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Michael R. Evans and Mary M. Gachukia

atmosphere ( Bunt, 1988 ). Various materials are used to provide, at least in part, for air-filled pore space in substrates, with one of the most common being perlite ( Boertje and Arnold Bik, 1975 ; Bunt, 1988 ). Perlite is an inorganic, expanded

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Hanna Y. Hanna

Perlite is an excellent growing medium for many horticultural crops, including greenhouse tomatoes ( Szmidt et al., 1988 ). The initial rock found in nature is crushed to small pieces and heated to 1000 °C to evaporate the inside moisture and expand

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Michael R. Evans and Mary M. Gachukia

environment and the outside atmosphere. Various materials have been used to provide for air-filled pore space in substrates, with one of the most common being perlite ( Bunt, 1988 ). Perlite is an inorganic expanded aluminosilicate of volcanic origin ( Nelson

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Michael R. Evans and Leisha Vance

fiber before use in blending of the final root substrates. The 60 peat : 40 feather fiber composite was blended with additional sphagnum peat and composted pine bark (≈1 cm in diameter) or horticultural grade perlite to produce substrates that contained

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W. Garrett Owen, Brian E. Jackson, Brian E. Whipker and William C. Fonteno

The production of container-grown plants requires substrates that provide adequate chemical and physical properties. Traditional substrate mixes are formulated on a volume basis of peatmoss, vermiculite, perlite, and/or pine bark [PB ( Nelson, 2012

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Richard V. Tyson, Eric H. Simonne, Danielle D. Treadwell, James M. White and Amarat Simonne

, significantly reducing wasteful effluent discharges to the environment. However, with all its promise, limited information is available on nitrification rate in a perlite biofilter/root growth medium or on the interaction and competition between plant roots and

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Jeb S. Fields, William C. Fonteno, Brian E. Jackson, Joshua L. Heitman and James S. Owen Jr.

PTSs and to compare them with traditional components of perlite and peat. The second objective was to determine MRCs for mixtures of peat and either perlite, SPW, or PWCs. Identifying similarities and differences in hydraulic properties between the two

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Paraskevi A. Londra

floriculture perlite ( Londra, 2001 ). The peat was Lithuanian sphagnum peatmoss. The coir was in compressed form with dimensions 20 × 10 × 5 cm and was a byproduct of coconut husk fiber treatment. The peat-based substrate mixtures were created with (on a

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Huan Xiong, He Sun, Feng Zou, Xiaoming Fan, Genhua Niu and Deyi Yuan

half-strength MS medium containing 3.5% perlite, 0.65% agar, and 3% sucrose, supplemented with IBA (0.1, 0.5, or 1.5 mg·L −1 ) or NAA (0.1, 0.5, or 1.5 mg·L −1 ) ( Table 4 ). After 4 weeks in culture for root development, the surviving shoots were

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Mary M. Gachukia and Michael R. Evans

environment and the outside atmosphere. Various materials have been used to provide for air-filled pore space in substrates, with one of the most common being perlite ( Bunt, 1988 ). Perlite is an inorganic expanded aluminosilicate of volcanic origin ( Nelson