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Luther Waters Jr., Bonnie L. Blanchette, Rhoda L. Burrows, and David Bedford

High levels of sphagnum peat in the growing medium promoted growth of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L. cv. Viking 2K) in a greenhouse study. Application of NH4NO3 > 1 g/pot (84 kg·ha-1 equivalent) was detrimental to root growth. High N rates and high organic matter levels decreased fibrous root development. Shoot dry weight was highly correlated with fleshy root number, root dry weight, and shoot vigor.

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Willie O. Chance III and Harry A. Mills

Mature zucchini squash plants (Cucurbita pepo L.) were grown under four NO3:NH4 ratios (1:0, 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3) to determine effects on macronutrient nutrition. Plants were grown in solution culture under greenhouse conditions. Treatments were applied at first bloom. Highest uptake of Ca and Mg occurred in the 1:0 NO3:NH4 treatment while higher K uptake was found in the 3:1 NO3:NH4 treatment. Total nitrogen uptake was greatest in the 1:1 and 3:1 NO3:NH4 treatments. A 3:1 NO3:NH4 ratio applied at first bloom gave best overall uptake of N, K, Ca, and Mg.

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Willie O. Chance III and Harry A. Mills

Mature zucchini squash plants (Cucurbita pepo L.) were grown under four NO3:NH4 ratios (1:0, 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3) to determine effects on macronutrient nutrition. Plants were grown in solution culture under greenhouse conditions. Treatments were applied at first bloom. Highest uptake of Ca and Mg occurred in the 1:0 NO3:NH4 treatment while higher K uptake was found in the 3:1 NO3:NH4 treatment. Total nitrogen uptake was greatest in the 1:1 and 3:1 NO3:NH4 treatments. A 3:1 NO3:NH4 ratio applied at first bloom gave best overall uptake of N, K, Ca, and Mg.

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Bill B. Dean

Washington State Univ. Tri-Cities offers a new agricultural degree program titled Integrated Cropping Systems. It is intended to provide a basic education on the fundamentals of crop production and the environmental context in which crops are grown. Courses are offered at the upper division level to interface with the lower division courses offered at local community colleges. The curriculum is composed of courses in environmental science, ecology and conservation as well as crop growth and development, crop nutrition, plant pathology integrated pest management and others. Students need to meet the same requirements as those at other Washington State Univ. campuses in regards to the general education requirements. The purpose of the Integrated Cropping Systems program is to provide an educational opportunity for agricultural professionals and others in the region who are unable to commute or move to the main campus location. The curriculum provides the background needed for such occupations as grower/producer, crop scouting, sales representative and other entry level agricultural professions. It will supply credits toward certification through the American Registry of Certified Professional Agricultural Consultants (ARCPACS). Integrated Cropping Systems is a unique agricultural curriculum designed to help agriculturists integrate their production practices into the local ecosystem in a way that the environment does not incur damage. It emphasizes the use of environmentally conscience decisionmaking processes and sound resource ethics. The program will graduate individuals who have heightened awareness of the impact agricultural practices have on the ecosystem in which they are conducted.

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Allen V. Barker

useful to anyone who is interested in teaching, research, or extension in plant nutrition, plant diseases, or in both topics. Allen V. Barker Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences University of Massachusetts Amherst

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Chao Dong, Xue Li, Yue Xi, and Zong-Ming Cheng

ornamental, medicinal, and nutritional plant ( Fico et al., 2000 ; Potter et al., 2007 ). The plant is commonly used in commercial landscapes because of its abundant small, bright, showy red berries, open habit, and small, attractive white flowers. It is

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Mikal E. Saltveit

, and they are distributed among the departments of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology and Nematology, Food Science and Technology, Nutrition, Plant Pathology, Plant Sciences, Viticulture and Enology

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Chang-Tsern Chen, Ching-Lung Lee, and Der-Ming Yeh

Plant Soil 8 337 353 Kirkby, E.A. Mengel, K. 1967 Ionic balance in different tissues of the tomato plant in relation to nitrate, urea, or ammonium nutrition Plant Physiol. 42 6 14 Liu, M. Zhang, A.J. Chen, X.G. Jin, R. Li, H.M. Tang, Z.H. 2017 The effect

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David H. Suchoff, Christopher C. Gunter, and Frank J. Louws

nitrogen nutrition Plant Soil 286 7 19 Ho, M.D. Rosas, J.C. Brown, K.M. Lynch, J.P. 2005 Root architectural tradeoffs for water and phosphorus acquisition Funct. Plant Biol. 32 737 748 Huang, B. Eissenstat, D.M. 2000 Linking hydraulic conductivity to

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Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi, Geoffrey Matthew Weaver, Marc W. van Iersel, and Roberto Testezlaf

and flowering of subirrigated petunias and begonias HortScience 36 40 44 Johnstone, G.R. 1950 Simplified equipment for subirrigation experiments in plant nutrition Plant Physiol. 25 185 186 Johnstone, G.R. 1952 Further studies in the simplification of