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Preeti Sood, Chris Ference, Jan Narciso and Ed Etxeberria

Laser labeling has become an alternative means of fruit labeling in many areas of the world (e.g., New Zealand, Australia, and Pacific Rim countries), approved in others (e.g., South Africa, Mexico, Canada, Argentina, Chile, and the European Union

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Craig S. Charron, Steven J. Britz, Roman M. Mirecki, Dawn J. Harrison, Beverly A. Clevidence and Janet A. Novotny

Isotopic labeling of plants is a powerful strategy for studying metabolic processes. Plant compounds that have incorporated isotopic labels are distinguishable from their unlabeled analogs by mass spectrometry, and therefore can be traced in

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Arend-Jan Both, Bruce Bugbee, Chieri Kubota, Roberto G. Lopez, Cary Mitchell, Erik S. Runkle and Claude Wallace

of Energy has developed a Lighting Facts® label that most manufacturers now incorporate on their packaging. These labels ( Fig. 1 ) include the following information: power consumption (watts), light output across the visible spectrum (lumens

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Benard Yada, Phinehas Tukamuhabwa, Bramwell Wanjala, Dong-Jin Kim, Robert A. Skilton, Agnes Alajo and Robert O.M. Mwanga

( Hwang et al., 2002 ; McGregor et al., 2001 ). With the fluorescently labeled microsatellite primers and sequencing on automated sequencers such as the ABI 3730 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA), multiplexing of many polymerase chain reaction (PCR

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Madiha Zaffou and Benjamin L. Campbell

nursery/greenhouse firms operate on “thin profit margins” ( Sturdivant, 2013 ), it is important to understand how local labeling and the intrinsic value, if any, associated with an outlet type (i.e., home improvement center/mass merchandiser vs. nursery

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Mary Lamberts and Adrian Hunsberger

Many people, including growers and gardeners, fail to carefully read pesticide labels before each use because they assume they know what the label contains. The UF Miami-Dade County Extension pesticide trainer developed several hands-on exercises where participants had to find information on labels chosen for specific features. The first group was people taking the Core/General Standards training. Five pesticide labels were used. Participants were asked to find information from three different categories: 1) basic information used for record keeping and about the product;2) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Precautionary Statements; and 3) additional product information such as irrigation and tank mix warnings. A second group, Private Applicators (growers and their employees), studied 6 labels (1 overlap with Core training). They were asked information that focused on Worker Protection Standard issues, resistance management, limits on number total amount applied, and pre-harvest intervals. For both types of licensed applicator training, participants were divided into groups of 5 to 6. On several occasions, growers and other licensed applicators said they thought labels should have greater uniformity regarding location of key information. Master Gardeners (MGs), the third group, were first given three general publications on labels and 1 on protecting the applicator. They then received labels of four homeowner products and were guided through finding information such as: labeled crops/sites, pests controlled, signal words, mixing instructions, preharvest intervals and replant information. MG knowledge was evaluated with a five-question quiz. All participants commented that they learned a lot about reading labels.

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W.R. Okie, W.R. Joyner and T.G. Beckman

Large field plantings are often difficult to label and to plant randomly. A DOS computer program was developed in SAS and BASIC to randomize lists of experimental factors and print sorted paper labels to apply to trees or plants. Tagged trees can be resorted readily by block or row to speed planting. The computer lists are useful for plot verification and subsequent data collection, especially if data are collected and inputted directly to a computer. Copies of the programs are available from W.R. Joyner if a formatted diskette and self-addressed mailer are supplied.

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B. Rosie Lerner

The general public is in need of education regarding the responsible use of pesticides in home gardens. A 1990 California survey indicated that many individuals never read product labels and do not follow safety precautions when applying pesticides. A 1991 EPA study found that the most frequently detected pesticide in well water was a breakdown product of DCPA, a commonly used herbicide on home lawns. A 1988-89 National Gardening Survey found that 39% of US households purchased pesticide products. Excerpts of a video tape titled “Read the Label”, which specifically targets the home gardening audience, will be presented. Because the subject of pesticide safety may be of little intrinsic interest to gardeners, actors were hired to lend a bit of light humor. Highlights feature Gordon Guardian, the Gardening Angel, who comes to Earth to guide Beth Homeowner through the proper selection, use. hazards, storage, and disposal of pesticides. Production methods, funding and budgeting of the video will also be discussed.

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Samuel G. Obae, Mark H. Brand and Richard C. Kaitany

authenticate their trueness-to-name. The plants collected from Michigan retail outlets originated from 35 different nurseries across the United States. In total, 274 samples representing 20 different cultivars based on container labels were collected. Once the

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Ribo Deng and Danielle Donnelly

Labeled (`“C) compounds were recovered from tissue disks taken from 14CO2-fed leaves of l-year-old greenhouse-grown plants and l-month-old ex vitro transplants of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) by hot (boiling in 80% ethanol immediately after 14C exposure), delayed-hot (boiling in 80% ethanol after a 2- to 3-day ethanol soak), and room-temperature (RT) (2-to 3-day soak in 80% ethanol) extraction methods. The RT extraction method was simple but as effective for extracting 14C-labeled compounds from red raspberry leaf tissues as hot and delayed-hot extraction methods.