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Catherine S.M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Abbreviations: EC, electrical conductivity EC a , EC of the applied solution; EC e , EC of a saturated medium extract; ET, evapotranspiration; LF, leaching fraction; LR, leaching requirement; M a , mass of pot after irrigation when at container

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Catherine S.M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Abbreviations: EC, electrical conductivity; EC a , EC of the applied solution; EC e , EC of a saturated medium extract; ET, evapotranspiration; LF, leaching fraction; LI, leaching intensity; LR, leaching requirement; M a , mass of pot after

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Jeff B. Million and Thomas H. Yeager

routinely conducted to account for changing production conditions (e.g., growth flushes, pruning, spacing), then LF testing can help account for variability in water needs throughout the container nursery. Routine leaching fraction testing coupled with

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Jeff B. Million and Thomas H. Yeager

. Effect of irrigation practice and target leaching fraction (LF) (10%, 20%, or 40%) on measured LF with Viburnum odoratissimum in 36-cm-diameter containers (Expt. 1). Irrigation rates remained fixed (LF_FX; above) or were adjusted daily based on

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Rangjian Qiu, Yuanshu Jing, Chunwei Liu, Zaiqiang Yang and Zhenchang Wang

.0% to 60.8% in the EC iw of 1.6–7.0 dS·m −1 , compared with the EC iw of 0.9 dS·m −1 . Table 1. Effects of irrigation water salinity (EC iw ) and leaching fraction (LF) on yield parameters and water use efficiency (WUE F ) of hot pepper using two

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James S. Owen Jr, Stuart L. Warren, Ted E. Bilderback and Joseph P. Albano

application rate, but were affected by leaching fraction (LF) and P source. Tyler et al. (1996) decreased effluent P content by 58% when growing Skogholm cotoneaster ( Cotoneaster dammeri Schnied. ‘Skogholm’) in a pine bark substrate with a low (0.0 to 0

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Rangjian Qiu, Zaiqiang Yang, Yuanshu Jing, Chunwei Liu, Xiaosan Luo and Zhenchang Wang

0.17 and 13 DAT in the LF of 0.29. Table 1. Dynamics of mean values of plant height (cm) under varying irrigation water salinity levels (EC iw , dS·m −1 ) and leaching fractions (LFs), and the output of the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with

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William R. Graves, Sandra R. Anfinson and Kathryn K. Lappegard

Scotch laburnum [Laburnum alpinum (Mill.) Bercht.], Amur maackia (Maackia amurensis Rupr. & Maxim.), and Chinese wisteria [Wisteria sinensis (Sims) Sweet] were inoculated with compatible rhizobia and treated with leaching fractions (LF) of 0, 0.2, and 0.4 using fertilizer solutions with 3.6 and 10.7 mol N/m3 for 10 weeks. LF did not affect plant dry mass, leaf area, or stem length. Growth was higher among plants provided 10.7 mol N/m3, but only plants provided 3.6 mol N/m3 formed root nodules. We conclude that growth is not reduced by eliminating leaching during the first 10 weeks of seedling development, and that application of 10.7 mol N/m3 prevents nodulation of these species.

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Catherine S. M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Single-pinched `Yours Truly' geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) were greenhouse grown in 15-cm diameter pots. They received constant liquid fertigation with a modified Hoagland solution #1 at 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 strength. The 1.0 strength Hoagland solution contained 210 mg/L NO3-N and 31 mg/L P. Leaching fractions (LFs) were 0, 0.2 and 0.4. The total P applied via fertigation ranged from 33 mg at 0 LF and 0.25x Hoagland to 407 mg at 0.4 LF and 1.5x Hoagland. The leachate P concentration ranged from <5 mg/L to -60 mg/L. The P concentration in the recently matured leaves was in the acceptable range for all treatments. We were able to recover 90 to 99% of the applied P by analyzing the shoots, soilless medium, and leachate. Only 4% of the recovered P was in the leachate for plants receiving 0.5x Hoagland and a 0.2 LF. However, these plants were equal in yield to plants receiving higher fertigation rates and higher LFs.

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Catherine S.M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Geranium `Yours Truly' in 15-cm diameter plastic pots were greenhouse-grown as single pinched plants in a completely randomized design. Plants were irrigated with 300 mg/liter N from 20N-4.4P-16.6K with leaching fractions (LF) of 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4. There were 24 irrigations during the 8-week study. Plants with LF of 0.2 and 0.4 had 46% greater leaf area, 40% greater top fresh weight, and 37% greater top dry weight than plants with LF of 0 and 0.1. By week 5 the leachate electrical conductivity (EC) for LF of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 had increased from about 3 dS/m initially to 12, 8, and 4 dS/m, respectively. At harvest, medium ECe was 7, 4, 3, and 2 dS/m for LF of 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4, respectively. At harvest, medium pH was the same in the top, middle, and bottom thirds of the pot. At harvest medium ECe with LF of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 was 47, 68, and 60% lower in the bottom two-thirds of the pot than in the top third. With a LF of 0 the medium ECe was not lower in the bottom of the pot. Minimizing the LF for potted geraniums substantially reduced plant growth.