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Pascal Braekman, Dieter Foqué, Marie-Christine Van Labeke, Jan G. Pieters, and David Nuyttens

effect of spray application technique on the spray deposition in ivy pot plants grown on hanging shelves in greenhouses. In particular, the effect of application rate, nozzle type, size and spray pressure, and the difference between the traditional spray

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Masahiko Fumuro

limited soil capacity, which prolonged the life span of the pot-planted trees. Although the weight of the thick root in the own-rooted trees was lower than that of the grafted trees ( Table 2 ), Oya et al. (2015) reported that the dry weight of the

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D.G. Ranamukhaarachchi, R.J. Henny, C.L. Guy, and Q.B. Li

Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were utilized to determine the genetic relationships of nine morphologically similar pot plant cultivars of Anthurium sp. by developing DNA fingerprints (DFP). Of 25 arbitrary primers screened, nine generated DFPs that were used in computing the genetic distance (d) and similarity coefficient (C) values. All cultivars tested exhibited a high degree of genetic similarity. `Lady Ann' and `Lady Beth' possessed the closest relationship with d and C values of 0.06 and 0.98, respectively. The next closest genetic relationship was between `Red Hot' and `Southern Blush' (d = 0.33, C = 0.89). These two cultivars exhibited a more distant relationship to the other seven cultivars as indicated by higher `d' values. However, this study showed that the nine Anthurium cultivars examined were genetically closely related. These cultivars share specific DNA bands with three possible parental species (A. andraeanum Linden ex Andre, A. antioquens L., and A. amnicola Dressler) included in this study, which may indicate similarities in their pedigree. This study shows that RAPDs can be a useful tool to distinguish Anthurium pot plant cultivars as well as identify their genetic relationships.

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Zhanao Deng, Brent K. Harbaugh, and Natalia A. Peres

pot-plant producers, homeowners, and landscapers ( Evans et al., 1992 ; Harbaugh and Tjia, 1985 ). The majority of caladiums commercially produced in the world belong to the fancy leaf type, and the most popular color has been white (white center with

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Zhanao Deng and Natalia A. Peres

Foam Pink’ can produce quality pot plants with or without de-eyeing. Grown side by side, container plants of ‘Sea Foam Pink’ are taller and wider than those of ‘Miss Muffet’; leaves of ‘Sea Foam Pink’ are longer and wider than ‘Miss Muffet’ leaves. For

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Julián Miralles-Crespo, María J. Sánchez-Blanco, Alejandra Navarro G., Juan J. Martínez-Sánchez, Jose A. Franco L., and Sebastián Bañón A.

important indicators such as ET have been less studied because of the difficulty involved in its precise determination in soil-cultivated trees ( Sivyer et al., 1997 ). When a plant is cultivated in a pot, plant ET can be measured with accuracy ( Argo and

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Allan M. Armitage and Paul Thomas

The influence of cooling, photoperiod and chemical branching on early spring flowering of perennial species was studied. Cooling was provided while plants were in plugs (128 plugs per tray) and dikegulac-sodium, a compound found to induce breaks in other species, was applied prior to, during and after cooling. Plants were cooled in insulated lighted coolers for 4, 8 or 12 weeks at 4C, and brought to a greenhouse with night temperatures between 8-12C. Long and short days were provided in the greenhouse after plants came out of the coolers. Little response to dikegulac occurred, however, Campanula, Sedum, Leontopodium, Catananche, Aubrietia, Arabis, Gypsophila, Anchusa and Aquilegia responded to cooling and photoperiodic treatment. Flowering and vegetative characteristics such as internode elongation and plant height responded to photoperiod and cooling but not all genera responded similarly. Anchusa, Campanula, Aquilegia and Gypsophila flowered significantly earlier under LD compared to SD. Twelve weeks of cooling resulted in flowering of all genera, however, some genera were equally responsive to shorter cooling times.

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Fabienne Gauthier, Blanche Dansereau, and Serge Gagnon

During Spring–Summer 1994, seedlings of Impatiens walleranc `Accent Coral' and Pelargonium × hortorum `Orbit Hot Pink' were grown in a commercial substrate (PRO-MIX BX) or in one of two substrates composed of six organic residues (composted water treated sludge, forestry compost, fresh or composted used peat extracted from a biofilter during treatment of municipal water, and fresh or composted paper sludge). These residues were incorporated with peatmoss and perlite at 5%, 10%, 25%, and 40% by volume to obtain the 24 substrate combinations. Plants were watered and fertilized by flooding ebb-and-flow benches. Growth measurements (growth index, top and root dry weight, number of flowers and buds, visual quality) varied considerably depending or the percentage of residue incorporated into the substrates. Moreover, substrates containing 40% of organic residues are not recommended for the production of impatiens and geraniums.

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Shannon E. Beach*, Terri W. Starman, and H. Brent Pemberton

Bracteantha bracteata (Vent.) Anderb. & Haegi (bracteantha) is a vegetative annual produced as a 12.7-cm potted plant in 6 weeks of greenhouse production. A dense leaf canopy produced with a conventional constant-feed fertilization regime (300 mg·L-1 20N-4.4P-16.6K) caused increased disease pressure and lower leaf chlorosis during greenhouse production. During shelf life, lower leaves of plants con-tinued to become chlorotic. The objective was to decrease leaf area and prevent lower leaf chlorosis without affecting harvest time, plant quality or shelf life of two cultivars of three series of bracteantha. The first experiment was to reduce the rate of fertilizer two weeks prior to harvest. Treatments were no fertility reduction (300 mg/liter), 50% reduction (150 mg/liter), and 100% reduction (0 mg·L-1). At harvest, plants were evaluated for shelf life in a growth room at 21.1 ± 1.3 °C and 6 μmol·m-2·s-1 PPF. Five cultivars in the 100% fertility reduction treatment had decreased height and/or width index at harvest and three cultivars maintained higher postharvest quality ratings compared to the other treatments. Separately, the effect of the duration of fertilization was evaluated by terminating fertilization at weekly intervals (0-6 weeks) throughout production. Ceasing fertilization two to three weeks prior to harvest produced plants with lower leaf area without affecting flower number. In another experiment, thidiazuron (TDZ) as a foliar spray at 0, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg·L-1 was applied to decrease lower leaf yellowing. SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter readings of lower leaves were increased with 0.1 mg·L-1 TDZ treatment compared to the control. Phytotoxic symptoms occurred on plants receiving higher TDZ rates.

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Fabienne Gauthier, Blanche Dansereau, and Serge Gagnon

During Winter 1994, seedlings of Impatiens wallerana `Accent Coral' and Pelargonium ×hortorum `Orbit Hot Pink' were grown in commercial substrate (Pro-Mix BX) or in one of the 24 substrates composed of six organic residues (composted water-treated sludge, forestry compost, fresh or composted used peat extracted by a biofilter during treatment of municipal water, and fresh or composted paper sludge). These residues were incorporated with peatmoss and perlite at 5%, 10%, 25%, and 40% per volume to obtain the 24 substrate combinations. Plants were watered and fertilized by flooding of ebb-and-flow benches. Growth measurements (growth index, top and root dry weight, number of flowers and buds, visual quality) varied considerably depending on the percentage of residue incorporated into the substrates. Moreover, substrates containing 40% of organic residues are not recommended for production of impatiens or geraniums.