Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "phosphorus uptake efficiency" x
Clear All
Free access

Andrew G. Ristvey, John D. Lea-Cox and David S. Ross

than 1.5% in the high P treatments of 25 mg/week. Phosphorus uptake efficiencies would have dropped to ≈20% for azaleas given the sufficient P rate of 5 mg/week compared with the calculated range of 40.1% to 49.2% ( Table 3 ). Interestingly, the uptake

Restricted access

María José Jiménez-Moreno and Ricardo Fernández-Escobar

nutrition, and also to determine phosphorus uptake efficiency (PUE). Materials and Methods Plant material and growth conditions. Mist-rooted ‘Picual’ olive cuttings were grown in 0.7-L pots filled with perlite during 8 to 12 months of acclimation, depending

Free access

William B. Evans and Darryl D. Warncke

Six potato cultivars (Atlantic, Sebago, Onaway, Russet Burbank, Lemhi Russet,and Norland) were evaluated for phosphorus uptake efficiency in solution culture. Individual rooted cuttings of each cultivar were transferred from a standard 1/5 Hoagland's solution into solutions containing one of six P concentrations (0.05,0.1,0.22,0.5,1.1 and 2.3mg/l). After a 24h adjustment period P uptake was followed over a 6h period by collecting solution aliquots every two hours. All cultivars depleted the two lowest initial P concentrations to similar stable P concentration. The P uptake rate per unit length of root showed a sigmoidal relationship to the initial P solution concentration. The general nature of the P uptake relation to solution P concentration was similar among the cultivars, although the actual values varied. In general, P uptake rate increased from 5.0 × 10-4 at the lowest concentration to 7.0 × 10-2μg·cm-1·h-1 at the highest P solution concentration.

Free access

James S. Owen Jr, Stuart L. Warren, Ted E. Bilderback and Joseph P. Albano

Production of containerized nursery crops requires high inputs of water and mineral nutrients to maximize plant growth to produce a salable plant quickly. However, input efficiencies remain below 50% resulting in major quantities of water and nutrients leached. This study was conducted to determine if production factors could be altered to increase water and phosphorus uptake efficiency (PUE) without sacrificing plant growth. The effects of a pine bark substrate amendment (clay or sand) and a 50% reduction in both P application rate (1.0 g or 0.5 g) and leaching fraction (LF = effluent ÷ influent) (0.1 or 0.2) were investigated. Containerized Skogholm cotoneaster (Cotoneaster dammeri Schnied. ‘Skogholm’) was grown on gravel floor effluent collection plots that allowed for calculation of water and nutrient budgets. Pine bark amended with 11% (by vol.) Georgiana 0.25 to 0.85 mm calcined palygorksite-bentonite mineral aggregate (clay) increased available water 4% when compared with pine bark amended with 11% (by volume) coarse sand. Decreasing LF from 0.2 to 0.1 reduced cumulative container influent 25% and effluent volume 64%, whereas total plant dry weight was unaffected by LF. Reduction of target LF from 0.2 to 0.1 reduced dissolved reactive P concentration and content by 8% and 64%, respectively. In a sand-amended substrate, total plant dry weight decreased 16% when 1.0× P rate was reduced to 0.5× P, whereas total plant dry weight was unaffected by rate of P when pine bark was amended with clay. Plant content of all macronutrients, with the exception of N, increased when pine bark was amended with clay versus sand. Reducing P rate from 1.0× to 0.5× increased PUE 54% or 11% in a clay or sand-amended substrate, respectively. Amending pine bark with 11% (by volume) 0.25 to 0.85 mm calcined palygorksite-bentonite mineral aggregate produced an equivalent plant with half the P inputs and a 0.1 LF, which reduced water use 25% and P effluent losses 42% when compared with an industry representative substrate [8 pine bark : 1 sand (11% by volume)].

Full access

Pedro García-Caparrós, Alfonso Llanderal and María Teresa Lao

(28% lower compared with the control), whereas phosphorus uptake efficiency (PUE) increased with higher EC (4.5 and 7.5 dS · m −1 ) (23% and 26%, respectively, compared with the control). Similarly, Ristvey et al. (2007) also reported an increase in

Restricted access

Jacob H. Shreckhise, James S. Owen Jr. and Alex X. Niemiera

). Phosphorus uptake efficiency of containerized crops improves with a marginal decrease in P fertilization amount ( Ku and Hershey, 1997 ; Lea-Cox and Ristvey, 2003 ; Owen et al., 2008 ; Ristvey et al., 2004 , 2007 ). Ristvey et al. (2007) , when growing

Free access

Rita L. Hummel, Marianne Elliott, Gary Chastagner, Robert E. Riley, Kathy Riley and Annie DeBauw

.5399/osu/fp.2.1.3036 Ristvey, A.G. Lea-Cox, J.D. Ross, D.S. 2007 Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake efficiency and partitioning of container-grown azalea during spring growth J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 132 563 571 Scagel, C.F. Bi, G. Fuchigami, L.H. Regan, R

Restricted access

Tongyin Li, Guihong Bi, Richard L. Harkess, Geoffrey C. Denny, Eugene K. Blythe and Xiaojie Zhao

. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 120 971 976 Ristvey, A.G. Lea-Cox, J.D. Ross, D.S. 2007 Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake efficiency and partitioning of container-grown azalea during spring growth J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 132 563 571 Scagel, C.F. Bi, G. Fuchigami, L

Restricted access

Daniel E. Wells, Jeffrey S. Beasley, Lewis A. Gaston, Edward W. Bush and Maureen E. Thiessen

: Theory and practice. Elsevier, Oxford, UK Ristvey, A.G. Lea-Cox, J.D. Ross, D.S. 2007 Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake efficiency and partitioning of container-grown azalea during spring growth J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 132 563 571 Schiemenz, K. Eichler

Free access

Andreas Westphal, Nicole L. Snyder, Lijuan Xing and James J. Camberato

–arbuscular mycorrhizae in vegetable crops HortScience 21 974 984 Miyasaka, S.C. Habte, M. 2001 Plant mechanisms and mycorrhizal symbioses to increase phosphorus uptake efficiency Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 32 1101 1147