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A. Naor, H. Hupert, Y. Greenblat, M. Peres, A. Kaufman and I. Klein

The interactions between irrigation and crop level with respect to fruit size distribution and midday stem water potential were investigated for 3 years in a nectarine (Prunus persica L. `Fairlane') orchard located in a semi-arid zone. Wide ranges of crop loads and irrigation rates in stage III were employed, extending from practically nonlimiting to severely limiting levels. Irrigation during stage III of fruit growth ranged from 0.63 to 1.29 of potential evapotranspiration (ETp). Fruit were hand thinned to a wide range of fruit levels (300 to 2000) fruit/tree in the 555-tree/ha orchard. The yields and stem water potentials from 1996, 1997 and 1998 were combined together and the interrelations among yield, crop load and stem water potential were examined. Fruit <55 mm in diameter growing at 400 fruit per tree were the only ones not affected by irrigation level. The yield of fruit of 60 to 75 mm in diameter increased with irrigation level, but only a slight increase was observed when the irrigation rate rose above 1.01 ETp. A significant decrease in the yields of 60 to 65, 65 to 70, and 70 to 75-mm size grades occurred at crop levels greater than 1000, 800, and 400 fruit per tree, respectively. Midday stem water potential decreased with increasing crop level, and it is suggested that midday stem water potential responds to crop load rather than crop level. Relative yields of the various size grades were highly correlated with midday stem water potential. It was suggested that the midday stem water potential integrates the combined effects of water stress and crop load on nectarine fruit size.

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A. Naor, I. Klein, H. Hupert, Y. Grinblat, M. Peres and A. Kaufman

The interactions between irrigation and crop level with respect to fruit size distribution and soil and stem water potentials were investigated in a nectarine (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch. `Fairlane') orchard located in a semiarid zone. Irrigation treatments during stage III of fruit growth ranged from 0.62 to 1.29 of potential evapotranspiration (ETp). Fruit were hand thinned to a wide range of fruit levels (200 to 1200 fruit/tree in the 555-tree/ha orchard). Total yield did not increase with increasing irrigation rate above 0.92 ETp in 1996 and maximum yield was found at 1.06 ETp in 1997. Fruit size distribution was shifted towards larger fruit with increasing irrigation level and with decreasing crop level. The two highest irrigation treatments had similar midday stem water potentials. Our findings indicate that highest yields and highest water use efficiency (yield/water consumption) are not always related to minimum water stress. Total yield and large fruit yield were highly and better correlated with midday stem water potential than with soil water potential. This confirms other reports that midday stem water potential is an accurate indicator of tree water stress and may have utility in irrigation scheduling.

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Ji Hae Jun, Jung Hyun Kwon, Eun Young Nam, Kyeong Ho Chung, Ik Koo Yun, Seok Kyu Yun, Yong Bum Kwack, Sung Jong Kim and Sang Jo Kang

‘Hahong’ is a new nectarine cultivar from the Rural Development Administration’s National Institute of Horticultural & Herbal Science breeding program, which has been in operation since 1962. ‘Hahong’ is a midseason nectarine that produces large

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Margaret Worthington and John R. Clark

‘Effie’ is the sixth nectarine released from the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture (UA) peach and nectarine [ Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] breeding program. Prior nectarine releases include ‘Arrington’, ‘Bradley’, ‘Westbrook

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Eun Young Nam, Jung Hyun Kwon, Ji Hae Jun, Kyeong Ho Chung, Seok Kyu Yun, Sung Jong Kim and Yun Su Do

‘Yellow Dream’ is the fifth nectarine [ Prunus persica (Batsch) L.] released from the National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science (NIHHS), Rural Development Administration (RDA). The NIHHS RDA has released 10 peach and 7 nectarine

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Natalia Falagán, Francisco Artés, Perla A. Gómez, Francisco Artés-Hernández, Alejandro Pérez-Pastor, Jose M. de la Rosa and Encarna Aguayo

Nectarines and peaches ( Prunus persica ) are the fourth most important fruit crops in the world, and the second most important in Europe, after apple ( Malus domestica Borkh.; Legua et al., 2012 ). Spain is the second leading European producer

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Molly Felts, Renee T. Threlfall and Margaret L. Worthington

Peaches ( Prunus persica L. Batsch) have been cultivated worldwide for thousands of years. Peaches and nectarines belong to the same species but are differentiated by a single genetic locus that controls pubescence. Peaches and nectarines are both

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Caroline Gibert, Joël Chadœuf, Gilles Vercambre, Michel Génard and Françoise Lescourret

)], bell pepper [ Capsicum annuum L. ( Aloni et al., 1998 )], sweet cherry [ Prunus avium L. ( Peschel and Knoche, 2005 ; Sekse, 1995 )], apple [ Malus domestica Borkh. ( Opara and Tadesse, 2000 ; Opara et al., 2000 )], and nectarine ( Nguyen-The et

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John R. Clark and Paul. J. Sandefur

‘Bowden’ and ‘Amoore Sweet’ are the fourth and fifth nectarines released from the University of Arkansas peach and nectarine [ Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] breeding program. Prior nectarine releases include ‘Arrington’, ‘Bradley’, and ‘Westbrook

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Andrés Olivos, Scott Johnson, Qin Xiaoqiong and Carlos H. Crisosto

mealiness or woolliness), FB, black pit cavity, flesh translucency (gel breakdown), red pigment accumulation (bleeding), lack of flavor, and failure to ripen ( Lurie and Crisosto, 2005 ). Nectarine FB is a genetic disorder that can be triggered by a