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James E. Altland, Charles Krause, James C. Locke and Wendy L. Zellner

Soilless substrates used in U.S. floriculture are comprised primarily of sphagnum peatmoss amended with perlite, vermiculite, pumice, and to a lesser extent sand, compost, and other components. Sphagnum peatmoss does not contain sufficient

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright and Nazim Gruda

Most all ornamental greenhouse crops ( Nelson, 2003 ) and all house/foliage plants are grown in containers. The basis for most container substrates is peatmoss, aged pine bark (PB), and more recently coconut coir. All of these materials are

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Magdalena Zazirska Gabriel, James E. Altland and James S. Owen Jr

porosity (TP), air space (AS), and container capacity (CC). The most common substrate components use in the Oregon nursery industry is douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. (Franco)] bark (DFB), sphagnum peatmoss, and pumice. Each of these individual

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Guihong Bi, Williams B. Evans and Glenn B. Fain

Growing substrates constitute one of the largest costs to growers in the greenhouse and nursery industries. Peatmoss is the primary component of many of these substrates, although it is associated with substantial transportation costs and is a

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Glenn B. Fain, Charles H. Gilliam, Jeff L. Sibley, Cheryl R. Boyer and Anthony L. Witcher

Peatmoss is the primary component of substrates in the production of greenhouse-grown herbaceous annual crops. Rising transportation cost of peatmoss from Canada or Europe is sure to affect the profitability of many greenhouse operators

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James E. Altland, James C. Locke, Wendy L. Zellner and Jennifer K. Boldt

The primary component in greenhouse potting substrates is sphagnum peatmoss. Substrate solution pH of nonamended peatmoss ranges from 4.0 to 4.5 ( Landis, 1990 ). Optimum substrate pH has been determined for economically important crops such as

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Jean-Yves Daigle

The general population is constantly reminded of the need to adopt a more environmental-friendly approach to waste disposal on all scales. Commercial fishing generates large proportions of waste, ranging from 40% to more than 80% of the catch! The objective of conserving the nutrients and other organic values contained in this type of waste is unlikely to be fully met by bulking for aerobic composting with materials of low buffering capacity, such as straw or wood wastes. However, the capacity of peat for deodorizing of decomposing organic wastes as well as its high buffering capacity has been well demonstrated. This presentation shows how the incorporation of sphagnum peatmoss in a composting process contributes significantly to the production of a valuable organic soil amendment.

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Anthony L. Witcher, Eugene K. Blythe, Glenn B. Fain and Kenneth J. Curry

in both experiments. Peatmoss has high water retention properties and is routinely used to enhance the container capacity of substrates used for crop production ( Robbins and Evans, 2005 ). Substrate air space between 15% and 40% is recommended for

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John J. Sloan, Raul I. Cabrera, Peter A.Y. Ampim, Steve A. George and Wayne A. Mackay

when the soil amendments are added to clay-textured soils, which are inherently more difficult to till than sandy- or loam-textured soils. Most of these products traditionally use pine bark (PB) and peatmoss (PM) as their major ingredients. Short

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Matthew D. Taylor, Rachel Kreis and Lidia Rejtö

Peatmoss is one of the most commonly used substrate components in the greenhouse and nursery industry and has been used since the 1960s ( Li et al., 2009 ; Shober et al., 2010 ). Currently, the environmental impacts of harvesting peatmoss are a