Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • "nutrient recirculation" x
Clear All
Free access

D. Sean Moodv and Douglas A. Hopper

Four cut rose cultivars (`Royalty', `Samantha', `Sonia', and `Gabriella') were exposed to supplemental radiation for 2 years of production at the W.D. Holley Plant Environmental Research Center (PERC) at Colorado State Univ. and 1 year at Jordan's Greenhouse (cultivars Royalty and Kardinal). At PERC the house was divided into two treatments: l) natural light, and 2) supplemental radiation at ≈100 μmol·m–2·s–1 (750 fc) from 1000-W high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps for 10 h each night. Jordan's had a third treatment of supplemental radiation at ≈50 μmol·m–2·s–1 (400 fc). Nutrient solution recirculation was tested with one bench in each of the treatments. Each rose was counted and measured for stem length and fresh weight. At PERC, all the cultivars showed no significant differences in the weekly number of flowers produced or the total flower fresh weight when grown under nonrecirculation vs. recirculation of nutrient solution. From 1993 results, grade A production for 60 `Royalty' plants increased from 455 flowers under natural conditions to 522 flowers under lighted conditions over 7 months, a 97-flower increase (21%) due to lighting.

Free access

Youbin Zheng, Thomas Graham, Stefan Richard and Mike Dixon

To determine whether currently used commercial nutrient solution concentrations can be reduced during the final stage (last 4 to 5 weeks) of production of potted gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii `Shogun') under recirculating subirrigation conditions, plants were grown under one of four nutrient levels (10%, 25%, 50%, and 100% of full strength). Nutrient concentration levels did not affect leaf area, flower number and appearance, and plant total dry weight. There were no significant differences in the greenness (as measured by SPAD meter) of leaves from plants that received the 50% and 100% strength nutrient solutions. However, leaves from plants that received the 10% and 25% strength solution showed significantly less greenness than that of the plants that received 50% and 100% strength nutrient solutions. There were interveinal chlorosis symptoms on the younger leaves of some plants in the 10% and 25% strength nutrient treatments. It is suspected that this interveinal chlorosis was due to iron (Fe) deficiency caused by the increased substrate pH. It is concluded that the nutrient solution concentrations typically used for potted gerbera production in commercial greenhouses at the final stage (4 to 5 weeks) under recirculating subirrigation conditions, can be safely reduced by at least 50% without adversely affecting crop production. Nutrient salts accumulated in the top section of the growth substrate under all treatments levels; however, no phytotoxic effects were observed. No differences in water use (141 mL per plant per day) were observed amid the various nutrient levels. Fertilizer inputs were reduced in the 50%, 25%, and 10% treatments by 54%, 75%, and 90% respectively, relative to the 100% treatment. After 4 weeks under recirculating conditions, the qualities of the nutrient solutions were still within acceptable limits.

Free access

Youbin Zheng, Diane Feliciano Cayanan and Mike Dixon

To determine the optimum feeding nutrient solution concentrations for the production of potted miniature roses (Rosa chineersis minima ‘Fall Festival’) under recirculating subirrigation conditions, plants were grown under four different nutrient solution concentrations [25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the full strength with an electrical conductivity (EC) of 1.756 dS·m−1]. Nutrient solution concentrations affected the stem, root, and plant total dry weight and flower and branch number. Under the 75% strength nutrient solution, these growth parameters were equal to or better than the 100% strength solution. No difference was detected in the chlorophyll content of leaves from plants that received the 50%, 75%, and 100% strength solutions during the experiment but at Day 35; only the 25% treatment had significantly lower leaf chlorophyll content than the other treatments. There were no treatment effects on the measured total foliar nutrient contents [except potassium (K)] of plants under the 75% strength solution compared with those under the 100% treatment, but nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and/or iron (Fe) of plants under the 25% strength solutions were below that of the acceptable range. Interveinal chlorosis and/or reddish leaves and branches were also apparent in plants under the 25% and 50% strength solutions. It is suspected that these are symptoms of N, P, and Fe deficiencies caused by the reduced nutrient solution concentrations and increased pH of the growing substrate. There were significant depletions of N and P nutrients in the 25% and 50% strength solutions at the end of the experiment, which was consistent with visual symptoms and deficiencies. Nutrient salts accumulated in the top section of the growing substrate under all treatments, but no phytotoxic effects were observed. The EC values for the top third of the growing substrate were much higher than those of the bottom two-thirds. EC for the top layer of the 100% treatment exhibited a fourfold increase compared with the bottom layer of that treatment. The NO3 , K, magnesium, and calcium for the top layer of the 100% treatment were 235%, 149%, 287%, and 245%, respectively, higher compared with the bottom layer of the 100% treatment. It was concluded that the nutrient solution concentrations typically used for potted miniature rose production in most of the Canadian greenhouses under recirculating subirrigation conditions can be safely reduced to 75% and produce better plants.

Free access

Yan Chen, Regina P. Bracy, Allen D. Owings and Donald J. Merhaut

the end of a growing season to avoid releasing nutrients back into the water, and new growth will begin the next season to continue removing nutrients from the water. A hydroponic nutrient recirculation system (NRS) was used for this study. The water

Free access

Xiuling Tian and Youbin Zheng

may explain why no increased soil- or water-borne disease incidences were observed in southern Ontario greenhouses that have adopted nutrient recirculation technologies ( Richard et al., 2006 ). These results indicate that increasing beneficial