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Bruce L. Dunn, Stephen Stanphill, and Carla Goad

included pinching (leaving seven nodes), no pinching, no pinching plus Atrimmec (PBI-Gordon Corporation, KS City, MO) with rates of 3.9, 7.8, 11.7, and 23.4 mL⋅L −1 using tap water, and pinching with similar rates and conditions mentioned. Chemical

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Songul Sever Mutlu and Ece Agan

branched. Therefore, a technique such as pinching, manual removal of shoot apices, to overcome apical dominance and encourage lateral branching is a commercial recommendation in ornamental plant production ( Meijon et al., 2009 ) including pepper ( Larson

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Hans C. Wien

In previous studies, pinching of nonbranching sunflower cultivars in the seedling stage led to a more than 3-fold increase in stem production ( Wien, 2016 ). Many sunflower cultivars developed for cut flower use produce more than one stem, and are

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Hans C. Wien

The practice of removing an herbaceous plant’s growing point (commonly termed pinching or topping) has been used for many centuries to affect growth, plant productivity, or shape ( Escher, 1996 ; Hunt, 1893 ). Most commonly, pinching is used to

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Amir Rezazadeh, Richard L. Harkess, and Guihong Bi

and well-shaped, symmetrical plants. To achieve better uniformity, growers often use cultural practices including hand pinching and PGRs to release apical dominance. This allows dormant, lateral buds to grow resulting in well-branched plants ( Grossman

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Ryan M. Warner

inhibited during the young plant stage. Promotion of axillary meristem release from apical dominance is often achieved through shoot decapitation, or “pinching” ( Larson, 1985 ), or by application of chemical growth regulators, including benzyladenine

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Amir Rezazadeh and Richard L. Harkess

is necessary to provide desirable marketable products. Numerous techniques have been used to control height and produce marketable plants. Pinching is the removal of the apical bud to overcome apical dominance and promote lateral branch development

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J. E. Barrett and A. A. De Hertogh

Abstract

Pinching of forced tuberous-rooted Dahlia ‘Park Princess’ and ‘Miramar’ was evaluated as a method for increasing flower production and plant quality. Pinched plants produced more flowers, flowered later, had smaller flowers, and were taller than unpinched controls. On an individual plant basis, pinching at node 4 generally gave the best results, while pinching at node 2 resulted in the greatest delay and fewest flowers. The more distal the pinch, the greater the number of laterals formed on both cultivars and the higher the percent of laterals flowering on ‘Park Princess’. On a population basis, pinching only those plants with a single strong shoot at node 3 or 4 resulted in the best compromise between increased flower production and the deleterious delayed flowering and increased plant height.

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Janet C. Cole, Robert O. Brown, and Mark E. Payton

uniconazole, or pinching reduces plant growth of oakleaf hydrangea. Materials and methods 2002 Greenhouse study. Uniform rooted cuttings, about 30 cm in height, of ‘Alice’ oakleaf hydrangea were planted in 1-gal containers on 26 Sept. in Stillwater, OK. The

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W. H. deSilva, P. F. Bocion, and H. R. Walther

Abstract

Foliar application of 0.4 to 0.6% of an aqueous solution of sodium 2,3:4,6-di-O-isopropylidene-2-keto-L-gulonate) (dikegulac, Atrinal) was effective as a pinching agent under commercial growing conditions on all azalea (Rhododenron simsii Planch.) cultivars tested. One to 2 weeks after application the upper leaves turned yellow. Within 4 weeks after treatment the axillary shoots began to elongate and 4-8 weeks later the foliage regained a dark green color. Reproductive shoots treated with dikegulac produced new axillary shoots, but treatment should precede flower initiation for optimal results. At all dosage rates a better pinching effect was obtained with higher spray volumes. A spray volume of 200-300 ml/m2 (2-3 qts/100 ft2), depending on growth stage, is suggested. Dikegulac is a very promising chemical pinching agent for greenhouse azaleas.