rate are comparatively lower. Table 6. Cost-benefit and marginal analyses of delaying harvest time in early planted sweetpotato production for fresh and processing markets. Discussion The yield response to planting and harvest combinations as

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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil and Robert R. Martin

processed markets. Also ‘Hall’s Beauty’ will need fewer insecticide sprays for spotted winged drosophila ( Drosophila suzukii Matsumura) as this pest only begins to build to problematic levels toward the end of ‘Hall’s Beauty’ harvest season. The primocanes

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Gilbert F. Simmons, Roger Rij, Joseph L. Smilanick and Shama John

Refrigerated fresh-cut fruit and vegetables are the most rapidly expanding area in produce sales. Shelf life for minimally processed produce depends on natural product senescence or spoilage organism decay. Shelf life limits, near-aseptic cutting facilities, refrigerated transportation, and refrigerated storage make it possible to ship precut cantaloupe coast to coast on a year-round basis. Thorough cantaloupe surface disinfection reduces potential spoilage organisms and harmful pathogens. We compared using vapor hydrogen peroxide and sulfur dioxide to the current practice of hypochlorite (HOCL) washing to reduce cantaloupe microbial load. After treatment, cantaloupe were stored in unsealed polyethylene bags at 2.2°C for 4 weeks. The HOCL treated fruit were scrubbed and soaked for 5 minutes in a commercial HOCL solution. After 4 weeks, the HOCL washed fruit had reduced visible molds compared to controls. Cantaloupes fumigated for 60 minutes with 5000 or 10,000 ppm sulfur dioxide developed sunken lesions but no significant decay after 4 weeks storage. Cantaloupes, treated 60 minutes with 3 mg·L–1 volume vapor hydrogen peroxide, did not show injury or significant decay after 4 weeks storage. Sulfur dioxide and vapor hydrogen peroxide show promise as alternatives to HOCL.

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R. Karina Gallardo and David Zilberman

workers ( Georgia Department of Agriculture, 2012 ). An alternative to the industry’s current labor dependence is the successful implementation of mechanical harvesters for highbush blueberries for both the fresh and processing market. However, highbush

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M. Joseph Stephens, Peter A. Alspach, Ron A. Beatson, Chris Winefield and Emily J. Buck

measurements (i.e., fruit firmness, soluble solids, acidity, total anthocyanins and ellagitannins) to develop and demonstrate the use of a selection index for breeding new raspberry cultivars for processing markets. In addition, we set out to study the

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M. Joseph Stephens, Peter A. Alspach, Ron A. Beatson, Chris Winefield and Emily J. Buck

Commercial red raspberry cultivars suited to machine-harvest and process markets need to have a high yield of good-quality fruit that is easily removed during the harvest operations. In the PNW, this has been achieved using the cultivar Meeker

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Emily K. Dixon, Bernadine C. Strik and David R. Bryla

primarily grows trailing types used for the processed market, and nearly all of the fruit is harvested by machine ( Strik and Finn, 2012 ; USDA, 2014 ). Although there is an increasing body of knowledge about organic blackberry production ( Fernandez

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Javier Fernandez-Salvador, Bernadine C. Strik and David R. Bryla

’ are predominantly harvested by machine for high-value processed markets and together accounted for greater than 75% of the 2914 ha of blackberries produced in Oregon in 2012 ( National Agricultural Statistical Service, 2013 ). Like all trailing types

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L. Brandenberger, R. Wiedenfeld, R. Mercado, J. Lopez and T.E. Morelock

Southern peas for the processing market are an important crop for producers in South Texas, but little testing of new varieties or breeding lines has been carried out. Grower field trials during three different years and an on station trial provided an opportunity to evaluate >30 different pea cultivars or breeding lines. Cultivars and breeding lines were evaluated for earliness, maturity, yield, and performance in high-pH soils. Yields varied significantly each season, with Arkansas Blackeye # 1 providing consistently high yields in the three grower trials. Both Arkansas 87-435-68 and Texas Pinkeye produced significantly higher yields in the high soil pH trial at Weslaco. Yields for Arkansas 87-435-68 and Texas Pinkeye in the Weslaco trial were 1428 and 1231 lb of dry peas per acre, respectively.

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Charles Mainland

Mechanized harvest for processing markets has become commercially accepted for blackberries (Rubus sp.), highbush (Vaccinium corymbosum), lowbush (V. angustifolium) and rabbiteye (V. ashei), blueberries, cranberries (V. macrocarpon), grapes (Vitus labruscana, V. vinifera, V. rotundifolia, V. sp.), raspberries (Rubus ideaus) and to a lesser extent for strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa). Fruit bruising during harvest and sorting often contributes to reduced “eye appeal” and keeping quality for fresh sales. Highbush and rabbiteye blueberries are successfully machine harvested for fresh markets, however, high temperature and rain will often make product quality unacceptable. Highbush blueberries grown in cool climates and rabbiteye blueberries with greater inherent resistance to bruising have most consistently given acceptable quality. Cultivar improvement and equipment that causes less bruising during harvest and sorting will be required for increased mechanization for fresh markets. Mechanical pruning of blackberries, blueberries, grapes and raspberries can reduce costs by up to 80%. The audience will be involved in discussion of advancements in mechanization techniques.