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Paisan Loaharanu and Guy J. Hallman

Irradiation for Quality Improvement, Microbial Safety and Phytosanitation of Fresh Produce. Rivka Barkai-Golan and Peter A. Follett. 2017. Academic Press, London, UK. 286 pages, with illustrations. $127.50, eBook ISBN: 9780128110263, paperback ISBN

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James D. Hansen

Durations of ultrasound treatments were evaluated for efficacy in removing or destroying external pests of apples (Malus sylvestris var domestica). Egg hatch of codling moth (Cydia pomonella; Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), was inversely related to time of ultrasound exposure, although egg mortality was less than 60% after 45 min of treatment. Mortality of twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae; Acari: Tetranychidae), and western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis; Thysanoptera: Thripidae), was directly related to ultrasound durations; adding detergent to the ultrasound bath increased treatment efficacy. Ultrasound did not remove san jose scale (Quadraspidiotus perniciosus; Homoptera: Diaspididae), from the fruit surface. Ultrasound, which can be incorporated in the packing line, shows promise as a postharvest phytosanitation treatment against external pests.

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James D. Hansen

Two cold storage treatments were evaluated against eggs, early instars, and late instars of the oriental fruit moth [Cydia molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)] a quarantine pest for Mexico of stone and pome fruit from the United States. In the first, `Delicious' apples (Malus domestica) were infested with these life stages and treated for 13 weeks in cold storage at 38 °F (3.3 °C) in replicated studies. In the second, the same life stages infesting `Delicious' apples were exposed to air temperatures slightly above freezing, 33.3 ± 0.7 °F (0.7 ± 0.4 °C), up to 7 weeks to simulate near commercial storage conditions. Weekly subsamples of the life stages were examined for survival. At 38 °F, complete mortality was obtained for eggs and early instars by the eighth week, and for late instars by the tenth week. At near freezing temperatures, eggs and early instars died by the fourth week, and late instars eliminated by the sixth week. This study demonstrated that the treatments were effective against the infesting life stages.

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Krista C. Shellie and Robert L. Mangan

`Valencia' oranges [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] were exposed to moist, forced air (MFA) at 46, 47, or 50C for 1, 2, 3, or 4 hours to identify the maximum temperature and duration of exposure for which there was no detectable reduction in fruit quality. The flavor of oranges exposed to MFA at 47 or 50C was rated significantly inferior to that of oranges exposed to 46C. The degree minutes that accumulated in the center of the fruit between 2 and 4 hours and the maximum fruit center temperature during the heat treatment were associated with inferior fruit flavor. Oranges exposed to MFA at 46C for up to 4 hours could not be distinguished from the nonheated fruit. MFA at 46C is a promising quarantine treatment for `Valencia' oranges.

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Krista C. Shellie and Robert L. Mangan

`Dancy' tangerines (Citrus reticulata Blanco) were harvested after color break and exposed to high-temperature forced air (HTFA) at 45C for 3.5 or 4 h to kill Mexican fruit fly [Anastrepha ludens (Loew)] larvae. Heat-treated and control fruit were stored subsequently for 2 weeks at 4C. Tangerines harvested after color break (naturally degreened) tolerated exposure to HTFA in a similar fashion as tangerines harvested before color break and degreened by postharvest exposure to ethylene. Titratable acidity (TA) was significantly lower after heat treatments. Flavor, soluble solids concentration, external appearance, incidence of decay, percent juice yield, percent weight change, and flavedo color of heat-treated fruit were not different from nonheat-treated, control fruit. Exposure to HTFA is a viable alternative to methyl bromide for disinfestation of `Dancy' tangerine.

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Jules Janick, James E. Simon, Anna Whipkey and Ben Alkire

NewCROP (New Crops Resource On-line Program) is an Internet resource (http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop) developed by the Indiana Center for New Crops and Plant Products to deliver instant topical information on the subject of fiber, energy, and specialty crops. NewCROP includes CropSEARCH (an index to food and feed crops of the world, including taxonomic information, uses, and economic importance), FactSHEETS (in-depth articles on selected crops), NewCROP Import–Export (importation permits, phytosanitation certificates, quarantine and inspection information), Organizations (listings of crop organizations, societies, and interest groups), FamineFOODS (includes about 1250 species that are consumed in times of food scarcity), and FarmMARKET (listing locations of United States farmers' markets). The web site also includes new crop bibliographies, directories of new crop researchers, announcements of pertinent up-coming symposia and crop conventions, the New Crop Center newsletters, and activities of the Indiana Center for New Crops. A search engine is provided for quick information retrieval from the system. An electronic bulletin board, NewCROP LISTSERV is maintained for posting queries and messages to subscribers. We are planning to incorporate material from three books (>1930 pages and 6000 index entries) derived from New Crops symposia and published as Advances in New Crops (1990), New Crops (1993), and Progress in New Crops (1996). The NewCROP digital information program is interlinked with FAO's EcoCROP system and the Australian New Crops Programme, as part of a developing world-wide crop information network.

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Donald N. Maynard

aromatic plants, are unique. Dr. Nath states also that many plants are wild weeds in one part of the world but are edible and consumed in another part. The foreward notes also that a few underutilized plants are used for phytosanitation and phytoremediation

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Winston Elibox and Pathmanathan Umaharan

. The pH of the beds was maintained at 5.5 by regular liming (Limestone; TRINCARB, Port of Spain, Trinidad). Nematodes were controlled by application of Temik (Aldicarb, Shandong, China) every 6 months. Phytosanitation was performed once a week and the

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L.J. Grauke, Bruce W. Wood and Marvin K. Harris

, M.R. Florane, C. Graham, C.J. 2013 Temporal expression of pecan allergens during nut development J. Hort. Sci. Biotechnol. 88 2 173 178 Melanson, R.A. Sanderlin, R.S. 2015 Hot-water treatment of pecan scions as a means of phytosanitation to reduce

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Amy Fulcher, Anthony V. LeBude, James S. Owen Jr., Sarah A. White and Richard C. Beeson

as maximizing phytosanitation, rather than solely focusing on storage capacity. Capturing and reusing water must be part of future water management plans. Ground water withdrawal has significantly increased and is at unsustainable levels (i