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R.G. Linderman and E.A. Davis

aerated-steam treatment experiment, as well as a sandy loam soil, was used for treatments with different rates of metam sodium. The potting medium was placed into 20 × 20-cm resealable polyethylene bags (600 cm 3 per bag) and was moistened with 200 mL of

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F. A. Pokorny and B. K. Henny

Abstract

A standard 1:1 v/v pine bark and sand potting medium was characterized physically by particle size distribution, bulk density (BD), total pore space, porosity at 50 cm H2O tension and porosity at >50 cm H2O tension. A potting medium identical to the standard was constructed from component milled pine bark and sand particles. Phaseolus lunatus L. ‘Jackson Wonder’ plants grown in the 2 physically similar media, under a standard cultural program, were essentially identical. Construction of a potting medium from a prescribed screen analysis provides a means to quantify variation which exists within a medium assumed to be uniform.

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A. R. Chase and C. A. Conover

Abstract

Factorial experiments, including three potting media, two potting medium temperatures, and two air temperatures were used to evaluate growth of Nephrolepis exaltata ‘Fluffy Ruffle’ (Boston fern) infected with Rhizoctonia solani (the causal agent of aerial blight). Potting medium mixtures of sphagnum peat-sand, sphagnum peat-pine bark, and sphagnum peat-vermiculite-perlite did not affect severity (percentage of foliar infection) in four of five tests. Plant quality was highest for plants grown in peat-vermiculite-perlite in two of four tests. Potting medium temperature of 32°C reduced percentage of foliar infection in four of five tests, and plant quality in three of four tests. Fresh weights of shoots or roots were not affected consistently by potting medium temperature at 32°. Air temperatures ranging from 35° to 38° were favorable for disease development, with reduced development at temperatures above 35°. In vitro radial growth of R. solani isolates was optimal at ≈30° with a statistically significant reduction at 35°.

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R. P. Doss, J. L. Paul, and C. I. Lee

Abstract

A calcined shale potting medium is useful to obtain intact root systems free of substrate. Root system structure and shape is retained with minimal damage upon removal from this medium.

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Maria Papafotiou, Barbara Avajianneli, Costas Michos, and Iordanis Chatzipavlidis

and manipulation of the pH is needed to determine the factors that affect red pigmentation and anthocyanin concentration in plants grown in media with CGC. The current work suggests that CGC can replace 50% of peat in a potting medium with perlite

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Mark A. Nash, Tim P. Brubaker, and Billy W. Hipp

Expanded shale and peat moss were mixed in 5 ratios and evaluated as potting media for Petunia and Impatiens. Two grades of shale (coarse and fine) were used. Bulk density increased linearly with increasing shale whereas total pore space and container capacity increased linearly with increasing peat. Air space of peat-fine shale was consistently lower than that of peat-coarse shale when the peat/shale ratio was the same. Container capacity of peat-fine shale was consistently higher than that of peat-coarse shale when the peat/shale ratio was the same. Growth and quality of both bedding plants increased quadratically with increasing peat in peat-coarse shale and increased linearly with increasing peat in peat-fine shale. Highest growth and quality of both plants were found in peat-coarse shale media with at least 50% peat and in peat-fine shale media with at least 75% peat.

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Nabil Rishani and R. P. Rice Jr.

Abstract

Due to the high price of imported sphagnum peat in Lebanon, olive pumace and two types of carob pumace, by-products of local industries, were tested as substitute materials in potting mixes. Their particle size distribution, bulk density, stability, and phase distribution were similar to the peatmoss; both were more alkaline and saline, although still within acceptable levels. Nephrolepsis exaltata (L.) Schott, Pilea cadierii Gagnep and Guillaum, and Hedera helix L. were grown in mixes of the pumaces with builder's sand at 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1 organic material by volume. Olive pumace-based mixes produced unsalable plants, apparently due to a Phytotoxin present, whereas plants grown in media containing traditionally milled or mechanically chopped carob pumace were of equal or better quality than those grown in peatmoss-based mixes.

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Naveen Hyder, James J. Sims, and Stephen N. Wegulo

Coir has become popular as a potting medium in greenhouse and nursery production. Qualities of coir that make it a good peat substitute include high water holding capacity, excellent drainage, physical resilience, and the fact that it is a renewable

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Richard J. McAvoy

Root-zone and plant canopy temperatures were continuously monitored as a poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex JSI.) crop was grown in the greenhouse under warm day/cool night [(+) DT-NT] or cool day/warm night [(-) DT-NT] temperature regimes. Day temperatures were imposed from 0900 to 1700 hr. Light levels photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) and outside ambient air temperatures were also monitored. Temperature differences between the root-zone and plant canopy microenvironments were most extreme during the night-to-day and day-to-night temperature transition periods. The temperature difference between the plant canopy and the root zone following temperature transition periods had been previously identified as a critical factor affecting stem elongation. Overall poinsettia height was consistently shorter under the (-) DT-NT than under the (+) DT-NT environment.

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Charles A. Conover and Richard T. Poole

Abstract

Potting media composed of sedge peatmoss and 50% or less shredded (by volume) Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake bark or the entire tree composed of shredded bark, wood, seed pods, and leaves produced high quality Aglaonema and Nephrolepis in 2 separate experiments. Mixes containing melaleuca bark had high noncapillary pore space, water-holding capacity, cation-exchange capacity, and low bulk density when mixed with at least 50% sedge peatmoss. No phytotoxicity problems were observed from use of melaleuca components in artificial media.