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Krista C. Shellie

, USDA-ARS), Robert D. Meyer (chemist, USDA-ARS), and operators of participating packing sheds is greatly appreciated.

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John E. Fucik

The harvest of Rio Red grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) was “intercepted” at three stages: 1) unpicked fruit, 2) picked and carried to pallet box trailer, and 3) picked, carried, dumped in the pallet box and transported to the packing shed. Three harvesters picked fruit from four canopy locations on two trees each. At each intercept, half the fruit was dipped into a spore solution of green mold (Penicillium digitatum) and half left nontreated as controls. Intercept 1 fruit was dipped and left unpicked on the tree. After 10 days incubation, the rate of green mold infection and its location on the fruit was determined. Tests were run in May 1995 and Feb. and Apr. 1996. The rate of infection increased with each intercept, and treated fruit had 15 times the infection rate of the controls. The highest infection rate, 1.3%, occurred in May 1995 followed by Feb. (0.8%), and April (0.5%). Most infection sites appeared above and below the fruit's equator, rather than on its top or bottom exclusively. There were no effects associated with harvesters or the location of the fruit in the canopy.

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Yukari Murakami, Yoshihiko Ozaki, and Hidemi Izumi

was confirmed in our previous reports on ‘Fuyu’ persimmon fruit in the production field ( Izumi et al., 2008a ) and fruit-packing shed ( Izumi et al., 2008b ). Fig. 1. Counts of mesophiles ( A ) and fungi ( B ) of ‘Fuyu’ persimmon fruit during the

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Yuji Nakata and Hidemi Izumi

contamination for fruit are from soil, agricultural water, pesticide solution, and packing-shed equipment in different environments ( Izumi et al., 2008b , 2008c ). Because infection of B. cinerea can result from nesting, which is direct penetration of

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Rachel Leisso, Ines Hanrahan, and Jim Mattheis

fruit maturity at the time of harvest ( Tong et al., 2003 ; Watkins et al., 2003 ). The information regarding these treatments or field conditions is neither controlled by nor necessarily available to storage and packing sheds when fruit are received

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Robert E. Paull, Gail Uruu, and Nancy Jung Chen

study ( Fig. 1 ). Conclusions The digital acidity meter has the potential for use in commercial settings in the field before harvest and for quality control in the packing shed and during marketing. The meter has utility to measure pineapple acidity in a

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Florence A. Becot, Virginia Nickerson, David S. Conner, and Jane M. Kolodinsky

focused on five GAPs criteria: toilet and hand-washing facilities, hygiene training, packing shed or cooling pad sanitation, irrigation water, and crisis management. The additional costs associated with GAPs for bigger farms were $66/acre, while the costs

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Mikal E. Saltveit

packing shed within a few hours of harvest. Temperature treatments. Freshly excised segments were heat shocked by placing the six segments in a nylon mesh bag and immersing the bag in a water bath heated to 30 to 55 °C. The segments were then rinsed in

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Yiannis G. Ampatzidis and Matthew D. Whiting

, and bins are collected by tractor, loaded on a trailer, and delivered to a local packing shed for sorting, cleaning, and packaging. Intuitively, there are many factors that will affect harvest efficiency. These may be biological, technological, and

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Yukari Murakami, Yoshihiko Ozaki, and Hidemi Izumi

sources of microbial contamination of satsuma mandarin fruit in Japan, from production through packing shed J. Food Prot. 71 530 538 Kader, A.A. 2003 A summary of CA requirements and recommendations for fruits other than apples and pears Acta Hort. 600 737