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Diana R. Cochran, Charles H. Gilliam, Glenn Fain and Robert D. Wright

Poster Session 26—Nursery Crops 2 29 July 2006, 12:00–12:45 p.m.

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Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

To meet growing consumer demand for nursery crops in North America, container nursery crop production has intensified over the last 30 years ( Davidson et al., 1988 ; Statistics Canada, 2013 ; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2006 ). Container

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright and John R. Seiler

materials evaluated in recent decades. Successful growth of woody nursery crops in wood substrates have been reported using several wood materials, including cedar chips ( Brown and Emino, 1981 ), pruning and forest residue wastes ( Riviere and Milhau, 1983

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Thomas Holt, Brian Maynard and William Johnson

Constructed wetlands are an effective, low-cost method of water treatment that may reduce agricultural pollutants from nursery runoff. It has been suggested that the expense of implementing such systems could be recovered by growing aquatic plants that could be sold to retail and wholesale markets. However, this demand could probably be satisfied through a few wetlands. It would be desirable if more traditional nursery crops could be incorporated into treatment wetlands. Several taxa of Cannas, Iris, and ornamental grasses are selected cultivars of wetland plants that have been used in treatment wetlands for decades. However little data exists on these cultivar's nutrient uptake rates and survivability in treatment wetlands. Nutrient uptake and growth rates of Canna × generalis cultivars `Aflame', `King Humbert', and `Pretoria', Glyceria maxima `Variegata', Iris pseudacorus, Iris versicolor, Phalaris arundinacea `Luteo-Picta', Pragmites australis `Variegata', and Spartina pectinata `Aureo-marginata' were compared to the widely used Typha latifolia. Single divisions of each were established in a constructed wetland and batch fed weekly a commercial fertilizer solution reconstituted to 100 ppm-N. Plants were harvested after 75 days and biomass and tissue nutrient content was determined. Mean biomass of Typha latifolia was 212 g/division and nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation was 4.5 and 0.8 g/division, respectively. The biomass of the other species ranged from 101 to 175 g/division and had total accumulation of nutrients ranging from 2.5 to 3.8 g nitrogen/division and 0.35 to 0.85 g phosphorus/division.

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Shital Poudyal and Bert M. Cregg

growers. This hinders the adoption of water capturing and recycling technologies. Potential problems with irrigating nursery crops with runoff include water quality, introduction (or reintroduction) of fungal pathogens, and potential damage to crops from

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Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

Early-season leaching of nutrients is a concern during container nursery crop production in many countries including the United States, Canada, Italy, and Spain ( Alam et al., 2009 ; Narvaez et al., 2012 ; Newman et al., 2006 ; Zanin et al., 2011

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Joseph P. Albano, James Altland, Donald J. Merhaut, Sandra B. Wilson and P. Chris Wilson

, 1996 ; Kidder and Hanlon Jr., 1997 ). Surprisingly, little information outside of technical bulletins is available for assessing the long-term effects of irrigation water acidification on nursery crops. A commercial nursery located in Fort Pierce, FL

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Janet C. Cole, Roger Kjelgren and David L. Hensley

Nursery crops have traditionally been grown in the field and harvested as balled and burlapped or bareroot plants or grown in above-ground containers. A relatively recent product, the in-ground fabric container, has allowed producers to combine advantages of field production with those of container production. The effect of these containers on plant growth, transplant establishment, plant chemical composition, and water relations appears to be species and site specific.

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Sven E. Svenson, Dave Adams and R.L. Ticknor

Roots growing out of container drainholes, and weeds growing on the sandbed surface, are the two major problems associated with the use of sandbed subirrigation systems for nursery crop production. Adjusting the water level within the sandbed, application of herbicides to the sandbed surface, placing weed barriers on the sandbed surface, and placing copper hydroxide-treated weed barriers on the sandbed surface were tested to control rooting-out and weed growth. Coppertreated barriers provided the best control of rooting-out and weed growth without reducing the shoot growth of heather, forsythia, or weigela. Several herbicides provided good control of rooting-out and weed growth without reducing the shoot growth of daphne.

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Sven E. Svenson

The influence of no shading; 30%, 47%, or 63% black polypropylene stationary shading; and white poly retractable shading (50% shade operated to provide morning “cold trapping”) on substrate temperature was studied for Coreopsis verticillata `Zagreb' and Forsythia `Lynwood' growing in 2.75-L black polycontainers filled with an unamended Douglas-fir bark substrate. The southwest region of the rootball had the highest daily substrate temperatures under all the shading systems. Substrate temperatures were highest under no shading or 30% shading (often >45 °C) and lowest under retractable shading (never >38 °C). Root death occurred on the southwest portion of the rootball on plants growing under all shading systems except under retractable shading. Coreopsis and Forsythia were taller when grown under 63% stationary shading compared to other shading systems but had more shoot dry weight when grown under retractable shading. Cooler substrate temperatures that prevent damage to the root system may help explain increased growth of some nursery crops when produced under retractable shading.