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Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Andrew M. Jones, Bharathi Avula, Victor Maddox, and Dennis E. Rowe

collected. The collected plant tissue and soil samples were placed in brown paper bags, whereas samples for the herbarium were placed immediately in a botanical press for drying and preserving. The plant material designated for lignans and nutrient analyses

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Kent E. Cushman, Rita M. Moraes, Patrick D. Gerard, Ebru Bedir, Bladimiro Silva, and Ikhlas A. Khan

Leaves of American mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) are being investigated as an alternative and renewable source of podophyllotoxin, a pharmaceutical compound used in the manufacture of several drugs. This study examined long-term performance of mayapple populations subjected to different harvest strategies. A naturally occurring population in shade was subjected to leaf removal treatments of frequency (every year, every 2nd or 3rd year) or timing (early or late season). Plots were 1.0 m2, established during Spring 2001, and treatments were applied from 2001 to 2004. Control plots not previously harvested were also included each year. Plants did not tolerate the severest of leaf removal treatments: early harvest time in combination with annual harvest frequency. Early annual harvests reduced total leaf dry mass and total leaf area in a quadratic manner. Late harvest conducted annually, and early harvest conducted every other year, also reduced leaf dry mass and area but not as much as early annual harvest. Plants harvested every year, early, or early every year produced fewer sexual shoots than other treatment combinations. Contents of α-peltatin, β-peltatin, and total lignans were higher for leaves harvested early than those harvested late during each year of the study, demonstrating that lignan contents were affected by leaf age and not treatment. In conclusion, our results for plants grown in shade show that leaves can be removed late in the growing season every 2nd or 3rd year or early every 3rd year without reducing long-term performance of the population. This is more restrictive than that reported for populations in full sun where plants tolerated late harvests every year.

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Kent E. Cushman, Muhammad Maqbool, Hemant Lata, Ebru Bedir, Ikhlas A. Khan, and Rita M. Moraes

Four levels of shade (0%, 30%, 55%, and 80%) were used to determine their effect on growth and lignan content of american mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum L.). Mayapple rhizomes were harvested from the wild and transplanted into plant beds on 20 Dec. 2001 using a randomized complete block design with four blocks. Growth and lignan content were recorded during spring of 2002 and 2003. Leaf samples were analyzed for the following lignans: podophyllotoxin, alpha-peltatin, and beta-peltatin. Increasing levels of shade increased shoot longevity, leaf area per plant (cm2/plant), and shoot height. Shade did not affect shoot emergence, total leaf area (cm2·m-2), or leaf dry mass (g·m-2 or g/plant). Regardless of year, podophyllotoxin and total lignan contents at 0% shade were significantly greater than those at 80% shade, and the overall trend was for decreasing contents with increasing shade. Shade did not affect alpha-peltatin content. Content of beta-peltatin was greatest at 0% shade compared to the other three shade treatments. Year affected alpha-peltatin and beta-peltatin contents, with less content of each in 2003 than in 2002. There were large numerical decreases in podophyllotoxin yield (podophyllotoxin content per unit area, mg·m-2) as shade increased from 0% to 80%, but these differences were only marginally significant (P = 0.0897). In contrast, podophyllotoxin yield was significantly greater in 2003 than in 2002 as total leaf area and dry mass significantly increased. Increasing levels of shade slightly decreased air and soil temperatures. Our results indicate that american mayapple is not a shade-requiring species. Under full sun (0% shade) shoots did not persist as long as under shade and leaves were smaller and thicker, but total lignan content was significantly greater than under shade. It appears that growers of specialty crops serving the pharmaceutical industry can establish and cultivate american mayapple under full sun, thus providing leaf biomass with high podophyllotoxin content while avoiding the cost of expensive shade structures.

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Riccardo Gucci, Giovanni Caruso, Angelo Canale, Augusto Loni, Alfio Raspi, Stefania Urbani, Agnese Taticchi, Sonia Esposto, and Maurizio Servili

taken into account for oil classification, yet the modern concept of oil quality is mainly based on phenolic composition (secoiridoids and lignans in particular), which is closely related to the sensory and health properties of VOO ( Servili et al., 2004

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Kent Cushman, Muhammad Maqbool, Ebru Bedir, Hemant Lata, Ikhlas Khan, and Rita Moraes

Podophyllotoxin is a pharmaceutical compound extracted from rhizomes of Indian mayapple (Podophyllumemodi). Leaves of American mayapple (P. peltatum) also contain podophyllotoxin, and the species is being investigated as a domestic, renewable, and alternative source of the compound. The objective of this study was to explore strategies of leaf removal that would not adversely affect regrowth of American mayapple shoots in subsequent years. Plots were established in two locations among naturally occurring populations in the wild, one in full sun and one in partial shade. Plots were 1.0 m2 and leaves were removed from plants every spring, every other spring, or every third spring. In addition, leaves were removed in early spring, soon after shoots emerged and leaves had fully expanded, or in late spring, when leaves first showed evidence of yellowing and beginning to senesce. Sexual and asexual leaves were harvested separately. Leaf number, leaf area, and dry weight were recorded. Subsamples of leaf material were extracted to determine podophyllotoxin, α-peltatin, and β-peltatin contents. Results clearly showed that leaf removal every year, in combination with early harvest, was too severe and plants lost vigor over the 4-year period of this study. Plants subjected to this treatment combination produced significantly less leaf area and dry weight than any of the other treatment combinations. Results were similar for both sun and shade locations. Lignan content was not affected by treatment. Our results indicate that leaves can be removed from mayapple plants as often as every year provided harvests are not scheduled too soon after shoot emergence.

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Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Charles L. Cantrell, Mateus Augusto Donega, Tess Astatkie, and Bonnie Heidel

Biochimie 80 207 222 Koulman, A. Quax, W.J. Pras, N. 2004 Biotechnology of medicinal plants: Vitalizer and therapeutic: Podophyllotoxin and related lignans produced by plants. In: Ramawat, K.G. (ed.). Science Publishers, Enfield, NH Leander, K. Rosen, B

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Mingyuan Xu, Yingwei Wang, Qianbo Wang, Shenglei Guo, Yang Liu, Jia Liu, Zhonghua Tang, and Zhenyue Wang

; thus, it has been widely used to treat chronic bronchitis, neurasthenia, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease ( Sun et al., 2016 ). The components of phenolic, triterpenoid saponins, lignan, coumarins, flavones, polysaccharides, and volatility have

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Penelope Perkins-Veazie and Gene Lester

phenylpropanoid synthesis ( Taiz and Zeiger, 1998 ). Phenylpropanoids include anthocyanins, tannins, lignans, stilbenes, and a host of other phenolic compounds, many of which have reported health attributes ( Taiz and Zeiger, 1998 ). The most common problem

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Manuela Baietto and A. Dan Wilson

. occidentialis to the occurrence of high concentrations of lignans such as plicatic acid derivatives ( Maclean and Macdonald, 1967 ) present in the wood of Thuja plicata D. Don (western red-cedar), a closely related species known to have high resistance to

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Attila Hegedűs, Emőke Balogh, Rita Engel, Béla Zoltan Sipos, János Papp, Anna Blázovics, and Éva Stefanovits-Bányai

, S.M. Sjöholm, R.E. 2005 Chemical studies on antioxidant mechanisms and free radical scavenging properties of lignans Org. Biomol. Chem. 3 3336 3347 Faostat 2006 Crops data 20 Jan. 2008 < http