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Deborah C. Smith-Fiola and Robert G. Way

The landscape/nursery/turfgrass industry is the largest agricultural industry in New Jersey, as well as one of the highest users of pesticides. In the lawn-care industry alone, more than 906,000 lbs of active ingredient of pesticides was used in 1990. Landscape Integrated Pest Management (LIPM) tactics have been commercially proven to reduce pesticide usage; however, adoption of LIPM has been slow. In 1993-94, a survey of 425 landscape contractors, arborists, groundskeepers, nurserymen, and turfgrass professionals was taken to determine attitudes toward adoption of LIPM tactics. Business changes, marketing, customer perceptions, educational needs, and attitudes toward alternative control tactics were assessed. Results show that the majority of landscapers are interested in LIPM for personal reasons, to reduce their own contact with pesticides. Contractors favor pesticide products that are cost effective and proven as opposed to environmentally “safe.” Concerns inhibiting LIPM adoption include potential customer dissatisfaction, recovering monitoring costs, and inadequate control. Challenges lie ahead in pest identification and control education, marketing programs, delays in profits, and writing bids.

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M.P. Garber

Marketing techniques were valuable in the development of an extension and research support program for the diverse Georgia nursery industry. The support program was developed in three stages: 1) needs assessment and development of industry alliances, 2) initiation of a research program based on priority needs, and 3) technology transfer. The needs assessment was facilitated by the development of a distribution channel map for the Georgia landscape/nursery industry. The industry alliances developed early in the project facilitated conduct of the research program and technology transfer. The research component was identified from an informal needs assessment and qualitative information on industry relations inferred from the distribution channel map. The research results support the contention that landscape architects have a significant influence on demand for nursery crops and that nursery operators should treat this group as important customers. The focus for technology transfer is improved marketing procedures and more efficient working relationships between nursery operators and landscape architects. This includes development of new alliances at the industry/association level, improved marketing practices for nursery operators, and positioning extension publications to benefit multiple industry segments.

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Michael S. McCoy, Kathleen M. Kelley, and Dan T. Stearns

rate from 2002 to 2003 ( Associated Landscape Contractors of America, 2004 ). The survey was commissioned by the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) and conducted by Harris Interactive (Rochester, NY) using the Harris Poll online database

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J. P. Mahlstede

Abstract

John P. Mahlstede was raised in the horticulture business. His father, John A. Mahlstede, is a nurseryman and landscape contractor in Cleveland, Ohio.

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Charles R. Hall, Alan W. Hodges, and John J. Haydu

This research was made possible by a grant from the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Committee of the U.S. Forest Service, along with funding from the American Nursery and Landscape Association (ANLA) and the Associated Landscape

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Wesley P. Judkins

Abstract

The opportunities for blue collar workers in horticulture are real and expanding. Alert educators appreciate the need for skilled personnel to perform the many specialized tasks in this important agricultural field. Some of the more common positions include plant propagator, golf course or park maintenance foreman, horticultural research technician, landscape foreman, landscape contractor, landscape gardener, garden center or flower shop manager, greenhouse grower or foreman, orchard or vegetable production foreman, packing shed managers, and nursery or seed company shipping superintendents. Many other positions could be cited.

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Dennis R. Pittenger, Donald R. Hodel, and A. James Downer

Successful reestablishment of transplanted palms [members of the Arecaceae (Palmae)] depends on rapid regeneration of roots, avoiding injury and desiccation of the trees during transit and handling, and maintaining sufficient soil moisture around the root balls after transplanting. Since landscape contractors and nurserymen spend considerable resources and labor transplanting specimen palms, understanding the seasonality of palm root growth, how palm roots respond when trees are dug, and the effects of canopy manipulation during transplanting will enable them to adopt effective and rational transplanting practices. This manuscript provides a review of research findings that can be applied to maximize reestablishment of transplanted specimen palms.

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M. A. Powell

A very successful project at N. C. State University began in 1983, with the first N. C. Landscape and Turfgrass Field Day. The Field Day is co-sponsored with the N. C. Landscape Contractors Association and the Turfgrass Council of North Carolina. The Field Day is an excellent opportunity for industry to visit with faculty and observe research projects and extension demonstrations. Over the years the attendance has grown to over 1200 paid attendees. The Field Day is actually divided into four separate functions: 1) Educational Field Day, 2) Product and Equipment Field Day, 3) Turf Workshops, and 4) Construction Workshops. The Extension and Research projects benefit financially from this endeavor. Any projects from the Field Day are given back to the University. This typically is about $4000.00. The Field Day is held the third Wednesday in May, rain or shine.

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Kerrie B. Badertscher

Colorado currently has no licensure program for landscaping and many people applying to the Colorado Master Gardener program have indicated a desire to seek entry-level training in order to determine if a second career in horticulture is feasible. Alternatively, some each year who complete this basic training go on into the Green Industry either in basic design and/or maintenance. Colorado State University Cooperative Extension came together with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and the Colorado Nursery Association (now CNGA) to create the Rocky Mountain Landscape Design Guide. The purpose of this publication was to inform the general consumer about the landscape design process. A review will be given using this publication with concurrent laboratory activities to Master Gardeners as a continuing education piece.

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MA. Powell

The North Carolina Landscape Contractors Association and the North Carolina Association of Nurserymen have cooperated with the NCSU Horticulture Department Extension Landscape Specialist in providing study resources, a demonstration garden, training seminars, and workshops to the landscape and nursery industry. The Certified Plant Professional Program certifies nursery and garden center employees on plant identification and ornamental plant care. Over 350 woody ornamentals, herbaceous perennials, and annuals are in the study guide. A total of 893 folks have been certified since the program began in 1986. County agents teach classes on a regional level. Three tests are given annually. The Certified Landscape Technician's exam is given annually, after many workshops and training sessions are offered. The professional standards of the industry are being improved by the results of the networking with the industry associations.