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Fredric Miller and Susan Uetz

Horticultural oil and insecticidal soap were as effective as conventional insecticides and miticides in controlling a variety of sap-feeding insects and mites on common greenhouse crops. Neem extract (Margosan-O or Azatin) was less consistent and provided intermediate to good control of a variety of sap-feeding insects and mites on common greenhouse crops. Except for purple heart (Setcreasea purpurea K. Schum. & Sydow) and wax ivy (Hoya carnosa R. Br.), repetitive sprays of horticultural oil, insecticidal soap, and neem extract (Azatin) did not seem to cause any noticeable phytotoxicity or effect the growth of 52 species or cultivars of bedding plants and 13 species of foliage plants examined in this study. Repetitive sprays of horticultural oil and insecticidal soap significantly affected plant height and final quality of some poinsettia cultivars evaluated in this study.

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Carlos R. Quesada and Clifford S. Sadof

-derived fatty acid with long carbon chains ( Weinzierl, 2000 ; Yu, 2015 ). Horticultural oils have a narrow distillation range that allows them to be applied on leaves with reduced phytotoxic effects ( Agnello, 2002 ; Cranshaw and Baxendale, 2005 ; Weinzierl

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J.T. Moody and M.C. Halbrooks

The ornamental horticulture industry in South Carolina has expanded significantly over the last decade. Today, concerns regarding environmental and public health, and stricter regulations of pesticide use, are creating incentives for growers to evaluate alternative methods of pest control. Nursery producers currently use an array of chemicals in an attempt to control pests including insects, weeds, and diseases. Integrated pest management (IPM) provides an opportunity to reduce chemical reliance. The overall objective of this extension program is to collect and collate information relevant to the implementation of an IPM program. The first year, 1989-90, surveys were developed to determine key factors related nursery pest management. Types of data collected included: key pest species; pest-plant relationships; grower action responses to pest problems; types and frequency of pesticide use. The second year, 1990-91, involved implementing IPM strategies such as: cultural methods; use of horticultural oils, soaps, and lower risk pesticides; and spot treatment applications to help maintain pest populations below economically damaging levels. Improvements in pest management included; reduced chemical applications, reduced associated environmental risks, and maintenance of aesthetic quality of plants.

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Raymond A. Cloyd

in that they control a narrow-spectrum of arthropod pests compared with conventional pesticides. Examples of alternative pesticide groupings include insect growth regulators, insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, selective feeding inhibitors, and

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Paolo Sabbatini and G. Stanley Howell

95 100 Eichhorn, K.W. Lorenz, D.H. 1977 Phö enologische Entwicklungsstadie. Der rebe. Nachrichtenb Deutsch Pflanzenschutzd (Braunschweig) 29 119 120 Finger, S.A. Wolf, T.K. Baudoin, A.B. 2002 Effects of horticultural oils on the photosynthesis, fruit

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Baldev Lamba and Grace Chapman

operation at the Landscape Arboretum at TUA. As an alternative to chemical pesticides and fertilizers, horticultural oils and soy-based fertilizers were used as much as possible. Most of the vegetables and herbs were grown from seed in our greenhouses

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Augusto Ramírez-Godoy, María del Pilar Vera-Hoyos, Natalia Jiménez-Beltrán, and Hermann Restrepo-Díaz

.D. McKenzie, C.L. Osborne, L.S. 2017 Compatibility and efficacy of Isaria fumosorosea with horticultural oils for mitigation of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Insects 8 4 119 Lezama-Gutiérrez, R. Molina-Ochoa, J. Chávez

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Morgan L. Cromwell, Lorraine P. Berkett, Heather M. Darby, and Takamaru Ashikaga

neem oil. Agnello et al. (1994) found horticultural oils applied for mite control under conditions of high temperature and moisture stress caused foliar lesions, mainly in the portions of the canopy where the spray had dried unevenly or had

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William C. Kreuser and Frank S. Rossi

foliar fertilization Crit. Rev. Plant Sci. 28 36 68 Finger, S.A. Wolf, T.K. Baudoin, A.B. 2002 Effects of horticultural oils on the photosynthesis, fruit maturity, and crop yield of winegrapes Amer. J. Enol. Viticult. 53 116 124 Hay, R.K.M. Porter, J

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Sheng Li, Feng Wu, Yongping Duan, Ariel Singerman, and Zhengfei Guan

Kumar, V. Avery, P.B. Ahmed, J. Cave, R.D. McKenzie, C.L. Osborne, L.S. 2017 Compatibility and efficacy of Isaria fumosorosea with horticultural oils for mitigation of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Insects 8 119 Li