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Zai Q. Yang, Yong X. Li, Xiao P. Xue, Chuan R. Huang, and Bo Zhang

Wind tunnel tests were conducted in an NH-2-type wind tunnel to investigate the wind pressure coefficients and their distribution on the surfaces of a single-span plastic greenhouse and a solar greenhouse. Wind pressures at numerous points on the surfaces of the greenhouse models were simultaneously measured for various wind directions. The critical wind speeds, at which damage occurred on the surfaces of single-span plastic greenhouses and solar greenhouses, were derived. To clearly describe the wind pressure distribution on various surface zones of the greenhouses, the end surface and top surface of the plastic greenhouse and the transparent surface of the solar greenhouse were divided into nine zones, which were denoted as Zone I to Zone IX. The results were as follows: 1) At wind direction angles of 0° and 45°, the end surface of the single-span plastic greenhouse was on the windward side, and the maximum positive wind pressure coefficient was near 1. At wind direction angles of 90° and 180°, the entire end surface of the single-span plastic greenhouse was on the leeward side, and the maximum negative wind pressure coefficient was near −1. The maximum positive wind pressure on the end surface of the single-span plastic greenhouse appeared in Zone IV at a wind direction angle of 15°, whereas the maximum negative pressure appeared in Zone VIII at a wind direction angle of 105°. 2) Most of the wind pressure coefficients on the top surface of the plastic greenhouse were negative. The maximum positive and negative wind pressure coefficient on the top surface of the plastic greenhouse occurred in Zones I and II, respectively, at a wind direction angle of 60°. 3) At a wind direction angle of 0°, the distribution of wind pressure coefficient contours was steady in the middle and lower zones of the transparent surface of the solar greenhouse, and the wind pressure coefficients were positive. At a wind direction angle of 90°, the wind pressure coefficients were negative on the transparent surface of the solar greenhouse. A maximum positive wind pressure coefficient was attained at a wind direction angle of 30° in Zone IX, whereas the maximum suction force occurred in Zone VII at a wind direction angle of 135°. 4) The minimum critical wind speeds required to impair the single-span plastic greenhouse and solar greenhouse were 14.5 and 18.9 m·s−1, respectively.

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R. Rankin and D. L. Creech

Horticultural enrollments have fallen since the late 1970's and faculties are scrambling to find new ways to creatively finance educational and outreach programs. The Stephen F. Austin State University Arboretum was sanctioned by the administration in March, 1987. Eight acres of land that lie on LaNana creek are directly associated with the Agriculture building and horticultural facility. Gardens that feature a wide range of rare, unusual, and untested landscape plants are being developed by students, volunteers, and a mix of outside monies. The history of a City/SFASU project to develop a three mile LaNana Creek trail will be described. A cooperative effort with the Herb Society of Deep East Texas, a 121-acre conservancy easement project, and Asian vegetable studies are currently under the arboretum umbrella.

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Mokhles A. Elsysy and Peter M. Hirst

and growing on M.7 rootstock. Both cultivars were planted at a spacing of 3 m × 5 m at the Samuel G. Meigs Horticulture Facility of Purdue University in Lafayette, IN. The climatic conditions of the state of Indiana can be described as a hot

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Khalil R. Jahed and Peter M. Hirst

Methods This experiment was conducted in 2013 and repeated in 2014 at the Samuel G. Meigs Horticulture Facility in Lafayette, IN, USA. Three commercial apple cultivars were used: ‘Honeycrisp’/M.7 planted in 2003, ‘Fuji’/B.9 planted in 2001 and ‘Gala’/B.9

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Mokhles A. Elsysy and Peter M. Hirst

investigation. Trees were planted at a spacing of 3 × 5 m, trained to a vertical axis form, and managed according to standard commercial practices. The orchard was located at the Samuel G. Meigs Horticulture Facility of Purdue University, Lafayette, IN. Crop

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Mokhles A. Elsysy, Michael V. Mickelbart, and Peter M. Hirst

potential (Fuji, Honeycrisp, and Golden Delicious) ( Table 1 ). All cultivars were planted with 3 × 5 m spacing at the Samuel G. Meigs Horticulture Facility of Purdue University in Lafayette, IN. Table 1. Apple trees growing in Lafayette, IN, used in this

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between the four treatments. The pot-in-pot azaleas were superior when compared to plants grown in a nearby full sun aboveground area and the 50% shade house by the horticulture facility. While not analyzed because of location differences, the pot