Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • "potato virus Y" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

David R. Duncan, David Hammond, Jim Zalewski, John Cudnohufsky, Wojciech Kaniewski, Mike Thornton, Jeffrey T. Bookout, Paul Lavrik, Glennon J. Rogan, and Jennifer Feldman-Riebe

Free access

C. Avilla, J.L. Collar, M. Duque, P. Pérez, and A. Fereres

Free access

Benigno Villalón

JALORO is a multiple virus resistant (MVR) open pollinated pepper cultivar developed by Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Weslaco. This pungent, cylindrical (fruit with blunt end) yellow jalapeño cultivar possesses high levels of resistance to several isolates of Texas tobacco etch virus, potato virus Y, pepper mottle virus, tobacco ringspot virus, cucumber mosaic virus and tobacco mosaic virus. The genotype combines desirable characteristics of commercial hot yellow wax `Caloro'(TMR), the jalapeño genome from `Jalapeño-L' and Jalapeño 1158, and MVR genes from AC2207 (hot serrano) and PI 264280. `Jaloro' has the ability to set fruit at temperatures above 35C. It has a concentrated flower setting habit, sets fruits earlier and matures more uniformly than `Caloro'. The singlestem plant will support a heavy set of large thick yellow jalapeño fruit which can be mechanically harvested. It is suited for fresh market in salads or as a processed product, pickled whole, sliced as `nacho' rings or diced in picante sauces.

Free access

Roger L. Vallejo, Wanda W. Collins, and Rocco Schiavone

A hybrid diploid potato population (Solanum phureja x Solanum stenotomum) with superior horticultural traits has been developed for breeding purposes. Because this highly advanced population has no resistance to potato virus Y (PVY), and because PVY pressure is very high in North Carolina, glandular trichomes from another diploid species, Solanum berthaultii, were introduced as a defense against aphids, the PVY vector. Two types of glandular trichomes, A and B, were transferred. Preliminary results show that genetic diversity and broad-sense heritability are adequate to transfer these traits; however, non-additive gene action was indicated in narrow-sense heritability estimates. Spearman's coefficients of rank correlation showed a low level of association between A and B trichomes; density of both types is postulated to be under the control of a Small number of genes.

Free access

David R. Duncan, David Hammond, Jim Zalewski, John Cudnohufsky, Wojciech Kaniewski, Mike Thornton, Jeffrey T. Bookout, Paul Lavrik, Glennon J. Rogan, and Jennifer Feldman-Riebe

After more than 10 years of research, Monsanto scientists have developed improved seed potatoes that are protected from serious pests, including insects and disease. The first commercial products resulting from this effort were NewLeaf ® potatoes derived from `Russet Burbank' and `Atlantic' parents. The NewLeaf® product was commercialized in 1995 and contains a gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (variety tenebrionis) (B.t.t.). for the production of the Cry3A protein. Potatoes expressing this gene are completely protected from the Colorado potato beetle (CPB) and need no additional chemical protection for this insect pest. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have all determined that these potatoes are the same in safety and nutritional composition as any other `Russet Burbank' and `Atlantic' potatoes. These potatoes have also been approved by Health Canada, Agri-Food Canada and Agriculture Canada and by Japan and Mexico for food use. Commercial growers across North America have experienced outstanding performance while growing NewLeaf® potatoes 3 years in a row. This level of performance is the result of stable, nonsignificant differences in expression of the Cry3A gene. The stable performance, also, is a result of an effective insect resistance management program based on maintaining CPB refuges near NewLeaf ® fields, reducing CPB populations, and monitoring for CPB surviving exposure to NewLeaf® potatoes. In 1998 NewLeaf Y®), conferring resistance to both CPB and potato virus Y, and NewLeaf Plus®, conferring resistance to CPB and potato leafroll virus will be commercially released.

Free access

Roger L. Vallejo, Wanda W. Collins, and Robert H. Moll

Glandular trichomes from some Solanum species have suppressed infestation by insects including green peach aphid, which is a main vector of potato virus Y (PVY) and potato leaf roll virus (PLRV), both of which contribute to a serious loss in potato production. Eight Solanum phureja Juz. et Buk.-S. stenotomum Juz. (Phu-Stn), three S. berthaultii Hawkes (Ber), nine F1 [(Phu-Stn) × Ber], fifteen backcross (BC) [(Phu-Stn) × F1], and seventeen reciprocal BC (BCR) [F1 × (Phu-Stn)] families were evaluated to determine the genetic variability and heritability of A and B glandular trichome density and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity. Experiments were carried out in completely randomized and randomized complete-block designs in the greenhouse. Genetic analysis was done using half-sib family and parent-offspring regression analysis. Phu-Stn showed a higher density of A trichomes than Ber and F1, while the BC and BCR had densities of A trichomes similar to Phu-Stn. B trichomes were not observed in Phu-Stn. Ber showed a high B trichome density, which was transmitted to the F1. In the BC, B trichomes were almost absent, but, in the BCR, the density of B trichomes was higher than that of BC. Ber and F1 had similar or higher PPO activity than Phu-Stn. PPO activity decreased in the BC, but, in the BCR, it was high and similar to Ber and F1. Broad-sense heritability estimates for A and B trichome density and PPO activity were from medium to high (0.48 to 0.77) in Phu-Stn, Ber, and F1. Narrow-sense heritability estimates for A and B trichome density and PPO activity were very low (0.04 to 0.24) in BC and BCR. In the BC families, additive genetic variance was very low for A and B trichome density and PPO activity. Half-sib family selection based on progeny testing and combined with BCs to Phu-Stn in subsequent generations would be a suggested breeding procedure to improve these traits. Phenotypic correlations between A and B trichome densities were 0.26 (F1) and 0.44 (BCR), between A trichome density and PPO activity 0.20 (F1) and 0.31 (BCR), and between B trichome density and PPO activity 0.04 (F1) and 0.27(BCR. Positive associations found between traits might facilitate simultaneous improvement for high levels of A and B trichome density and PPO activity.

Open access

Christian T. Christensen, Lincoln Zotarelli, Kathleen G. Haynes, and Charles Ethan Kelly

., 2014 )], resistance to potato virus Y (PVY) [ Potyvirus ( Sato et al., 2006 )], and potato leafroll virus (PLRV) [ Polerovirus ( Brown and Thomas, 1993 )]. This species also accumulates a number of glycoalkaloid compounds that work as natural

Full access

Jesús Enrique Retes-Manjarrez, Sergio Hernández-Verdugo, Carlos Alfonso López-Orona, Raymundo Medina-López, José Antonio Garzón-Tiznado, and Jesús Enrique Retes-Cázarez

al., 2009 ). Resistant commercial cultivars are available in these markets for the most common Potyviruses [ Potato virus Y (PVY), TEV, and PepMoV] and Bromoviruses [ Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)]; however, no commercial pepper cultivars are

Free access

Kevin M. Crosby, Justin Butcher, Kil Sun Yoo, and Daniel I. Leskovar

resistance were inoculated with south Texas isolates of TEV, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and Potato virus Y (PVY). ‘Avelar’ and ‘Agronomico 8’ both demonstrated resistance to these three viruses, and ‘Avelar’ demonstrated resistance to PepMoV ( Cook, 1960

Free access

Kevin M. Crosby, John L. Jifon, Benigno Villalon, and Daniel I. Leskovar

an F 15 selection out of the sweet jalapeño line 79053, an F 2 line with resistance to Texas isolates of TEV, Potato Virus Y (PVY), and PepMoV ( Fig. 1 ). The pedigree includes three sources of potyvirus resistance: ‘Avelar’, PI 264281, and AC