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Erfan K. Vafaie, H. Brent Pemberton, Mengmeng Gu, David Kerns, Micky D. Eubanks, and Kevin M. Heinz

example, management of whiteflies (Aleyrodidae) on poinsettia ( Euphorbia pulcherrima ) historically has relied on regular applications of insecticides ( Palumbo et al., 2001 ; Sharaf, 1986 ; Stevens et al., 2000 ), with some growers applying

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Bridget K. Behe, Paul B. Redman, and John M. Dole

Mathematical Science, Auburn University, for her statistical assistance, and the Central Ohio Flower Growers Association for providing all of the poinsettias in the display.

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Yusef S. Siraj Ali, Harry K. Tayama, Thomas L. Prince, and Stephen A. Carver

Paul Ecke Poinsettias, Encinitas, Calif., for donation of poinsettia seeds and cuttings. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked

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Brian E. Whipker and P. Allen Hammer

Paper no. 13707 of the Agricultural Experiment Station of Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, Ind. Thanks to the Fred C. Gloeckner Foundation for want support and the Paul Ecke Poinsettia Ranch for supplying the plant material. The cost of

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Jeff S. Kuehny and Margaret J. McMahon

This decision case concerns production and marketing problems that many ornamental growers incur. At the retail level, popular ornamental crops are often used as loss leaders to draw the public into stores to make other purchases. As a result, retail buyers are concerned not with quality but with price and volume. To meet the needs of price-conscious buyers, growers may attempt to reduce their production costs by reducing the level of production inputs, with some sacrifice in product quality. The owners of Two Sisters Greenhouses must decide whether they are going to produce lower-quality plants, change marketing strategies, or grow alternative crops to retain their current profit margins. This case study was intended for use in greenhouse management, nursery management, and floriculture courses where students assume the role of a decisionmaker in poinsettia production and marketing.

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J. Lorene Embry and Eugene A. Nothnagel

thank the Paul Ecke Poinsettia Ranch for providing rooted poinsettia cuttings, David Hartley for advice on poinsettia production and for reviewing the manuscript, Ursula Schuch for reviewing the manuscript, Van Stout for designing and constructing the

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Dinum Perera and Brian W. Trader

Milky sap (latex) secreted at the cut surfaces is a common feature of the family Euphorbiaceae; the genus Euphorbia consists of close to 2000 species ( Ecke et al., 2004 ). Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch, poinsettia, belongs to

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Yusef S. Siraj-Ali, Harry K. Tayama, Thomas L. Prince, and Stephen A. Carver

support provided in part by state and federal funds appropriated to the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State Univ., Columbus. From the PhD dissertation of Yusef S. Siraj-Ali. We acknowledge the support of Paul Ecke Poinsettias

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Brian E. Whipker and P. Allen Hammer

1 Current address: Dept. of Horticulture, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011. Purdue Univ. Agricultural Experiment Station journal paper no. 15328. Thanks to the Paul Ecke Poinsettia Ranch, Encinitas, Calif., for supplying the plant material and the

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Douglas A. Bailey and William B. Miller

1 Current address: Dept. of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State Univ., Box 7609, Raleigh, NC 27695-7609. 2 Current address: Dept. of Horticulture, Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC 29634. Appreciation is extended to Paul Ecke Poinsettias