Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 70 items for :

  • "light quantity" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Full access

David Llewellyn, Youbin Zheng, and Mike Dixon

within a given greenhouse facility. Spectral assessments were made six times at the two-tiered and five times each at the one- and three-tiered greenhouses between 4 Apr. and 24 May 2012. Results and discussion Light quantity. Figure 1 shows typical

Free access

Beth A. Fausey, Royal D. Heins, and Arthur C. Cameron

The growth and development of Achillea ×millefolium L. `Red Velvet', Gaura lindheimeri Engelm. & Gray `Siskiyou Pink' and Lavandula angustifolia Mill. `Hidcote Blue' were evaluated under average daily light integrals (DLIs) of 5 to 20 mol·m-2·d-1. Plants were grown in a 22 ± 2 °C glass greenhouse with a 16-h photoperiod under four light environments: 50% shading of ambient light plus PPF of 100 μmol·m-2·s-1 (L1); ambient light plus PPF of 20 μmol·m-2·s-1 (L2); ambient light plus PPF of 100 μmol·m-2·s-1 (L3); and ambient light plus PPF of 150 μmol·m-2·s-1 (L4). Between 5 to 20 mol·m-2·d-1, DLI did not limit flowering and had little effect on timing in these studies. Hence, the minimum DLI required for flowering of Achillea, Gaura and Lavandula must be <5 mol·m-2·d-1, the lowest light level tested. However, all species exhibited prostrate growth with weakened stems when grown at a DLI of about 10 mol·m-2·d-1. Visual quality and shoot dry mass of Achillea, Gaura and Lavandula linearly increased as DLI increased from 5 to 20 mol·m-2·d-1 and there was no evidence that these responses to light were beginning to decline. While 10 mol·m-2·d-1 has been suggested as an adequate DLI, these results suggest that 15 to 20 mol·m-2·d-1 should be considered a minimum for production of these herbaceous perennials when grown at about 22 °C.

Full access

Pamela C. Korczynski, Joanne Logan, and James E. Faust

The daily light integral (DLI) is a measurement of the total amount of photosynthetically active radiation delivered over a 24-hour period and is an important factor influencing plant growth over weeks and months. Contour maps were developed to demonstrate the mean DLI for each month of the year across the contiguous United States. The maps are based on 30 years of solar radiation data for 216 sites compiled and reported by the National Renewable Energy Lab in radiometric units (watt-hours per m-2·d-1, from 300 to 3,000 nm) that we converted to quantum units (mol·m-2·d-1, 400 to 700 nm). The mean DLI ranges from 5 to 10 mol·m-2·d-1 across the northern U.S. in December to 55 to 60 mol·m-2·d-1 in the southwestern U.S. in May through July. From October through February, the differences in DLI primarily occur between the northern and southern U.S., while from May through August the differences in DLI primarily occur between the eastern and western U.S. The DLI changes rapidly during the months before and after the vernal and autumnal equinoxes, e.g., increasing by more than 60% from February to April in many locations. The contour maps provide a means of estimating the typical DLI received across the U.S. throughout the year.

Free access

Veronica A. Hutchinson, Christopher J. Currey, and Roberto G. Lopez

Vegetatively propagated bedding plants are produced during the late winter and early spring when outdoor photosynthetic daily light integral (DLI) is low, especially in northern latitudes. Our objective was to quantify how propagation DLI influences subsequent growth and development of annual bedding plants. Cuttings of Angelonia angustifolia Benth. ‘AngelMist White Cloud’, Nemesia fruticans (Thunb.) Benth. ‘Aromatica Royal’, Osteospermum ecklonis (DC.) Norl. ‘Voltage Yellow’, and Verbena ×hybrida Ruiz ‘Aztec Violet’ were harvested and propagated in a glass-glazed greenhouse. After callusing (≈5 mol·m−2·d−1 for 7 days), cuttings of each species were placed under one of three different fixed-woven shadecloths providing ≈38%, 61%, or 86% shade or no shade with 16 h of supplemental light for 14 days. Rooted cuttings were then transplanted into 11-cm containers and grown in a common greenhouse of 21 ± 1 °C and DLI of ≈12 mol·m−2·d−1 to identify any residual effects on subsequent growth and development during the finish stage. As DLI during propagation increased, time to first open flower decreased for Angelonia, Nemesia, Osteospermum, and Verbena. For example, time to flower for Angelonia and Osteospermum was hastened by 23 and 19 days, respectively, as DLI during propagation increased from 1.2 to 12.3 mol·m−2·d−1. Our research can be used to predict growth and flowering under varying propagation DLIs for the cultivars of Angelonia, Nemesia, Osteospermum, and Verbena in the study.

Full access

Desmond R. Layne, Zhengwang Jiang, and James W. Rushing

Replicated trials were conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999 at commercial orchards in South Carolina to determine the influence of ground application of a metalized, high density polyethylene reflective film on fruit red skin color and maturity of peach (Prunus persica) cultivars that historically have poor red coloration. At each site there were two experimental treatments: 1) control and 2) reflective film (film). Film was applied 2 to 4 weeks before anticipated first harvest date by laying a 150-cm (5-ft) wide strip of plastic on either side of the tree row in the middles. Treatment areas at a given farm ranged from 0.25 to 0.5 ha (0.5 to 1.0 acre) in size and each treatment was replicated four times at each site. At harvest, two 50-fruit samples were picked from each plot per treatment. All fruit were sized and visually sorted for color (1 = 0% to 25%, 2 = 26% to 50%, 3 = 51% to 75%, and 4 = 76% to 100% red surface, respectively). A 10-fruit subsample was selected following color sorting and evaluated for firmness and soluble solids concentration (SSC). All cultivars tested (`CVN1', `Loring', `Bounty', `Summer Gold', `Sunprince', `Cresthaven' and `Encore') experienced significant increases in percent red surface when film was used in 1998 and 1999. This color improvement ranged from 16% to 44% (mean = 28%). On average, fruit from film were 4.2 N (0.9 lb force) softer and had 0.3% higher SSC than control fruit. Growers harvested more fruit earlier and in fewer harvests for film. Fruit size was not affected by film. Reflected solar radiation from film was not different in quality than incident sunlight. Film resulted in an increase in canopy air temperature and a reduction in canopy relative humidity during daylight hours.

Full access

Desmond R. Layne, Zhengwang Jiang, and James W. Rushing

Replicated trials were conducted in Summers 1998 and 1999 at two commercial orchards (A and B) to determine the influence of a metalized, high density polyethylene reflective film (SonocoRF) and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (ReTain), on fruit red skin coloration and maturity of `Gala' apples (Malus sylvestris var. domestica). There were four experimental treatments: 1) nontreated control; 2) reflective film (RF); 3) ReTain; and 4) RF + ReTain. RF was applied 4 weeks before anticipated start of harvest by laying a 5-ft-wide (150-cm) strip on each side of the tree row in the row middle. ReTain was applied 4 weeks before harvest at the commercial rate in one orchard and at 60% of the commercial rate in a second test. ReTain delayed fruit maturity. Fruit from RF trees had a significantly greater percent surface red color than fruit from trees not treated with RF. Fruit from RF + ReTain were significantly redder and had higher soluble solids concentration (SSC) than fruit from trees treated with ReTain alone. There were no differences in size, fruit firmness or starch content between fruit from RF and RF + Retain. RF appears to be a method to increase red skin coloration in `Gala' apples treated with ReTain without adversely impacting maturity.

Free access

Kevin M. Folta and Kayla Shea Childers

dependent on environmental conditions and here duration of light treatment probably had the most profound role. Other light parameters like light quantity and quality also were relatively static. Today, cultivars are selected based on photoperiod sensitivity

Free access

Kevin R. Cope and Bruce Bugbee

development. It is clear that light quantity and quality interact to determine plant morphology. The optimal light spectrum for plant growth and development likely changes with plant age as plant communities balance rapid leaf expansion necessary to maximize

Free access

Kevin M. Folta and Sofia D. Carvalho

Plant productivity and product quality ultimately are dependent on an interaction between genetics and environment, and one of the most important environmental cues is light. Light quantity, quality, and duration provide critical information to plants that mediate growth and development. Light signal transduction is dependent on a series of photoreceptors and their associated signaling pathways that direct intracellular processes that lead to changes in gene expression that ultimately affect plant form, function, and content. For the last several decades, scientists have dissected these signaling pathways and understand how they connect the environment to a response. The advent of narrow-bandwidth illumination in commercial lighting invites the opportunity to manipulate plant behavior and productivity through precise alteration of the ambient spectrum. This review describes the biochemical links that convert incident light into predictable changes in plant growth and development. These sensors and pathways serve as biochemical switches that can be selectively toggled to control plant growth, development, physiology, or metabolite accumulation.

Free access

John T. Erwin

Seedling stem elongation increased as the difference (DIF) between day (DT) and night (NT) temperatures increased from 10 to 26C (DIF=DT-NT). Stem elongation was primarily dependent on DIF on all crops studied except spring bulb crops. Internode lengths decreased in tomato (68%), watermelon (80%), squash (32%), sweet corn (68%) and snap bean (26%) as the difference between day and night temperatures decreased 12 degrees (C). Cucumber internode length decreased by 84% as DIF decreased 16 degrees (C). The ratio of male to female cucumber flowers decreased from 14 to 1, as DIF decreased 12 degrees (C) from 23 DT/17 NT to 17 DT/26 NT. Stem elongation was very sensitive to cool temperatures during the first 3 hours of the morning. Stem elongation was almost the same if the seedlings were cooled for the first 3 hours of the day versus cooling the plants all day. The interactions between temperature on stem elongation and light quantity and quality, and photoperiod will be discussed. Application of DIF in both northern and southern greenhouses will also be discussed.