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Rachel E. Rudolph, Carl Sams, Robert Steiner, Stephen H. Thomas, Stephanie Walker and Mark E. Uchanski

reduced plant vigor, yield loss, or complete loss of production by seedling death, depending on the crop’s stage of development ( Goldberg, 2001 ). The use of mustards, both Brassica and Sinapsis species, as bioactive cover crops is becoming common

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Rick A. Boydston, Treva Anderson and Steven F. Vaughn

, many producers hand-weed containers to ensure maximum growth of ornamentals and to keep weeds from lowering the value of the crop. The use of products derived from natural sources to control pests is appealing, and developing new uses for mustard

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Eric B. Brennan and Richard F. Smith

tillage systems for organic vegetables found that hollow-stemmed mustard cover crops such as S. alba (‘IdaGold’) grown in furrows were relatively easy to kill mechanically when they were crushed by tractor wheels or mowed (Brennan, unpublished data, 2008

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Susan L.F. Meyer, Inga A. Zasada, Shannon M. Rupprecht, Mark J. VanGessel, Cerruti R.R. Hooks, Matthew J. Morra and Kathryne L. Everts

Deregistration of synthetic chemical pesticides has increased the need for alternative management strategies directed at soilborne diseases and pests. One alternative available to conventional and organic growers is incorporation of mustard seed

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Brad Geary, Corey Ransom, Brad Brown, Dennis Atkinson and Saad Hafez

general public through product volatilization and drift), and economic profitability ( Amvac Chemical Corp., 2004 ; Saeed et al., 2000 ). Mustard cultivar Idagold and oil seed radish cultivar Colonel have been suggested as biofumigant (plants that produce

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Gary S. Bañuelos and Bradley D. Hanson

more Se from the soil. Once absorbed by plant roots, Se translocated to the shoot and other plant parts may be harvested and removed from the site. Bañuelos (2002) reported that Brassica crops, e.g., canola ( B. napus ), Indian mustard ( B. juncea

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Husrev Mennan and Mathieu Ngouajio

rainfall and the bars represent temperature; (1.8 × °C) + 32 = °F, 1 mm = 0.0394 inch. Cover crop experiment. The cover crop treatments consisted of rape, field mustard, oriental mustard, and bare ground with no cover crop. The brassica cover crops were

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Chase Jones-Baumgardt, David Llewellyn, Qinglu Ying and Youbin Zheng

flux density (TPFD, 400 to 800 nm) levels ranging from 110 to 545 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 (16-h photoperiod) on growth and phytochemical content of four Brassicaceae genotypes: red pak choi, kohlrabi, tatsoi, and mustard. Their trial used modules comprising

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Timothy Coolong, Derek M. Law, John C. Snyder, Brent Rowell and Mark A. Williams

-eight varieties of leafy greens were evaluated ( Tables 1–6 ). Nine mustard, eight kale, five collards, five turnip, five swiss chard, and six arugula varieties were evaluated for their performance in an organic production system. The majority of varieties

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Xi Wang, Genhua Niu, Mengmeng Gu, Paul A. Baumann and Joseph Masabni

et al., 2011 ). Canola ( Brassica napus ) and mustard ( S. alba ) seed meals were used as organic sources of fertilizer to increase essential nutrients in the strawberry ( Fragaria ×ananassa ) production, and greatly reduced summer annual weeds like