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Patrick J. Conner

The genus Vitis L. contains two subgenera, Euvitis Planch. (bunch grapes) and Muscadinia Planch. (muscadine grapes). The muscadine grape is the only commonly cultivated member of the Muscadinia subgenus. Muscadines are native to the southern

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Stephen J. Stringer, Donna A. Marshall, Blair J. Sampson, and James M. Spiers

The muscadine grape is indigenous to the southeastern United States and has the distinction of being the first cultivated grape in North America. Native Americans prized the muscadine grape for its distinctive, savory, and delectable flavor and

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Molly Felts, Renee T. Threlfall, John R. Clark, and Margaret L. Worthington

Because of the high humidity and incidence of disease, grapes grown for commercial production in the southern United States need to be disease tolerant. The muscadine grape ( V. rotundifolia Michx.) is native to the southern United States

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Carlos E. Carpio, Charles D. Safley, and E. Barclay Poling

Muscadine grapes are native to the southeastern United States. Currently, these grapes are produced in 12 southeastern states and account for ≈5000 acres ( Cline and Fisk, 2006 ). The acres devoted to muscadine varieties have showed substantial

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Stephen J. Stringer, Donna A. Marshall, and Dennis J. Gray

‘Eudora’, a purple-fruited muscadine grape ( Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) intended for the fresh market, has been approved for joint release as a public domain cultivar by the University of Florida Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS ( Fig. 1

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Patrick J. Conner

‘RubyCrisp’ is a muscadine grape ( Vitis rotundifolia ) that was released by the University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences (Athens, GA). ‘RubyCrisp’ produces high yields of large-sized berries with excellent taste

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Sebastain N. Awondo, Esendugue Greg Fonsah, and Dennis J. Gray

Muscadine grape is a species native to the southeastern United States and is well adapted to the warm and humid conditions in this region. Unlike widely consumed “bunch” grapes (primarily Vitis vinifera ), muscadine grapes form smaller clusters

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Xia Xu, Jiang Lu, and O. Lamikanra

Low frequency of in vitro regeneration has hampered the adoption of genetic engineering technique for improving the quality of muscadine grape. This study is to develop a straightforward method for high-frequency regeneration of muscadine grapes in vitro. Leaves, petioles, and immature ovules of muscadine grapes were cultured on various media. Embryogenic callus, somatic embryos were formed after 9 weeks inoculated on embryo rescue (ER) medium. The somatic embryos were isolated and subcultured on fresh medium to promote enlargement and increase the number of uniformly sized somatic embryos. Of the medium tested (MS, NN, and ER), the ER medium was the best for somatic embryo growth and multiplication. The somatic embryogenic lines were maintained by transferring the embryos to the fresh ER medium every 4 weeks. Germination was achieved by transferring these embryos to woody plant medium or NN medium. The frequency of somatic embryogenesis of embryo germination appeared to be genotype dependent. The establishment of the somatic embryogenesis system in this study should be a step forward in directly transferring a foreign gene into muscadine grape.

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Jorge A. Cardona, Allen F. Wysocki, and Stephen T. Talcott

natural antioxidants and the occurrence of these compounds in by-products has driven fruit and vegetable processors to attempt to extract polyphenolics from their wastes and increase the profitability of their operations. Muscadine grape is an important

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James M. Spiers and John H. Braswell

Leaf concentrations of N, P, K, Fe, and Mn in `Sterling' muscadine grapes (Vitis rotundifolia Michaux) grown for 2 years in sand culture were not influenced by different N fertilizer sources. Leaf Zn and Cu were higher in plants receiving N as NH4NO3 rather than as (NH4)2SO4. Growth was greatest in plants fertilized with NH4NO3 compared to those with either (NH4)2SO4 or NaNO3 fertilization. Leaf Ca, Mg, Mn, and Cu content decreased linearly and leaf N increased linearly as N fertilizer rates were raised from 1.8 to 16.1 mM. Plant growth was a positively correlated with leaf N but was negatively correlated with leaf Ca, Mg, and Mn content. Percent Mg in the leaves was reduced when N levels, regardless of N source, were raised from the low (1.8 mM) to middle (5.4 mM) rate. High leaf N levels were correlated with lower Ca and Mg in the leaves, indicating a possible relationship between N fertilization and the late-season Mg deficiency often observed in muscadine grapes.