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John E. Erwin, Royal D. Heins and Roar Moe

Fuchsia × hybrids `Dollar Princess' plants were grown under 35 day/night temperature (DT/NT) environments ranging from 10 to 30C over 2 years. Plants were grown under short days (SD) (9-hour 15-minute photoperiod) or long days (LD) (9-hour 15-minute photoperiod plus a 4-hour night interruption) within each environment. The influence of temperature on Fuchsia stem elongation and leaf expansion was best described by the relationship or difference (DIF) between DT and NT (DT - NT) rather than actual DT and NT between 10 and 25C. Both internode length and leaf area increased linearly as DIF increased from - 15 to + 15C with DT and NT between 10 and 25C. Internode length increased 0.129 and 0.071 cm/1C increase in DIF for LD- and SD-grown plants, respectively. Individual leaf area increased 0.52 and 0.40 cm2/1C increase in DIF for LD- and SD-grown plants, respectively. DT or NT above 24C reduced stem elongation and leaf expansion, regardless of DIF. The response of stem elongation and leaf expansion to DIF was greater on a percent basis when plants were grown under SD and LD, respectively. On an absolute basis, both internode length and leaf area were greater on LD-grown plants. Branching increased as average daily temperature decreased from 25 to 12C. Photoperiod did not affect branching.

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Mauricio J. Sarmiento and Jeff S. Kuehny

Rhizomes of Curcuma alismatifolia `Chiang Mai Pink' and tissue cultured plants of C. cordata, C. petiolata `Emperor', C. thorelii, Kaempferia sp. `Grande', Siphonichilus decora and S. kirkii were grown in a greenhouse under 8-, 12-, 16-, and 20-hour photoperiods. All plants grown under the 8-hour photoperiod became dormant over a 15 week time period. After 90 days, most ginger species grown under the 16- and 20-hour photoperiods were taller than those grown under 8 and 12 hours. A larger number of unfolded leaves was indicated for all ginger species grown under 16- and 20-hour photoperiods compared to those grown under 8- and 12-hour photoperiods except for C. thorelli. The percentage of unfolded leaves as determined by quartile indicated similar results. The number of underground rhizomes of C. alismatifolia, C. cordata, and C. petiolata increased when plants were grown at 16 and 20-hour photoperiods. The number of tuberous-roots (t-roots) increased as photoperiod decreased below 16 hours for C. alismatifolia, C. cordata, C. petiolata, Kaempferia sp. and S. kirkii. Siphonichilus decora produced no t-roots while C. thorelii produced the most t-roots at 16 hours. Vegetative growth of gingers grown in this study, except for C. thorelii, was maintained and increased at photoperiods of 16 and 20 hours.

Photoperiods of 8 and 12 hours induced dormancy and t-root production of most of these gingers.

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J.E. Erwin, R. Warner, T. Smith and R. Wagner

102 POSTER SESSION 4F (Abstr. 224–233) Photoperiod/Temperature/Growth—Floriculture

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Esther E. McGinnis, Alan G. Smith and Mary H. Meyer

factors influencing floral initiation and development were studied. The ability to manipulate flowering is a first step in developing commercial seed production protocols. Temperature and photoperiod are two of the most important environmental factors in

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Shi-Ying Wang, William H. Carlson and Royal D. Heins

102 POSTER SESSION 4F (Abstr. 224–233) Photoperiod/Temperature/Growth—Floriculture

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Aaron E. Walworth and Ryan M. Warner

nonfreezing temperatures, shortened photoperiods induce cold acclimation of many woody plant species ( Howell and Weiser, 1970 ; Li et al., 2002 ; Marian et al., 2004 ) and some herbaceous species such as Hordeum vulgare L. ‘Dicktoo’ ( Fowler et al., 2001

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A. Cutlan, J.E. Erwin, H. Huntington and J. Huntington

102 POSTER SESSION 4F (Abstr. 224–233) Photoperiod/Temperature/Growth—Floriculture

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John Erwin, Rene O’Connell and Ken Altman

colorful and/or uniquely shaped scions as potted plants ( Kim and Kim, 2006 ). Erwin (1996) subsequently researched temperature and photoperiod effects on grafted cacti growth to decrease scion losses. Little recent work has focused on desert cacti

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Anne Fennell and Emily Hoover

Abbreviations: KT, killing temperature; LD, long photoperiod; ND, natural photoperiod; SD, short photoperiod. 1 Present address: Plant Molecular Biology Center, Montgomery Hall, Northern Illinois Univ., Dekalb, IL 60115-2861. Science Journal Series

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Ariana P. Torres and Roberto G. Lopez

crop quality ( Erwin, 2009 ; Warner and Erwin, 2003 ). Tropical plants of equatorial origin are believed to be more sensitive to small differences in daylength (photoperiod) than those from temperate regions ( Sanford, 1974 ). Plant responses