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Damon E. Abdi and R. Thomas Fernandez

nursery is often applied daily using overhead impact sprinklers ( Beeson and Knox, 1991 ; Fulcher and Fernandez, 2013a ; Paudel et al., 2016 ). Overhead irrigation provides water to the entire nursery production surface—the containerized plants and the

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Bridget K. Behe, Jennifer H. Dennis, Charles R. Hall, Alan W. Hodges and Robin G. Brumfield

wholesale value of nursery plants in 2006 in 17 states surveyed was $4.65 bn with 7292 producers and 471,106 acres in production ( USDA, National Ag Statistics Service, 2007b ). Four product categories accounted for 58% of nursery production: broadleaf

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Benjamin L. Green, Richard W. Harper and Daniel A. Lass

researchers have speculated that nursery production methods may not significantly limit transplant survival and plant performance ( Levinsson, 2013 ). Factors like tree species selection ( Ferrini and Nicese, 2006 ), size ( Struve et al., 2000 ), transplant

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Tongyin Li, Guihong Bi, Genhua Niu, Susmitha S. Nambuthiri, Robert L. Geneve, Xueni Wang, R. Thomas Fernandez, Youping Sun and Xiaojie Zhao

traditional plastic container, consistent with results from some greenhouse studies growing bedding plants in biocontainers ( Koeser et al., 2013a ; Kuehny et al., 2011 ; Lopez and Camberato, 2011 ) and aboveground nursery production ( Wang et al., 2015

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Gerard Krewer, Esendugue Greg Fonsah, Mark Rieger, Richard Wallace, David Linvill and Ben Mullinix

cultivars for trial in home garden and nursery production. Observations on edible fruit production during the first 3 years were also noted. Materials and methods Cultural techniques. The experiment was conducted at the University of Georgia Bamboo Farm

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Seon-Kyu Kim and Dong-Yong Choi

All possible grafting combinations of seven roostock s and six scion cultivars were made to evaluate the rootstock/scion compatibility in grapevine nursery production. Percentage of takes was variable from 20.5%(Uni Blanc/161-49 C.) to 87.3%(K 188-2/161-49 C). Among scion cultivars, mean percentage of takes varied from 82.5%(K 188-2) to 37.5%(Ugni Blanc) while roostocks with all scion cultivars varied from 69.9%(R 110) to 52.8%(101-14 Mgt.), indicating the greater effects of scion on percentage of takes. Variation in rooting index(0: none to 4:profuse rooting scale) was from 3.48(SV 5276/Rip. Gloire). 3.49(Neo Muscat/101-14 Mgt.) to 1.63(SV 5276/161-49 C). Mean rooting index of rootstocks with all scion cultivars varied from 3.10(101-14 Mgt.) to 1.95(161-49 C.) while that of scion cultivars varied from 3.07(SV 5276) to 2.44(Ugni Blanc). In rooted grafting, rootstock had a greater effect than scion cultivars.

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Gary R. Bachman and Ted Whitwell

Demand for commercially grown Uniola paniculata L. (southern seaoats) is increasing for use in restoring beaches damaged by tropical storms. Fresh seeds harvested from the Jekyll Island, Ga area (with permission of the Jekyll Island Authority), were planted in 50 peat: 50 perlite and treated with 100 or 500 ppm GA4 for 24 h. Germination was higher for 100 compared to 500 ppm GA4. Liners grown from seed and planted with the crowns even with the surface of the pine bark-sand media, compared to deep planting to simulate burial conditions of beach planting, had the highest shoot and root weights after 100 days. Uniola paniculata liners with the crowns buried had reduced weights due to higher moisture conditions in the bottom of the containers. Uniola paniculata grown without supplemental fertilization had shoot weights similar to those of plants receiving 1.5 lb N/yd3 (0.89 kg N/m3) from both quick or slow release fertilizers. Increasing N to 3 lb/yd3 (1.78 kg N/m3) and/or supplying micronutrients only, reduced shoot weight. Nursery production of Uniola paniculata in pine bark-sand is one way to increase the supply of this important dune plant.

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Amy Fulcher, Dava Hayden and Winston Dunwell

The objectives of Kentucky's Sustainable Nursery Production Practices Extension Program are for 1) the Kentucky nursery industry to continue sustained growth and 2) Kentucky growers to produce high quality plants, efficiently use pesticides, be stewards of their land and Kentucky's environment. Sustainable Nursery Program Components are 1) Integrated Pest Management (IPM): Nursery Scouting, Scout Training and Scouting Education for growers, Extension workers, and students; 2) Best Management Practice (BMP) Workshops: BMP VI: Disease Demolition Workshop; 3) Production Practice Demonstration: Pruning Training, Pesticide Handling, and Safety and Environmental Stewartship. 4.) Research: Pruning protocols; Media and media amendments; Precision Fertilization and Irrigation. The Kentucky Nursery Crops Scouting Program scouting guidelines were developed and contained: a weekly scouting/trapping guide; a listing of which pests to look for and on what host plants, and a detailed methodology of precisely how to look for the pest, its damage, and how to record this information such that comparisons could be made across nurseries and seasons.

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Sally M. Schneider and Bradley D. Hanson

California phytosanitary regulations for fruit and nut plant nursery production require preplant fumigation with specified treatments for control of parasitic nematodes before nursery stock can be certified and sold [ California Department of Food

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Gerard Krewer, Esendugue Greg Fonsah, Mark Rieger, Richard Wallace, David Linvill and Ben Mullinix

Bananas are a popular ornamental plant in the southern U.S. However, normally only a few cultivars, such as `Lady Finger' and `Orinoco', are grown in Georgia. Thirty-three primarily commercial cultivars of bananas were grown for two years near Savannah, Georgia to determine their suitability for ornamental and nursery production. Most plants were grown from tissue culture plugs. They where given rates of fertilization used for commercial banana fruit production. Most cultivars produced 10 to 14 leaves and grew to heights of 1.5 to 2.0 m. Some displayed desirable ornamental characteristics such as pink tinted pseudostems, colorful flowers, and large graceful leaves. Many of the cultivars flowered and began producing fruit in late summer, although only `1780', `Raja Puri' and `Sweetheart' produced palatable fruit before frost in November in some years. Cultivars were also rated for their ability to produce suckers that can be used for nursery production. In year two, `1780' and `Manzano' produced the largest number of high quality suckers for nursery production. For the planting as a whole, sales of suckers at a field day averaged $7/per plant in year 2 and $17/per plant in year 3.