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M. Sachs, D. J. Cantliffe, and T. A. Nell

Abstract

Germination rate of sand-coated pepper (Capsicum annum L.) seed (sand grain size < 75μm for an inner coat and 75–105 μm for an outer coat layer) was faster than clay-coated seed but was slower than raw seed. Part of the germination reduction in sand-coated seeds was caused by the water-soluble Gelvatol binder used. High oxygen (O2) levels promoted the germination of sand-coated seed to a rate comparable to that of raw seed. This suggests that even with a porous sand-coating material, O2 may be limiting for the germinating seed. When inorganic O2-releasing compounds (BaO2 or NaBO3) were incorporated into the sand material, the germination of pepper seed was further inhibited.

Open access

M. Sachs, D. J. Cantliffe, and T. A. Nell

Abstract

Seed germination of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is inhibited after the seed is coated. The inhibitory effect of pellet-coating of ‘Early Calwonder’ pepper seed was caused by the physical properties of the coating materials. Clay coating limited part of the oxygen (O2) from reaching the germinating seed and provided a mechanical barrier to protrusion of the radicle. Clay-coated pepper seed germinated satisfactorily on filter paper in a high O2 environment or with minimum moisture on agar. Pellet coating formulations which would provide more O2 to the imbibing seed would assure comparable germination of raw and coated sweet pepper seed.

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Szu-Chin Peng, Iou-Zen Chen, and Cheng-Yung Cheng

to 33 °C HortScience 32 129 131 10.21273/HORTSCI.32.1.129 Zimmerman, P.W. 1930 Oxygen requirements for root growth of cuttings in water Amer. J. Bot. 17 842 861 10.1002/j.1537-2197.1930.tb04926.x

Open access

Liang Zheng, Zibin Xiao, and Weitang Song

et al., 2009 ). Several previous studies have been performed to investigate the factors that influence the root formation in cutting propagation, including the effects of rooting auxin, storage temperature, light, and oxygen requirements ( Garrido et

Free access

Warley M. Nascimento, Jairo V. Vieira, Giovani O. Silva, Kathleen R. Reitsma, and Daniel J. Cantliffe

high temperatures during seed germination and early seedling growth involves acclimation effects such as synthesis of heat-shock proteins ( Vierling, 1991 ). Oxygen requirements for seed germination may also be modulated by temperature ( Bradford et al

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Adam Bolton, Aneela Nijabat, Muhammad Mahmood-ur-Rehman, Naima Huma Naveed, A.T.M. Majharul Mannan, Aamir Ali, Mohamed A. Rahim, and Philipp Simon

relatively little has been reported about the effects of high temperatures. Vieira et al. (2005) demonstrated that high temperature inhibits carrot seed germination. High temperature affects some physiological and biochemical processes like oxygen