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Bao-Zhong Yuan, Zhi-Long Bie, and Jie Sun

Muskmelon ( Cucumis melo L.) is a cultivar of Cucumis melo and a warm-season cucurbit species that belongs to family cucurbitaceae ( Farcuh et al., 2020 ; Jeffrey, 1980 ; Kirkbride, 1993 ). They are often readily available from the late

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Chen Jiang, Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Guoying Ma, and Christopher Gunter

Annual consumption of muskmelon ( Cucumis melo reticulatus ) is 4.1 kg/capita in the United States ( USDA-ERS, 2012 ). Muskmelon is a good dietary source of provitamin A, vitamin C, and folate ( Hodges and Lester, 2011 ), but its consumption in the

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Xiaofeng Yang, Gang Li, Weihong Luo, Lili Chen, Shaopeng Li, Ming Cao, and Xuebin Zhang

Muskmelon ( Cucumis melo L.) is one of the most important high-value crops in protective cultivation. In China, the planting area of muskmelon was 42 × 10 4 ha with the fruit yield exceeded 1400 × 10 7 kg in 2013. Nitrogen plays an important role

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Xiaofeng Yang, Lianzhu Chen, Ming Cao, Xuebin Zhang, and Shaopeng Li

absorption and assimilation of nitrogen in vegetables and improve the agricultural utilization efficiency of nitrogen ( Ardjasa et al., 2002 ; Mohammad and Naseem, 2006 ; Zhu and Chen, 2002 ). Muskmelon is one of the most important economic crops in

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Robert L. Long, Kerry B. Walsh, David J. Midmore, and Gordon Rogers

A common practice for the irrigation management of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. reticulatus group) is to restrict water supply to the plants from late fruit development and through the harvest period. However, this late fruit development period is critical for sugar accumulation and water stress at this stage is likely to limit the final fruit soluble solids concentration (SSC). Two field irrigation experiments were conducted to test the idea that maintaining muskmelon plants free of water stress through to the end of harvest will maximise sugar accumulation in the fruit. In both trials, water stress before or during harvest detrimentally affected fruit SSC and fresh weight (e.g., no stress fruit 11.2% SSC, weight 1180 g; stress fruit 8.8% SSC, weight 990 g). Maintaining plants free of water stress from flowering through to the end of harvest is recommended to maximise yield and fruit quality.

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Dominique Lacan and J.C. Baccou

Respiration, C2H4 production, lipid composition, and electrolyte leakage were monitored during ripening of two nonnetted muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) varieties differing in their storage life: `Clipper' (a long-storage-life variety) and `Jerac', which was used as a control. Respiration rates were comparable in both varieties. Although `Jerac' exhibited normal climacteric C2H4 production, `Clipper' continued to produce significant amounts of C2H4 until senescence. Electrolyte leakage increased with ripening and was always higher in `Jerac'. The loss of membrane integrity seems to be related to changes in the lipid composition due to a breakdown of phospholipids, an increase of sterol synthesis, and an increase in fatty acid saturation. On the contrary, in `Clipper', the absence of a major change in sterol and phospholipids content and the high level of fatty acid unsaturation suggest that membrane permeability is not greatly affected during ripening. This is consistent with the low loss of solutes measured and may delay senescence in `Clipper' fruit.

Open access

Sarah E. Lingle, Gene E. Lester, and James R. Dunlap

Abstract

Postharvest sugar content and activities of four enzymes of sucrose metabolism were followed in the edible mesocarp tissue of the netted muskmelon (Cucumis melo L., var. reticulatus, cv Magnum 45). Melons harvested at full-slip were shrink film-wrapped to inhibit water loss and/or heated to 45°C for 3 hr before storage at 4°C for up to 18 days. Sucrose content of edible mesocarp remained constant between harvest and 12 days of storage. The sucrose content of nonheated fruit declined between 12 and 18 days of storage, but there was no coincident increase in glucose or fructose. There was little acid invertase activity. Neutral invertase activity did not vary significantly with storage, but was slightly higher in heated, wrapped fruit than in nonheated, wrapped fruit. Sucrose synthase activity increased with storage, and was higher in heated than nonheated fruit. There was no discernible pattern of sucrose-phosphate synthase activity. No enzyme activity was correlated with the content of any sugar.

Open access

J. D. Norton, R. D. Cosper, D. A. Smith, and K. S. Rymal

Abstract

‘AUrora’ is a multiple disease resistant muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) cultivar developed by the Dept. of Horticulture, Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn Univ., adapted to growing conditions in the Southeastern United States. ‘AUrora’ has resistance to downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis), powdery mildew, (Spherotheca fuliginea), and gummy stem blight (Didymella bryoniae). ‘AUrora’ is especially suited for home, local and commercial markets where “jumbo” size fruit is preferred.

Open access

Timothy J Ng

Abstract

‘MaryGold’ is a white-fleshed casaba muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. Inodorus group) adapted to the climatic and cultural conditions prevalent in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. It is andromonoecious and produces oval, bright yellow, medium-sized fruits with a slightly wrinkled rind free of net. It is resistant to race 2 of fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f. melonis (Leach and Currence) Snyder and Hansen] and race 1 and race 2 of powdery mildew [Sphaerotheca fuliginea (Schlect ex Fr.) Poll], It stores well and is suitable for shipping as well as for local markets.

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Gary R. Cline, John D. Sedlacek, Steve L. Hillman, Sharon K. Parker, and Anthony F. Silvernail

Striped and spotted cucumber beetles are important insect pests of cucurbits and vectors of the causal agent of bacterial wilt ( Erwinia tracheiphila ), the most serious disease threat of muskmelon in Kentucky ( Hoffman, 1998 ; Rowell et al., 2002