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Andrea Swanberg and Wenhao Dai

, explant, dark treatment, and antibiotics that influence plant regeneration ability of periwinkle. Such data are essential for the successful development of an efficient plant regeneration system for Agrobacterium -mediated transformation in this species

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Akira Sugiura, Yoshiko Matsuda-Habu, Mei Gao, Tomoya Esumi, and Ryutaro Tao

; Tao and Sugiura, 1992b ; Yokoyama and Takeuchi, 1976 ). Shoot tip culture of current-year shoots is possible ( Sugiura et al., 1986 ) as is plant regeneration from calli and cell cultures derived from dormant buds ( Tao et al., 1988 ; Tao and Sugiura

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Li Xu, Suzhen Huang, Yulin Han, and Haiyan Yuan

). Somatic embryogenesis is the fastest system of plant regeneration and generally considered to be prerequisite for genetic transformation ( Jeknic et al., 1999 ; Karami et al., 2006 ). Therefore, several protocols for iris regeneration via somatic

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Lunique Estime, Marie O'Shea, Michael Borst, Jennifer Gerrity, and Shih-Long Liao

Typha latifolia L. (broadleaf cattail) callus was initiated from leaf sections, as well as from pistillate and staminate spikes. Two basal media in combination with three growth regulator regimes were tested for their capacity to induce callus from the explants. Pistillate spikes maintained in the dark on B5 medium supplemented with 5 mg·L-1 dicamba and 1 mg·L-1 BA produced the fastest growing cell line compared to other explants and media combinations. A growth curve in suspension culture was generated for this cell line on B5 medium. The mass of the callus increased by 150% by the end of the growth curve. Upon transfer of the callus to MS medium without growth regulators but with 3% sucrose and 3% phytagel, plants could be regenerated from 22% of the cultures. Chemical names used: 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (dicamba); N 6-benzyladenine (BA).

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Ilse-Yazmín Arciniega-Carreón, Carmen Oliver-Salvador, María-Guadalupe Ramírez-Sotelo, and Carlos Edmundo Salas

. Ashwath, N. 2002 Ex vitro rooting of micropropagated shoots of Stackhousia tryonii Biol. Plant. 45 441 444 Compton, M.E. Gray, D.J. 1993 Shoot organogenesis and plant regeneration from cotyledons of diploid, triploid and tetraploid watermelon J. Amer. Soc

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María Victoria González, Manuel Rey, and Roberto Rodríguez

A simple and reliable protocol for plant regeneration from petioles of micropropagated plants of kiwifruit [Actinidia deliciosa (A. Chev) Liang and Ferguson, var. deliciosa `Hayward'] is described. Morphogenic callus was initiated by culturing petioles taken from in vitro-propagated plants. From the media tested, Cheng's K(h) medium plus 0.1 μm IAA, 4.5 μm zeatin, and 2% sucrose was the best for callus induction, maintenance, and shoot bud formation and development. Bases of developed shoots were immersed in 5 mm IBA for 15 seconds; subsequent culture in half-strength K(h) basal medium achieved 82% rooting. Regenerated plantlets were successfully transplanted to soil with 97% survival. Chemical names used: indole-3-acetic acid (IAA); indole-3-butyric acid (IBA); 2-methyl-4-(1H-purin-6-ylamino)-2-buten-1-ol (zeatin).

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Chiu-Yueh Hung and Jiahua Xie

objective of the current study was to establish a plant regeneration system for both the Se-hyperaccumulator A. racemosus and the nonaccumulator A. canadensis . To induce shoots, another more moderate auxin, a-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), was chosen to

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Yuyu Wang, Faju Chen, Yubing Wang, Xiaoling Li, and Hongwei Liang

the process of seed germination of Tapiscia sinensis ( Han, 2010 ; Zhou and Duan, 2008 ). However, no efficient in vitro plant regeneration system of T. sinensis has been reported. Hence, there is a demand for the development of a conservation

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V.M. Gingas

Partially expanded male catkins at the pre-pollen shedding stage of Quercus rubra L. and Quercus bicolor Willd. were cultured on MS medium supplemented with BA or 2,4D Explants on 2,4D produced a yellow embryogenic callus, seeming to originate from the pedicels. Subsequent transfers to BA and then, MS without growth regulators, resulted in callus proliferation. After ten weeks in culture, white embryoids developed from the callus of Q. bicolor. Separated and individually cultured embryoids underwent direct, repetitive embryogenesis. Upon transfer to ½-strength MS, embryoid germination and plant regeneration occurred, Callus of Q. rubra degenerated after five months in culture, failing to produce embryogenic structures.

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V.M. Gingas

Partially expanded male catkins of swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor Willd.) and red oak (Quercus rubra L.) were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with BA or 2,4-D. Explants on 2,4-D produced a yellow embryogenic callus originating from the junction of the pedicel and peduncle. Subsequent transfers to MS with BA and then MS without growth regulators resulted in callus proliferation. After 10 to 14 weeks in culture, white embryoids developed from the callus of Q. bicolor. Separated and individually cultured embryoids underwent direct, repetitive embryogenesis. Upon transfer to l/2-strength MS, embryoid germination and plant regeneration occurred. Callus of Q. rubra degenerated after 5 months in culture, failing to yield embryogenic structures. Chemical names used: dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); benzyladenine (BA).