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William Garrett Owen

, propagation ( Owen, 2017 ) and plant growth control ( Latimer, 2016 ) studies, respectively. To date, optimum fertilization requirements ( Owen et al., 2013 ; Scoggins, 2005 ) and nutritional leaf tissue sufficiency ranges and standards ( Barnes, 2010

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Wenhao Dai and Cielo Castillo

Buddleia cultivars, B. davidii ‘Potters Purple’ and Buddleia ‘Lochinch’, from in vitro leaf tissues, which will facilitate development of a regeneration protocol for Buddleia species. Materials and Methods Plant materials Two cultivars

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W. Garrett Owen

, deficient or excessive fertility levels of essential nutrients can influence plant growth and induce deficiency or toxicity symptomology, thus compromising the overall plant quality. Greenhouse growers often rely on leaf tissue analyses ( Krug et al., 2010

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Tekan S. Rana, Erick D. Smith, Cain Hickey, and Mark Hoffmann

Spiers, 2001 ; Milholland, 1991 ; Olien, 1990a , 1990b ; Stringer et al., 2008 ). Fig. 1. A commercial muscadine vineyard at budbreak (A). Whole leaf tissue samples (B). Fruit clusters of muscadine cultivars Carlos (C) and Noble (D). Muscadines

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W. Garrett Owen

. Optimum fertilization requirements ( Biernbaum and Morrison, 2000 ; Scoggins, 2005 ) and nutritional leaf tissue sufficiency ranges and standards ( Biernbaum and Morrison, 2000 ; Bryson and Mills, 2014 ) for the genera Heuchera are limited. Bryson and

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Russell Galanti, Alyssa Cho, Amjad Ahmad, and Javier Mollinedo

( Stephenson and Cull, 1986 ). Leaf N declines in the spring during active growth and flowering and is lowest during late summer. Analysis of leaf tissue for nutrient concentration is the accepted method to assess the nutritional status of macadamia crops

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W. Garrett Owen

substrate pH of five sedum ( Sedum sp.) species, Zheng and Clark (2013) reported species-specific effects for plant growth and leaf tissue P, potassium (K), Mg, Ca, Mn, Cu, Fe, Zn, and B concentration of plants grown in peat-based substrates amended with

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Judson S. LeCompte, Amy N. Wright, Charlene M. LeBleu, and J. Raymond Kessler

determined at experiment termination. RDW and SDW were determined at each harvest. Recently matured leaf tissue samples were collected from SDW samples of three plants per treatment per species at experiment termination and analyzed for tissue macronutrient

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David R. Bryla and Bernadine C. Strik

fertigation by drip in commercial production systems. The article also contains updated standards for leaf tissue testing of northern highbush blueberry that were developed from a recent evaluation of nutrients in common cultivars growing in conventional and

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Nicolas Tremblay and Yvon Perron

As plant color is often modified by nutrient status, the use of spectoradiometric properties of leaf tissues appears to be a promising tool for quick and inexpensive diagnosis of crop fertility problems. This study was conducted to examine spectral variability associated with celery cultivars. Seedlings of Florida 683, Matador, Utah 5270, and Ventura were grown in a growth chamber for 10 weeks (transplant stage; TS). Reflectance and transmittance measurements were taken on the tallest leaf with a LI-COR LI-1800 spectroradiometer. Remaining seedlings were potted and transferred to a greenhouse for another 8 weeks (mid-growth stage; MS). Transmittance was established as the parameter most suitable to distinguish cultivars. Maximum F ratio was obtained at λ = 630 mn at TS, while there were two peeks (λ = 470 and 60 mn) at MS. A discriminant function was based on λ = 470; 630 and 670 mn correctly classified cultivars more than 8 times out of 10 at TS, and more than 7 times out of 10 at MS. Further studies should focus on the induction of nutrient deficiencies and the potential interferences of cultivars with their diagnosis.