Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "osmopriming" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

J.E. Warren and M.A. Bennett

Osmopriming has been shown to enhance seed performance by increasing germination rates and uniformity. Furthermore, these enhancements persist under less-than-optimum conditions, such as salinity, reduced water availability, and excessively high or low temperatures. Additional benefits include resistance to soil pathogens due to lower leachate levels and more rapid emergence. To augment these existing qualities, it would be advantageous to incorporate beneficial organisms that antagonize soil-borne diseases, combining the benefits of both systems into a single procedure. To accomplish this, processing tomato seeds (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. OH8245) were bioprimed in aerated –0.8 Mpa NaNO3 at 20°C for 4 days, at which time a mixture of nutrient broth, a defoaming agent, and beneficial bacteria that has been adjusted to the same osmotic potential is added. The bacteria used, Pseudomonas aureofaciens AB254, has been proved to control Pythium ultimum on a variety of crop seeds. After 7 days the seeds are removed having been primed and colonized with 105 colony forming units (cfu)/seed. In the absence of pathogen pressure, osmoprimed and bio-osmoprimed seeds performed similarly improving overall germination by 40% after 3 days, as well as low temperature (10–15°C) germination. However, when these seeds were sown in soilless media inoculated with P. ultimum, osmoprimed and bio-osmoprimed emergence was 57% and 74%, respectively, showing the improvements that these biologicals can provide. Thermogradient table results, storage tests, cfu/seed, and pathogen control will be discussed.

Free access

J.E. Warren and M.A. Bennett

Improved germination under unfavorable soil conditions is an important safeguard against yield losses in direct-seeded crops. Osmoprimed seed has been shown to provide earlier and more uniform germination as well as improve low temperature germination. These attributes combined with the reduced rates of damping-off associated with Pseudomonas aureofaciens AB254 creates a bioosmopriming seed treatment that provides rapid germination under a wider range of soil temperatures while exhibiting the disease resistance and improved growth associated with bacterial coatings. The objective of this work is to combine biopriming and osmopriming into one procedure, thus creating an environment for adequate seed hydration and rapid multiplication of beneficial bacteria which will thoroughly colonize the seed surface. Processing tomato seeds (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `OH8245') were bio-osmoprimed in aerated –0.8 MPa NaNO3 at 20°C for 4 days. On the fourth day, a mixture of nutrient broth, a defoaming agent, and bacteria that have been adjusted to the same osmotic potential is added. This is done so that the removal of seeds from the tank at the end of the 7-day treatment coincides with peak populations of bacteria. Pseudomonas aureofaciens AB254 multiplies very rapidly in this environment, with colony forming units for tomato averaging 4 × 105/seed. Results will also be reported for cucumber seed (Cucumis sativus L. `Score'), which were treated using a similar procedure. Bacterial populations per seed, germination characteristics and pathogen control will be discussed.

Free access

Sunitha Gurusinghe, Ann L.T. Powell, and Kent J. Bradford

While seed priming (hydration in water or osmotic solutions followed by drying) enhances seed germination performance, the longevity of primed seeds in storage often is reduced. Postpriming treatments including a reduction in seed water content followed by incubation at 37 or 40 °C for 2 to 4 h can substantially restore potential longevity in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds. These conditions might induce heat-shock proteins (hsp) that could be involved in the extension of seed longevity. The abundance of BiP (78 kD Binding Protein), hsp70 and class I small hsp in primed seeds subjected to postpriming treatments was examined to assess this possibility. BiP mRNA and protein amounts increased during postpriming heat treatments that extended longevity of tomato seeds. Treatment of primed seeds with the calcium ionophore calcimycin (A21387) enhanced BiP protein accumulation in the absence of heat treatment and also extended potential seed longevity. Changes in the abundance of hsp70 and class I small hsps were not consistently associated with potential seed longevity. Thus, enhanced BiP expression may contribute to the improved longevity of primed seeds following postpriming treatments.

Free access

Stanislav V. Magnitskiy, Claudio C. Pasian, Mark A. Bennett, and James D. Metzger

Shoot stretching in plug production reduces quality and makes mechanized transplanting difficult. The objectives of this study were to measure seedling emergence and shoot height of plugs as affected by paclobutrazol application during seed soaking, priming, or coating on seedling emergence and height. Verbena (Verbena ×hybrida Voss. `Quartz White'), pansy (Viola wittrockiana L. `Bingo Yellow Blotch'), and celosia (Celosia cristata L. `New Look') seeds were soaked in water solutions of paclobutrazol and subsequently dried on filter paper at 20 °C for 24 h. Soaking seeds in paclobutrazol solutions before sowing reduced growth and percentage seedling emergence of verbena and pansy but had little effect on those of celosia. Verbena seeds soaked in 50, 200, or 500 mg paclobutrazol/L for 5, 45, or 180 min produced fewer and shorter seedlings than controls. Osmopriming verbena seeds with 10 to 500 mg paclobutrazol/L reduced seedling emergence. Seedling height and emergence percentage of pansy decreased with increasing paclobutrazol concentrations from 2 to 30 mg·L–1 and with soaking time from 1 to 5 min. The elongation of celosia seedlings was reduced by soaking seeds in 10, 50, 200, or 500 mg paclobutrazol/L solutions for 5, 180, or 360 min. However, these reductions were negligible and without any practical application.

Open access

Kun Jia, Michelle DaCosta, and J. Scott Ebdon

partitioned as 1) Control (water primed + no water priming) vs. all other primers; 2) Water-priming vs. no priming; 3) Hormone (ABA + GA) vs. osmopriming (GB + PEG); 4) ABA vs. GA, 5) GB vs. PEG; and 6) H 2 O 2 vs. ABA + GA + GB + PEG. The 10 df for priming

Open access

Anna J. Talcott and William R. Graves

germination in P. trifoliata , the need for a more precise procedure exists, and there is no information about the germination of seeds of P. crenulata . Soaking seeds in water with dissolved polyethylene glycol (PEG), called osmopriming, has been used to

Free access

Clíssia Barboza da Silva, Julio Marcos-Filho, Pablo Jourdan, and Mark A. Bennett

transduction Annu. Rev. Plant Biol. 55 373 399 Ashraf, M. 2009 Biotechnological approach of improving plant salt stress using antioxidants as markers Biotechnol. Adv. 27 84 93 Ashraf, M. Bray, C.M. 1993 DNA synthesis in osmoprimed leek ( Allium porrum L

Free access

Qi Zhang and Kevin Rue

Biochemical process during the osmopriming of seeds, p. 767–789. In: Kigel, J. and G. Galili (eds.). Seeds development and germination. Marcel Dekker, New York, NY, Basel, Switzerland, Hong Hong Carrow, R.N. Duncan, R.R. 1998 Salt-affected turfgrass sites

Free access

Sang In Shim, Jun-Cheol Moon, Cheol Seong Jang, Paul Raymer, and Wook Kim

.A. Ashraf, M. Taylor, R.M. 1989 Biochemical changes during osmopriming of leek seeds Ann. Bot. (Lond.) 36 185 193 Bush, E.W. Wilson, P. Shepard, D.P. McClure, G. 2000 Enhancement of

Full access

Yan-Ling Zheng and Huan-Cheng Ma

although the fraction of seed reserve depletion improved with drought in seeds subjected to osmopriming, seed reserve utilization efficiency declined. The different change pattern of seed reserve utilization may be related to plant species and treatment