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Reza Saeedi, Nematollah Etemadi, Ali Nikbakht, Amir H. Khoshgoftarmanesh, and Mohammad R. Sabzalian

diameter, flower number, vase life, and percentage reduction in fresh weight of the harvested cut flowers. Calcium amino acid chelates (particularly calcium lysine chelate) were the most effective on qualitative features, especially postharvest life of the

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Jingwei Dai and Robert E. Paull

The postharvest life of Dendrobium spp. flower sprays was limited by wilting and shedding of individual “flowers. Late-summer-harvested sprays had a reduced postharvest life compared to winter-harvested sprays. Cultivars differed in postharvest life in response to packing and storing for 2 days at 22C. Water 10ss rates of `Princess' sprays continuously held in deionized water declined from ≈ 1.25 g/day per spray 4 days after harvest to 0.35 g/day per spray 20 days later. Flower shedding occurred when the rate of water loss fell below ≈1.0 g/day per spray. Addition of a floral preservative to the vase water slowed the decline in water loss and increased postharvest life. Sprays packed and stored for 6 days at 22C had half the postharvest life of nonpacked controls held in deionized water or of sprays packed for 2 or 4 days at 22C. Submerging sprays in water immediately after harvest did not significantly increase postharvest life; submerging the sprays after harvest, before packing, and again after unpacking reduced postharvest life. Sprays could not be held for more than 4 days at 10C without suffering chilling injury. Silver thiosulphate (2 mm) and other silver preparations had no effect on postharvest life, although silver ions did reach the top flowers of the spray; thus, ethylene may play only a minor role in spray postharvest life. The postharvest life of sprays was increased by using boiled deionized water in vase solutions and by the continuous presence of chloramphenicol. Other antimicrobial agents, such as Physan, sodium hypochlorite, and sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione dihydrate were without effect. Microbial growth in the vase solution and at the cut stem end mav have reduced water transport and induced subsequent flower wilting and shedding.

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Farzad Nazari and Mahmoud Koushesh Saba

is crucial to persuade the consumer to repurchase them ( Reid and Jiang, 2012 ). Therefore, one of the main problems in gerbera export and marketing is postharvest losses, and short postharvest life attribute to the water relation disruptions

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John M. Dole, Paul Fisher, and Geoffrey Njue

Several treatments were investigated for increasing vase life of cut `Renaissance Red' poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch.) stems. A vase life of at least 20.6 days resulted when harvested stems were placed directly into vases with 22 °C deionized water plus 200 mg·L-1 8-HQS (the standard floral solution used) and 0% to 1% sucrose without floral foam. Maturity of stems at harvest, ranging from 0 to 4 weeks after anthesis, had no effect on vase life or days to first abscised leaf. Pretreatments immediately after harvest using floral solution heated to 38 or 100 °C, or 1 or 10-min dips in isopropyl alcohol, had no effect, whereas 24 hours in 10% sucrose shortened vase life by 6.4 days and time to first abscised cyathium by 4.5 days. Stem storage at 10 °C decreased vase life, particularly when stems were stored dry (with only 0.8 days vase life after 3 weeks dry storage). Increasing duration of wet storage in floral solution from 0 to 3 weeks decreased vase life from 21.5 to 14.6 days. Placing cut stems in a vase containing floral foam decreased time to first abscised leaf by 3.7 to 11.6 days compared with no foam. A 1% to 2% sucrose concentration in the vase solution produced the longest postharvest life for stems placed in foam but had little effect on stems not placed in foam. A 4% sucrose concentration decreased vase life compared with lower sucrose concentrations regardless of the presence of foam. Holding stems in the standard floral solution increased vase life and delayed leaf abscission compared with deionized or tap water only, with further improvement when stem bases were recut every three days. Commercial floral pretreatments and holding solutions had no effect on vase life and days to first abscised cyathium but delayed leaf abscission.

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V.V.V. Ku, R.B.H. Wills, and S. Ben-Yehoshua

Strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) fruit were fumigated for 2 hours at 20 °C with 1-mcp at concentrations from 5 to 500 nL·L-1, then held at 20 and 5 °C in air containing 0.1 μL·L-1 ethylene. Fumigation with 1-mcp at 5 to 15 nL·L-1 extended the postharvest life by ≈35% at 20 °C and 150% at 5 °C, but at higher 1-mcp concentrations there was an accelerated loss of quality with a 30% to 60% decrease in postharvest life at 500 nL·L-1 at both 20 and 5 °C. Chemical name used: 1-methylcyclopropene (1-mcp).

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Kenneth R. Schroeder and Dennis P. Stimart

Flowering stems from three commercial inbreds and their F1 hybrids of Antirrhinum majus L. were cut when the first eight basal florets opened. Tops of the stems were removed above the eighth floret and florets were removed leaving two, four, six, or eight open florets on a stem. A completely random design with 10 replications was used. Flowering stems were placed in plastic storage containers 35 × 23 × 14 cm (L × W × H) with 2.5 L deionized water for postharvest evaluation. Evaluation took place under continuous cool-white fluorescent light (9 μmol·m–2·s–1) at 24°C Postharvest life was determined as the number of days from cutting to discard when 50% of the open florets on a flowering stem wilted, turned brown, or dried. Results showed postharvest life increased as the number of open florets on a stem decreased. Mean postharvest life increased as much as 4.7 days when only two florets remained on a stem. These results indicate a direct relationship between number of florets on a cut flower stem and postharvest life.

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Giancarlo Colelli, F. Gordon Mitchell, and Adel A. Kader

Good quality of fresh `Mission' figs (Ficus carica L.) was maintained for up to 4 weeks when kept at 0, 2.2, or 5C in atmospheres enriched with 15% or 20% CO2. The visible benefits of exposure to high CO2 levels were reduction of decay incidence and maintenance of bright external appearance. Ethylene production was lower, and fruit softening (as measured with a deformation tester) was slower in the high-CO2-stored figs than in those kept in air. Ethanol content of the CO2-treated fruit increased slightly during the first 3 weeks and moderately during the 4th week, while acetaldehyde concentration increased during the first week, then decreased. The results may be applicable to the transport and storage of fresh `Mission' figs, as high CO2 extended their postharvest life, especially near 0C.

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Emilie Proulx, Yavuz Yagiz, M. Cecilia, N. Nunes, and Jean-Pierre Emond

5 °C, because after transfer to 15 °C, their postharvest life was reduced by only 3%, whereas postharvest life of ‘Top Crop’ and ‘Tendergreen’ snap beans was reduced by 40% resulting from CI. Yet, the snap bean cultivars most affected by CI with a 60

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Clara Pelayo, Betty Hess-Pierce, Susan E. Ebeler, and Adel A. Kader

Elevated CO2 atmospheres reduce decay and extend postharvest life based on appearance of strawberries but flavor quality may be lost faster than appearance quality. California-grown `Aromas', `Diamante,' and `Selva' strawberries were stored at 5 °C in air or 20 kPa CO2 + air for 15 days and evaluated for quality attributes, chemical changes, and flavor. In a “Preference Test”, `Selva” and `Diamante' were more preferred than `Aromas'. This may be related to their higher titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), the concentration of total aroma compounds, a different methyl/ethyl esters ratio, and the presence of C6 aldehydes. The postharvest life in air was 7, 9, and 9 days for `Aromas', `Diamante' and `Selva', respectively and these periods were extended by 30%, 20%, and 45% in the CO2-enriched atmosphere. There were no significant differences in TA or TSS between fruits kept in air or in air + CO2 and panelists could not detect differences in sourness and sweetness after 9 days of storage. In contrast, there was a trend for CO2-stored fruits of the three cultivars to be categorized as more aromatic, and for `Aromas' and `Selva' fruits to be described as more “strawberry like” in flavor compared to the corresponding air-stored fruits. The total aroma concentration decreased to a lesser extent in `Aromas' and `Selva' strawberries kept in air + CO2 than in those stored in air. The CO2-enriched atmosphere stimulated fermentative metabolism only in `Aromas' and `Selva'; the higher concentration of ethanol in these two cultivars favored the synthesis of ethyl esters. The total content of aroma compounds and the methyl/ethyl esters ratio may be two of the multiple factors determining the overall fruit flavor.

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Kenneth R. Schroeder and Dennis P. Stimart

Leaf impressions were made from two short-lived (4 and 5 d) inbreds, a long-lived (11 d) inbred, and their hybrids (8 and 9 d) of Antirrhinum majus L. using Super Glue and glass microscope slides. Leaves were taken from mid stem, pressed on glass slides (under side down), spread with a small amount of Super Glue, set for 3 to 4 s. Then, the leaf was peeled off leaving a permanent impression in the glue. Slides were placed under a microscope equipped with a video imaging system and computer images were taken to facilitate counting of stomatal complexes. Number of stomata ranged from 10,400 to 21,300 per cm2 of leaf. A LI-COR LI-3100 area meter (LI-COR, Inc. Lincoln, Neb.) was used to measure total leaf area of 40-cm cut flower stems of each accession. Stomata per flowering stem ranged from 1,074,000 to 2,282,000, with the long-lived inbred having the fewest stomata, the hybrids intermediate with 11% to 21% more, and the short-lived inbreds having 40% to 113% more stomata per stem. It appears long postharvest life of A. majus is associated with flowering stems with fewer stomata per cut stem.