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D.J. Schuster, T.F. Mueller, J.B. Kring, and J.F. Price

A new disorder of fruit has been observed on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) in Florida. The disorder, termed irregular ripening, was associated with field populations of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) and is characterized by incomplete ripening of longitudinal sections of fruit. An increase in internal white tissue also was associated with whitefly populations. In field cage studies, fruit on tomato plants not infested with the sweetpotato whitefly exhibited slight or no irregular ripening, whereas fruit from infested plants did. Fruit from plants on which a whitefly infestation had been controlled before the appearance of external symptoms exhibited reduced symptoms compared to fruit from plants on which an infestation was uncontrolled.

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John Speese III and S.B. Sterrett

acknowledge the contribution of chemicals for this study by FMC (permethrin and endosulfan), Gowan Company (phosmet), Bayer Corp. (imidacloprid), Abbott Laboratories (Btt), and Elf Atochem North America, Inc. (cryolite). Assistance in the field plots by Helene

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Brian A. Kahn and Lynn P. Brandenberger

permethrin (2.4 oz/acre) on 19 and 27 Sept. and 3 Oct. The design was a split-block with four replications. The two cultivars were planted in three-row strips across an entire block of pesticide treatment plots. Each pesticide treatment plot consisted of six

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Salvatore S. Mangiafico, Julie Newman, Donald J. Merhaut, Jay Gan, Ben Faber, and Laosheng Wu

·L −1 for bifenthrin, and 550 ng·L −1 for permethrin ( Mokry and Hoagland, 1990 ). A survey of 11 production nurseries in southern California found frequent detections of pyrethroid, organophosphate, and organochlorine insecticides in runoff entering

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Xin Zhao, Edward Carey, James Nechols, Kim Williams, and Weiqun Wang

Implications of dietary phenolic compounds for human health and disease prevention have been indicated by a body of literature. A greenhouse pot study was performed to investigate the impacts of fertilizer source and preventive insecticide application on phenolic compound levels in pac choi [Brassica rapa (L.) cv. Mei Qing]. A two-way randomized complete-block design with five replications was used in this experiment. Fertilizer source consisted of two levels: conventional fertilizer (pre-plant application of Osmocote slow-release fertilizer), and organic fertilizer (pre-plant application of vermicompost and fertigation with compost tea and fish emulsion). Insecticide application consisted of three levels: organic (pyrethrin) vs. conventional (permethrin), and a plain water control. At harvest, total phenolics and individual phenolic compounds in pac choi leaves (blades) were analyzed by Folin assay and HPLC, respectively. Head weight of pac choi was significantly higher under conventional fertilizer treatment, while it was not affected by insecticides. Total phenolic content of pac choi was significantly increased by organic fertilizer treatment. HPLC results indicated that organic fertilizer treatment resulted in significantly higher levels of individual phenolic compounds, including chlorogenic acid and ferulic acid. In contrast, preventive insecticide application showed little effect on the phenolics in pac choi. Correlation analysis excluded the influence of plant size (head weight) on phenolic content in pac choi. Differential N-forms, rates of nutrient release, and/or variable nutrient content in organic and conventional fertilizer treatments may contribute to elevated phenolic content in organically fertilized pac choi.

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Brian A. Kahn and John P. Damicone

. Foliar insecticides used included permethrin (Pounce; FMC Corp., Philadelphia, PA) at 225 g·ha −1 , esfenvalerate (Asana; DuPont, Wilmington, DE) at 34 g·ha −1 , and methomyl (Lannate; DuPont) at 560 g·ha −1 . Azoxystrobin (Quadris; Syngenta Crop

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Edward A. Evans, Jonathan Crane, Alan Hodges, and Jason L. Osborne

the beetle once established in an area nor be an economically viable solution to prevent further infestations. In addition, as a type of prophylactic treatment, growers have been advised to apply permethrin (Permethrin 3.2 AG; Arysta LifeScience North

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Beiquan Mou

permethrin and fenvalerate J. Econ. Entomol. 80 1262 1266 Parrella, M.P. 1987 Biology of Liriomyza Annu. Rev. Entomol. 32 201 224 Parrella, M.P. Trumble, J.T. 1989 Decline of

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Beiquan Mou and Edward J. Ryder

and Liriomyza trifolii ( Diptera:Agromyzidae ) to permethrin and fenvalerate J. Econ. Entomol. 80 1262 1266 Mou, B. Liu, Y.B. 2003 Leafminer resistance in lettuce HortScience 38 570 572

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Beiquan Mou

Susceptibility of Liriomyza sativae and Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae) to permethrin and fenvalerate J. Econ. Entomol. 80 1262 1266 Parrella, M.P. 1987 Biology of Liriomyza Annu. Rev. Entomol. 32 201 224