Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 103 items for :

  • "offflavor" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Yasar Karakurt, Donald J. Huber, and Wayne B. Sherman

Some nonmelting flesh (NMF) peaches develop a characteristic off-flavor during postharvest ripening. A study was conducted using NMF genotypes from the Univ. of Florida breeding program to investigate the off-flavor development in melting flesh (MF) and NMF peach genotypes and to determine the compositional changes associated with the development of off-flavor during postharvest ripening at 8 °C. The study revealed that there were certain chemical components that were consistently associated with the occurrence of off-flavor. Generally, there was a significant increase in total soluble phenolics, polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activity and ethanol content with the increase in the percentage of off-flavored fruit with time in storage at 8 °C in NMF genotypes examined. However, total sugars and total soluble solids decreased significantly during the storage period. These changes in chemical composition of NMF genotypes were not observed in MF genotypes, which did not show off-flavor development. Moreover, highly significant linear correlations were detected between off-flavor development and soluble phenolics, PPO activity, ethanol content, total soluble solids, and sugars in Fla. 92-21C and USDA 87P285, which had the highest percentage of off-flavored fruit. Specifically, soluble phenolics, chlorogenic acid, PPO activity, and ethanol were positively correlated, but soluble sugars and soluble solids were negatively correlated with the off-flavor development. Thus, it is suggested that the accumulation of soluble phenolic compounds and ethanol, and the reduction of soluble solids and sugars contribute to the of off-flavor in NMF genotypes.

Free access

Jennifer R. DeEll and Robert K. Prange

Postharvest quality and sensory attributes of organically and conventionally grown `McIntosh' and `Cortland' apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) stored at 3C in ambient air or in controlled atmospheres were evaluated. Organically grown apples had higher soluble solids concentration than conventionally grown apples, while there were no significant differences in firmness or titratable acids content. Organically grown `McIntosh' were perceived by sensory panelists as firmer than conventionally grown `McIntosh' at harvest but not after storage, which may have been due to maturity differences. No significant differences were perceived in juiciness, sweetness, tartness, and off-flavor of apples at harvest or after storage.

Free access

Eliahou Cohen, Yavin Shalom, and Ida Rosenberger

Britex and Zivdar, water-based polyethylene waxes, were applied in commercial and experimental formulations as spray coating, a single dip, or double dips on `Murcott' tangerine (Citrus reticulate Blanco) fruits. Postharvest waxing of `Murcott' tangerine reduced weight loss but affected the sensory characteristics of the fruit. Charges in fruit weight loss and juice composition occurred in the waxed fruits after 4 weeks of storage at 5C plus 1 week of simulated retail handling at 17C. Changes in internal fruit atmosphere were related to fruit flavor quality.

Free access

Pimjai Seehanam, Danai Boonyakiat, and Nithiya Rattanapanone

of off-flavor, which can be adversely affected by the coating for reasons related to permeation of gases through the peel ( Hagenmaier, 2002 ; Hagenmaier and Baker, 1993 ). If anaerobic conditions occur, an excessive build-up of volatile compounds

Open access

Marcela Miranda, Xiuxiu Sun, Christopher Ference, Anne Plotto, Jinhe Bai, David Wood, Odílio Benedito Garrido Assis, Marcos David Ferreira, and Elizabeth Baldwin

of the fruit internal atmosphere, causing fruit to produce high levels of ethanol and acetaldehyde, leading to off-flavor and trapping off-flavors within the fruit ( Baldwin et al., 1999 ). In general, fruit produce a collection of volatile compounds

Free access

Malkeet S. Padda and David H. Picha

sweetpotato tissue showed a rapid increase and decrease, respectively. The O 2 levels in all bags after 8 d of storage were sufficient to avoid anaerobic respiration and no visual decay, off-odors, or off-flavors developed. Previously, McConnell et al. (2005

Free access

Barbara J. Daniels-Lake, Robert K. Prange, Sonia O. Gaul, Kenneth B. McRae, Roberto de Antueno, and David McLachlan

“musty.” A preliminary gas chromatographic–mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of three OFO-affected potato samples indicated the presence of several “off-flavor” compounds, including 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), 2-methyl-isoborneol, and geosmin (P. Silk

Free access

Theeranuch Chantrachit and Daryl G. Richardson

Ripening bananas (color stage 5) were placed in closed jars held at 20°C. Nitrogen (99.99%, 100 ml/min) or air were flowed through the jars. SPME (Solid Phase Micro Extraction) was used for sampling dynamic headspace and analyzed by GC-MS and GC-FID. Several volatile compounds decreased with time in the nitrogen treatment. Production of isobutyl butyrate, 3-methyl-1-butanol, methyl heptanoate, pentyl acetate, and 2-pentanol which were present in air treatments, were absent in the nitrogen treatment. Ethanol rapidly increased until the last day. Off-flavors were detected by most panelists after three days of N2 treatment and off-flavors increased in the following days. Reversibility of off-flavor after exposing the bananas to air was not detected by panelists. Correlations were low between the main compounds in the nitrogen treatment and the off-flavor score.

Free access

Robert J. Porting, Carl E. Sams, William S. Conway, Jimmie L. Collins, and Marjorie P. Penfield

`Golden Delicious' and `Red Rome' apples were pressure infiltrated (69 kPa for 2 or 4 min) at harvest with 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4%, and 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8% CaCl2 solutions (w/v), respectively, and placed in 0°C storage. Juice was extracted from the apples after 0, 2, 4 or 6 months in storage. Sensory evaluation of the juice was conducted to determine if CaCl2 concentration affected color, off-flavors, suspended particles or overall acceptability of the juice. Juice color was judged lighter with increased CaCl2 in both cultivars. Detection of off-flavors decreased as CaCl2 was increased in juice from `Red Rome'; whereas, off-flavors increased as CaCl2 was increased in `Golden Delicious' juice. CaCl2 treatments decreased suspended particles in both cultivars. As CaCl2 was increased overall acceptability of juice from `Red Rome' increased, while acceptability of juice from `Golden Delicious' decreased.

Free access

Robert J. Porting, Carl E. Sams, William S. Conway, Jimmie L. Collins, and Marjorie P. Penfield

`Golden Delicious' and `Red Rome' apples were pressure infiltrated (69 kPa for 2 or 4 min) at harvest with 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4%, and 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8% CaCl2 solutions (w/v), respectively, and placed in 0°C storage. Juice was extracted from the apples after 0, 2, 4 or 6 months in storage. Sensory evaluation of the juice was conducted to determine if CaCl2 concentration affected color, off-flavors, suspended particles or overall acceptability of the juice. Juice color was judged lighter with increased CaCl2 in both cultivars. Detection of off-flavors decreased as CaCl2 was increased in juice from `Red Rome'; whereas, off-flavors increased as CaCl2 was increased in `Golden Delicious' juice. CaCl2 treatments decreased suspended particles in both cultivars. As CaCl2 was increased overall acceptability of juice from `Red Rome' increased, while acceptability of juice from `Golden Delicious' decreased.