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David Byrne

Fruit and ornamental breeders were surveyed about their use of molecular markers in either their breeding programs or in their related research programs. Responses were obtained from over 100 fruit and ornamental breeding programs from throughout the world. Of these, less than 50% used molecular markers in their programs. The two most common uses of these markers were for studies in plant identification and diversity. These were followed by the use of markers in developing molecular maps, in discovering molecular tags and/or trying to identify the genes for specific plant traits, for marker assisted selection, and finally, for the elucidation of plant taxonomy. In conclusion, although there is much research in this area, few programs are actually using markers in the context of an applied breeding program. The major reason for this situation is the lack of available markers and the cost of using these markers to screen large numbers of progeny. Those that use markers in their breeding tend to use them to verify the genotype of the parents or confirm the genotype of selected seedlings rather than screen unselected seedlings.

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Hsuan Chen, Lan Xue, Tong Li and Ryan N. Contreras

hybrid plant species ( Yoon et al., 2006 ); in our case, the partial fertility might be valuable for ornamental plant breeding projects. Genetic control ( Brubaker et al., 1993 ), abnormal ploidy in gametes such as aneuploidy or unreduced gametes ( Karlov

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D.J. Norman, J.M.F. Yuen and R.J. Henny

One cut-flower and 14 pot anthurium cultivars were screened for resistance to anthurium blight by spraying four isolates of Xanthomonas campestris pv. dieffenbachiae (McCulloch and Pirone) Dye onto leaf surfaces in replicated experiments. Varying degrees of resistance were observed among the 15 cultivars tested. The pot cultivars Julia and Gemini were the most resistant, while the cut-flower cultivar Hearts Desire was the most susceptible. Each cultivar displayed different degrees of resistance to individual isolates of the pathogen. The results of this research permit the selection of clones with greater resistance for use in breeding and also create a baseline for comparing resistance of newly developed cultivars.

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Sandra M. Reed

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Mi-Young Chung, Jae-Dong Chung, Jaap Van Tuyl and Ki-Byung Lim

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Richard T. Olsen and Thomas G. Ranney

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Erik C. Fargo and Jeffrey A. Adkins

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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James McConnell

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Maria Cantor

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Bruce L. Dunn and Jon T. Lindstrom

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.