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Virginia I. Lohr and Caroline H. Pearson-Mims

A well-known research report showed that being in a hospital room with a view of trees rather than a view of a building was linked to the use of fewer pain-reducing medications by patients recovering from surgery. The experiment reported here was designed to further examine the role of plants in pain perception. We found that more subjects were willing to keep a hand submerged in ice water for 5 min if they were in a room with plants present than if they were in a room without plants. This was found to be true even when the room without plants had other colorful objects that might help the subject focus on something other than the discomfort. Results from a room assessment survey confirmed that the room with colorful, nonplant objects was as interesting and colorful as the room with plants present, but the presence of plants was perceived as making the air in the room fresher.

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Seong-Hyun Park and Richard H. Mattson

Surgery is a threatening experience with multiple stressful components such as physical pain and discomfort, worries about illness, isolation from family and friends, fear of medical procedures, and lack of familiarity with medical personnel

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Seong-Hyun Park and Richard H. Mattson

Appendectomy is an acute surgery characterized by localized abdominal pain requiring a relatively short hospitalization of up to 5 d. This is a comparatively standardized medical procedure with similar postoperative management in the uncomplicated

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Coleman L. Etheredge, Tina M. Waliczek, and Jayne M. Zajicek

indicate any recurring medical conditions from a list of 43 options. Examples of answers included, “dizziness,” “chest pain,” “trouble sleeping,” and “high cholesterol,” as well as a blank space to write in medical conditions not listed. This list was an

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Md. Aktar Hossain, Sooah Kim, Kyoung Heon Kim, Sung-Joon Lee, and Hojoung Lee

native to Europe. Its use as a medicinal herb dates from the Middle Ages, and it is very well known for its ability to reduce stress and anxiety, promote sleep, improve appetite, and ease pain and discomfort associated with digestion. Moreover, several

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Robert A. Norton

Abstract

Implementation as it applies to land use is the often painful process by which the “decision makers” go from an altruistic goal or plan for the community, state or nation, to positive action programs or regulations. In our culture where private land tenure is considered almost sacred, such action programs, designed for the many, may drastically affect the economic and social well-being of those intimately involved. We, as horticulturists, with our knowledge of the “ecological inventory” and our usually balanced judgment, recognizing both the economic and social needs of man, have an opportunity to make a contribution which can “ease the pain” in the planning and implementation process. In order to have an effective impact, we must be thoroughly familiar first with the methods by which land use plans are implemented and finally with those groups and individuals involved in planning and implementation.

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James W. Rushing, Robert J. Dufault, Richard L. Hassell, and B. Merle Shepard

Feverfew has aspirin-like properties and has been utilized for the treatment of pain, particularly migraine headache. Parthenolide is the sesquiterpene lactone believed to be responsible for the medicinal properties. The potential for utilizing existing tobacco production and handling systems for the production and postharvest handling of feverfew was investigated. In year one, 8 commercial tobacco growers each planted about one-half acre of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L. Schulz-Bip.). The yield of dry herb varied among farmers from about 122 to 772 (55 to 350 kg) pounds per half-acre. The parthenolide content of the dried herb from most producers was within the range desired by industry, but four factors precluded its salability: a) presence of foreign matter, primarily weeds; b) excessive ash content due to contamination from sandy soils; c) mold resulting from processing with excessive moisture content, and; d) insect infestation (tobacco beetles Lasioderma serricorne) during storage. All of these limitations resulted from the failure to implement good agricultural aractices (GAPs) and good manufacturing practices (GMPs) during production and handling of the product. A second planting of the feverfew was carried out with strict attention to GAPs and GMPs. In this trial, all of the dried feverfew met the requirements for sale. Here we report on the management of production and handling systems for feverfew that can enable growers to produce high quality herbs that meet the high standards for medicinal use.

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Paul W. Bosland, Danise Coon, and Peter H. Cooke

capsaicinoids, only found in the Capsicum genus, have the ability to elicit the sensation of a burning pain in mammals. The capsaicinoids are the most probable reason for the early adoption as a medicinal plant. The capsaicinoids have been traditionally used

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Sin-Ae Park, Candice A. Shoemaker, and Mark D. Haub

resulting from physical health, bodily pain, general health perceptions, vitality, social functioning, role limitations resulting from emotional problems, and mental health. It yields scale scores for each of these eight health domains and two summary

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Danielle E. Hammond, Amy L. McFarland, Jayne M. Zajicek, and Tina M. Waliczek

spent outdoors and parents' reports of itchy watery eyes, ear infection or earache, cough, headache, cold, sore throat, body pain or discomfort, constipation, loose bowels, or diarrhea, limitations riding a bike, running, or playing sports, repeated