Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • "material handling" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Full access

Ward Simonton

The commercial greenhouse operation, with a controlled and structured environment and a large number of highly repetitive tasks, offers many advantages for automation relative to other segments of agriculture. Benefits and incentives to automate are significant and include improving the safety of the work force and the environment, along with ensuring sufficient productivity to compete in today's global market. The use of equipment and computers to assist production also may be particularly important in areas where labor costs and/or availability are a concern. However, automation for greenhouse systems faces very significant challenges in overcoming nonuniformity, cultural practice, and economic problems. As a case study, a robotic workcell for processing geranium cuttings for propagation has been developed. The robot grasps randomly positioned cuttings from a conveyor, performs leaf removal, trims the stems, and inserts the cuttings into plug trays. While the system has been shown to process effectively many plants automatically, the robot is not equipped to handle successfully the wide variety of cuttings that a trained worker handles with aplomb. A key challenge in greenhouse automation will be to develop productive systems that can perform in a reliable and cost-effective way with highly variable biological products.

Free access

Erik M. Hardy and Dana M. Blumenthal

Power), another standard, widely available component of materials handling systems, and pressure-treated 2 × 6 (5 cm by 15 cm) lumber. Each tray consisted of a wire deck (94 cm by 124 cm) with two pressure-treated wooden members installed perpendicular

Free access

Fumiomi Takeda, Bernadine C. Strik, Derek Peacock, and John R. Clark

provided assistance in material handling. James Carew and Thomas Tworkoski provided a critical review of an earlier draft of this manuscript. Ann K. Hummell prepared the graphics.

Free access

Fumiomi Takeda, Bernadine C. Strik, Derek Peacock, and John R. Clark

graphic work. Kenda Woodburn and Dan Chapman in Arkansas and Gloria Murray in Oregon provided assistance in material handling. Thanks to Thomas Tworkoski and James Carew for critical review of this manuscript.

Free access

Jeffrey Adelberg, Robert Pollock, Nihal Rajapakse, and Roy Young

Two varieties of Cattleya orchids (C. Loddigessi `Elen' × C. Loddigessi Alba `Extra' and Brassolaeliocattleya. Mem. `Helen Brown' Sweet Afton) were micropropagated in sealed, three-dimensional polypropylene vessels with microporous, semi-permeable membrane films to allow diffusion of water, dissolved nutrients, and gas to plant material inside the vessels. During tissue culture on sugar-containing media, chance contaminants were eliminated on the vessels outer surface using 5% bleach solution. Proper decontamination treatment did not effect carbohydrate content or subsequent growth of tissues contained within the vessels. Plantlets remaining in membrane vessels were shipped (7 days at 14–30°C) from Japan to the United States in the dark in a plastic tray and arrived without changes in fresh or dry weight of whole plantlets. However, shoot dry weight did increase significantly. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose reserves established on sugar-containing media were greater in root than shoot tissue and were largely expended during shipping concurrent with increased shoot dry weight. It is likely carbohydrate catabolism provided energy for these CAM plantlets to continue carbon fixation, resulting in positive net carbon assimilation in the dark shipping environment. Changes in starch concentrations during shipping were not significant. Plantlets grew photoautotrophically in hydroponic culture in the greenhouse, following transport in the same sealed membrane vessels. Carbohydrate concentration of plantlets following hydroponic culture was not significantly different than after the shipping process. Sealed-membrane vessels for micropropagation, decontamination, shipping and greenhouse growth were useful for culture of Cattleya to facilitate scale-up of materials handling and international commerce of tissue-cultured plants.

Free access

Ayse Tascan, Jeff Adelberg, Mevlut Tascan, Agnes Rimando, Nirmal Joshee, and Anand K. Yadav

volume between the FS30 and FS20 showed some of the flexibility and plant responses this system allowed. Because the fiber can be cut to any size, scale-up in two dimensions looks like a question of the ease of materials handling. Compared with a

Free access

Cheryl R. Boyer, Thomas V. Gallagher, Charles H. Gilliam, Glenn B. Fain, H. Allen Torbert, and Jeff L. Sibley

-bottom trucks), and material handling (screening, composting, or aging). Note that these prices are per green ton rather than cubic yards as the PB price was reported earlier in this study. Further investigation in the economics of CCR, whole pine trees, PTS

Full access

Scott B. Lukas, Joseph DeFrank, Orville C. Baldos, and Glenn S. Sakamoto

, compared with the mean ambient temperature of the second trial of 24.0 °C. Natural mean rainfall throughout the duration of the first experiment was 25.4 mm compared with 26.3 mm in the second experiment. Vegetative material handling. The seashore dropseed

Full access

Jonathan M. Frantz, Bryon Hand, Lee Buckingham, and Somik Ghose

zone control, thermal and shade curtains, efficient hydronic warm-floor and overhead heating system, and efficient irrigation and material handling systems. Energy modeling with Virtual Grower was performed to estimate the benefits of the renewable fuel