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Gaetano Distefano, Giuseppina Las Casas, Stefano La Malfa, Alessandra Gentile, Eugenio Tribulato, and Maria Herrero

between the cultivars. In citrus, although no proper genetic studies have been done, the control of incompatibility is thought to be gametophytic; that is, based on the behaviors of the pollen tubes, because the incompatibility reaction occurs after

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Khalil R. Jahed and Peter M. Hirst

) followed by an adhesion of pollen grains to the papilla cells of the stigmatic surface ( Dresselhaus and Franklin-Tong, 2013 ; Selinski and Scheibe, 2014 ). The deposited pollen hydrates and germinates and then pollen tubes penetrate the stigma and grow

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Chao Gao, Deyi Yuan, Ya Yang, Bifang Wang, Dongming Liu, and Feng Zou

The compatible fertilization of angiosperms is initiated through the hydration of the pollen at the stigma and the germination of the pollen tube. After entering the interpapillar cell space, the tube grows in the stylar canal or transmitting tissue

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Candace N. DeLong, Keith S. Yoder, Leon Combs, Richard E. Veilleux, and Gregory M. Peck

Apple pollination occurs when pollen is transferred, often by an insect vector, from the anthers of one blossom to the stigma of another. After pollen grains are deposited, they are rehydrated by stigmatic secretions, and pollen tube growth begins

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Yiran Li, Asuka Uchida, Akiha Abe, Akihiro Yamamoto, Tomonari Hirano, and Hisato Kunitake

-RNase models, S -allele are genes closely linked to the recognition of self-fertilization and the degradation of RNA in self-fertilized pollen tubes. Goldraij et al. (2006) proposed the compartmentalization model, which suggests that not only S-RNase but

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Keith Yoder, Rongcai Yuan, Leon Combs, Ross Byers, Jim McFerson, and Tory Schmidt

and fertilization through damaging the anthers, stigma, and style of flowers or inhibiting pollen tube growth in the style of flowers and are applied when some, but not all, flowers are fertilized ( Fallahi and Willemsen, 2002 ; Greene, 2002

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Thomas M. Kon, James R. Schupp, Keith S. Yoder, Leon D. Combs, and Melanie A. Schupp

blossoms. Common timings include 20%, 60%, 80%, 100%, or all full bloom, and single or multiple applications can be applied. Inconsistent blossom-thinning responses may be attributed to application timing because pollen tubes can reach the base of the style

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Thomas M. Kon, Melanie A. Schupp, Hans E. Winzeler, and James R. Schupp

strategy, the effects of TS temperature and treatment duration on pollen tube growth in vivo and visible spur leaf injury were evaluated. Materials and Methods Trials were conducted in 2014 and 2015 at the Pennsylvania State University’s Fruit Research and

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Thomas M. Kon, Melanie A. Schupp, Hans E. Winzeler, and James R. Schupp

interaction of the intensity, duration, and rate of temperature change ( Wahid et al., 2007 ). As demonstrated with an ornamental lily, pollen tube growth in vivo was temporarily arrested with 10-s exposure to 45 °C ( Pierson et al., 1993 ). Unlike leaves and

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Nachida Ben-Njima

Group-author : R. Socias i Company

Pollen tube growth was studied in 10 almond [Prunus amygdalus Batsch, syn. P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] selections of the Zaragoza breeding program, whose main objective is the development of self-compatible cultivars. Self-compatibility was evident in eight of the selections, as indicated by the fact that pollen tube growth was similar following self- and cross-pollination. In the other two selections, pollen tube growth differed following self- and cross-pollination, one showing self-incompatibility and the other an irregular progression of crossed pollen tubes. The importance of the style in sustaining pollen tube growth was evident, and pollen tube growth was influenced by style type.