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Heather L. Papinchak, E. Jay Holcomb, Teodora Orendovici Best and Dennis R. Decoteau

the effectiveness of using common foliage houseplants in reducing concentrations of ozone within a simulated indoor environment. Materials and methods Plant material and growing conditions. Three plants species, snake plant, spider plant, and golden

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Jennifer S. Doxey, Tina Marie Waliczek and Jayne M. Zajicek

The main objective of this research was to investigate the impact of plants within a university classroom setting on course performance and on student perceptions of the course and instructor. The study was designed to include a minimum of two classes of the same coursework taught by the same professor in the same room during one semester. Three sets of two classes each and 385 students were included within the study. Throughout the semester, the experimental class of students was treated by including an assortment of tropical plants within the classroom. Plants were not present in the control classroom of the study. The official university course and instructor evaluation survey was administered at the end of the semester. Additionally, each student provided demographic data, including class rank, gender, and ethnicity. To measure course performance, the professor for each course reported each student's grade for the course. No statistically significant differences were found in comparisons of grades/student course performance (P = 0.192). However, statistically significant differences were found in comparisons of overall course and instructor evaluation scores of treatment and control groups (P = 0.065). Statistically significant differences were found in comparisons of the individual courses/classrooms between control and treatment groups on statements in subsections of the course and instructor evaluation survey, including the areas of “learning,” “enthusiasm (of instructor),” and “organization (of instructor).” In these comparisons of the treatment and control groups, the differences that were most apparent were in students who had class in the classroom that was windowless and stark. The plants appeared to have the greatest impact on students in the room that was void of other natural elements.

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Jennifer Doxey and Tina M. Waliczek

Many individuals and businesses enhance the central design of their homes or offices with living interior plants. While the aesthetic values of interior greenery are obvious, some research has suggested that interior living plants may offer some psychological and restorative values, such as reduced tension, better coping mechanisms, and increased concentration and attention. The main objective of this research was to investigate the impact of plants within a university classroom setting on course performance, course satisfaction, and student perceptions of the instructor. The study was designed to include a minimum of two classes of the same coursework, taught by the same professor in the same room. Three sets of two classes each, and ≈500 students were included within the study. Throughout the semester, the experimental class of students was treated by including an assortment of tropical plants within the classroom. Plants were not present in the control classroom of the study. A survey administered to each classroom of students at the end of the semester asked students to provide demographic data including class rank, gender, and grade point average. The professor for each course provided information on each student's grade for the course, as well as overall quantitative information on how well students were satisfied with the experience they had within the course. The results demonstrate value added to the classroom experience and help to justify consideration of the added expense of interior plants in meeting the goals of instructor and curriculum.

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Claudia C. Collins and Angela M. O'Callaghan

individual with unique circumstances, and that the class would as much as possible meet their specific needs. Week 2. Students were instructed in the basics of houseplants, such as transplanting and care. Each student selected his or her own plant to

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Le Luo, Yichi Zhang, Yingnan Wang, Tangren Cheng, Huitang Pan, Jia Wang and Qixiang Zhang

leaves blooms fully in July and August, with a maximum florescence life of 60 d. It is tolerant to shade and drought, so it can be acclimatized easily to indoor environments. Therefore, gesnariad shows great potential as foliage and a flowering houseplant

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Jon T. Lindstrom, Gregory T. Bujarski and Brent M. Burkett

Buddleja indica Lam. is encountered frequently as a houseplant or a conservatory specimen and is attractive ornamentally for its oak-shaped foliage. Buddleja indica, a tetraploid African species, 2n = 76, was crossed to the Asiatic tetraploid species B. davidii Franch. The F1 generation was intermediate in foliage character between the two parents. Flowers of the F1 were either white or light lavender in color and the number of flowers per inflorescence was intermediate between the parents. The F1 plants were fertile. These hybrids might be suitable for greenhouse or container culture due to their attractive foliage and floral display.

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Carol Ness, Leslye Bloom, P. Diane Relf and Mary Miller

Horticulture information is being placed at the fingertips of Virginia citizens through the use of Public Information Interactive Video Systems. A personal computer (with a touch-screen monitor) and laserdisc player work together to offer a multi-media delivery system. The user moves through programs by simply touching the screen to browse, skip ahead, back up, look up specific information, and print out needed information. A program on household plants contains photographs and information on 131 popular cut flowers and houseplants. A program on selecting landscape plants includes short video segments on the plant selection process, a plant sorter, picture album, and information on the 141 trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers. Horticulture questions are among those answered in a section on questions most often asked of extension agents. This horticulture information program is one of the top two programs used in the Public Information Interactive Video System in Virginia.

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Carol Ness, Leslye Bloom, P. Diane Relf and Mary Miller

Horticulture information is being placed at the fingertips of Virginia citizens through the use of Public Information Interactive Video Systems. A personal computer (with a touch-screen monitor) and laserdisc player work together to offer a multi-media delivery system. The user moves through programs by simply touching the screen to browse, skip ahead, back up, look up specific information, and print out needed information. A program on household plants contains photographs and information on 131 popular cut flowers and houseplants. A program on selecting landscape plants includes short video segments on the plant selection process, a plant sorter, picture album, and information on the 141 trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers. Horticulture questions are among those answered in a section on questions most often asked of extension agents. This horticulture information program is one of the top two programs used in the Public Information Interactive Video System in Virginia.

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Kris-Ann E. Kaiser and Patrick N. Williams

Ferry-Morse Seed Company is trying to market worm castings to their customers. Murray State University was asked to compare different percentages of worm castings for use with both bedding plants/vegetables and houseplants. Recommended application rates for worm castings was not to exceed 30%. Two plants were chosen to represent the plant categories deemed important to the consumer: tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum `Rutgers') and spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum). Treatment percentages for worm castings were 0% for a control and 10%, 20%, and 30% were incorporated into a soilless media substrate. Treatment 1 consisted of worm castings/soilless media alone and Treatment 2 consisted of worm castings/soilless media with the addition of Peters Professional All-Purpose 20–20–20 fertilizer at 100 ppm nitrogen. Tomatoes were grown from seed and the spider plant propagules were harvested from greenhouse stock plants and sized into small, medium, and large depending on weight. Tomatoes were harvested at 6 weeks and spider plants at 10 weeks. All tomatoes in Treatment 1 had poor visual consumer quality. Visual quality for Treatment 2 tomatoes was best in 20% and 30%. No significant differences were found in Treatment 1 regarding shoot and root weights. Treatment 2 showed significant differences in dry and fresh weight between the control and 20% and 30%. There were visual quality differences with spider plants in Treatment 2 and also significant differences in shoot and root weights between control and all percentages of worm castings in Treatment 2. Based on plant performances, a recommendation to Ferry-Morse Seed Company was to market worm castings in conjunction with a regular fertilizer schedule for maximum plant quality.

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alternative practices were substantially more than for use of the conventional herbicides. Houseplants Reduce Indoor Ozone Air Pollution Papinchak et al. (p. 286) evaluated three common indoor houseplants for their effectiveness in reducing ozone