Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 844 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Full access

David W. Burger

Comparisons were made between a commercially available, solar-activated mist control device (Weather Watcher®) and time clocks to determine their relative effectiveness, usefulness, and water-use characteristics on a greenhouse mist propagation bench. Coleus cuttings produced more roots per cutting and had greater average root lengths under Weather Watcher-controlled mist than those cuttings on a mist bench controlled by time. Paulownia cuttings produced the same number of roots under solar- or time-activated mist; however, the average root length was greater under Weather Watcher control. Mist benches controlled by the Weather Watcher used only one-third the water used by benches controlled by a time clock.

Free access

Darren J. Hayes and Bryan J. Peterson

that were treated with solutions varying in concentration of K-IBA and inserted into propagation media varying in their proportions of coarse perlite and milled peatmoss. The effects of these treatments were evaluated in both overhead mist and

Free access

Lucas McCartney and Mark Lefsrud

. Critical temperatures that result in freeze damage to crops. Examples of crops are given. Data from Bootsma and Brown (1985) . The application of a thin layer of ice on the fruit by a continuous misting of a fine water film prevents the crop from reaching

Open access

Olivia Sanchez, Stephanie E. Burnett, and Bryan J. Peterson

humidity and poor air circulation in enclosed cases often resulted in cutting decay and disease symptoms, likely caused by gray mold [ Botrytis cinerea ( Preece, 2003 )]. The first published research using overhead mist systems for propagation dates back

Open access

Edward J. Ryder and Albert S. Johnson

Abstract

Intermittent mist spraying of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) flowers during the period of anther dehiscence permits continuous removal of pollen with little effort Pollination following pollen removal by this method produced 94% hybrids compared to 50% or less usually obtained by the conventional washing method.

Open access

G. J. Wilfret, T. C. Weiler, B. K. Harbaugh, and P. A. Hammer

Abstract

‘Floriana Mist’ and ‘Floriana Cascade’ gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata L.) are selections of Gypsophila ‘Bristol Fairy’ (Caryophyllaceae), the double-flowered Baby's Breath used in floral arrangements. These clones were selected because of consistent flowering when rooted cuttings were planted from September through February in central Florida. Inconsistent flowering of commercial cuttings of ‘Bristol Fairy’ when planted during short days (<12 hr light) and cool nights (10° to 15°C) led to the selection of clones which would flower consistently, independent of planting date. ‘Floriana Mist’ and ‘Floriana Cascade’ have performed well in commercial field trials in Florida and California from 1977 to 1981. They were released cooperatively by the Univ. of Florida and Purdue Univ. in 1983.

Open access

Elden J. Stang, David C. Ferree, Franklin R. Hall, and Robert A. Spotts

Abstract

Spring overtree misting using greenhouse mist nozzles was tested for effects on bloom delay, incidence of disease, European red mite populations, fruit size, maturity, fruit russeting and tree survival of ‘Golden Delicious’ apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) on Mailing 9 rootstock. Bloom delay of 9 and 8 days was observed in misted trees in 1975 and 1976, respectively, Apple scab was controlled with standard fungicide spray programs, but fireblight was severe in 1975 on misted trees. European red mite (Panonychus ulmi Koch.) egg hatch was delayed on misted trees but post treatment populations were not affected. Phytotoxicity occurred on calyx and foliar tissue in misted trees in 1975. Fruit set and yield were reduced in misted trees in both years. Fruit size in misted treatments in 1975 was reduced through late July, but was comparable at harvest. In 1976, misted fruit size was reduced. Fruit color, soluble solids and firmness tests indicated maturity was delayed by mist. Fruit russeting in spring misted treatments was reduced. Substantial tree losses occurred in misted treatments in 1975.

Open access

J. L. Paul and A. T. Leiser

Abstract

An aspect of mist propagation which may be important in rooting cuttings is the quality of water used in misting. This may be particularly important in arid regions where many waters contain significant concentrations of salts. Although waters have been classified (1) for general irrigation purposes on the basis of total salts, sodium rating, boron concentration, etc., the propagator sometimes overlooks these properties of his mist water.

Open access

G. D. Coorts and C. C. Sorenson

Abstract

Intermittent mist is widely used by plant propagators in the rooting of cuttings. However, it has been demonstrated that under this method of propagation nutrients are leached from cuttings. Recent work (1, 2, 3) has shown that by adding fertilizer to mist during the propagation of cuttings, the nutrient content of the cuttings may be replenished. Due to the length of time in the propagation bench, sanitation is much more critical when propagating woody ornamental plants under a nutrient mist than when propagating herbaceous plants.

Open access

G. J. Keever and H. B. Tukey Jr.

Abstract

Rhododendron cuttings absorbed Ν and P from intermittent nutrient mist during propagation; there was no net uptake of K, Mg, or Ca. However, the foliage was injured and rooting was inhibited at all concentrations of nutrient mist. Cultivars differed in sensitivity to nutrient mist. ‘Gloria’ cuttings did not root under distilled water mist and developed symptoms resembling Κ deficiency. Azaleas have low nutritional requirements and nutrient mist during propagation was of no benefit.