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Ertan Yildirim, Huseyin Karlidag, Metin Turan, Atilla Dursun and Fahrettin Goktepe

decrease negative environmental impacts resulting from inefficient use of chemical fertilizers is inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). These bacteria exert beneficial effects on plant growth and development and therefore may be used

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Don Merhaut and Julie Newman

Four types of media [coir, 1 coir: 1 peat (by volume), peat, and sandy loam soil] were evaluated for their effects on plant growth and nitrate (NO 3) leaching in the production of oriental lilies (Lilium L.) `Starfighter' and `Casa Blanca'. Twenty-five bulbs were planted in perforated plastic crates and placed on the ground in temperature-controlled greenhouses. The potential for NO 3 leaching was determined by placing an ion-exchange resin (IER) bag under each crate at the beginning of the study. After plant harvest (14 to 16 weeks), resin bags were collected and analyzed for NO 3 content. Plant tissues were dried, ground, and analyzed for N content. Results indicated that the use of coir and peat did not significantly influence plant growth (shoot dry weight) relative to the use of sandy loam soil; however, substrate type influenced the amount of NO 3 leached through the media and N accumulation in the shoots for `Starfighter', but not `Casa Blanca'.

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Shi-Ying Wang

76 ORAL SESSION 13 (Abstr. 478-483) Floriculture: Postharvest Physiology/Plant Growth Regulators

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Helen E. Hammond, Richard K. Schoellhorn, Sandra B. Wilson and Jeffrey G. Norcini

cumbersome size for handling and shipping. Applications of plant growth regulators (PGRs) may help to extend the amount of time these plants can be held before distribution and sale, to improve visual quality, and to facilitate shipping. There are many PGRs

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Craig A. Campbell

142 WORKSHOP 19 (Abstr. 688-690) Opportunities and Challenges in the Development and Registration of Plant Growth Regulators Wednesday, 26 July, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon

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D.W. Williams and P.B. Burrus

1 Assistant Professor. 2 Research Specialist. We gratefully acknowledge partial funding of this project by the United States Golf Association and the Kentucky Turfgrass Council. Discussions of herbicides and plant growth regulators imply no

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Victoria M. Anderson, Douglas D. Archbold, Robert L. Geneve, Dewayne L. Ingram and Krista L. Jacobsen

; Gaskell and Smith, 2007 ; Hartz et al., 2010 ), leading to deficiencies that can reduce plant growth ( Chand et al., 2011 ; Nourimand et al., 2012 ; Siddiqui et al., 2011 ). Although N stress is generally detrimental to plant growth, the effects on

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Sarah A. White, Holly L. Scoggins, Richard P. Marini and Joyce G. Latimer

fulfillment of the requirements for the MS degree. The authors gratefully acknowledge the technical assistance of Velva Groover. Plant material generously provided by Yoder Green Leaf, Lancaster, Pa. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of plant growth

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Christopher J. Currey, Diane M. Camberato, Ariana P. Torres and Roberto G. Lopez

A common cultural practice in greenhouse production is to apply plant growth retardants (PGRs) to produce uniform, compact, and marketable plants. Plant growth retardants can be applied in several ways, including foliar sprays, substrate drenches

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Xueni Wang, R. Thomas Fernandez, Bert M. Cregg, Rafael Auras, Amy Fulcher, Diana R. Cochran, Genhua Niu, Youping Sun, Guihong Bi, Susmitha Nambuthiri and Robert L. Geneve

emerged as alternative options to plastic containers ( Hall et al., 2010 ; Nambuthiri et al., 2015a ). As plant growth is an important factor in growers’ consideration when choosing containers, experiments have been carried out to investigate the impact