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Julie H. Campbell and Benjamin L. Campbell

examples of new trends that are shaping consumer expectations when making retail purchase decisions regarding green industry and nongreen industry products. Understanding how IGCs compare with home improvement centers (HICs), such as Home Depot (Atlanta, GA

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Madiha Zaffou and Benjamin L. Campbell

nursery/greenhouse firms operate on “thin profit margins” ( Sturdivant, 2013 ), it is important to understand how local labeling and the intrinsic value, if any, associated with an outlet type (i.e., home improvement center/mass merchandiser vs. nursery

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George F. Czapar, Marc P. Curry and Raymond A. Cloyd

mailing list of 977 retail stores most likely to sell pesticides for household, lawn, or garden use was generated. The list included general merchandise stores such as Wal-Mart, hardware stores such as Ace Hardware, home improvement centers such as Home

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Charles R. Hall

The green industry complex includes input suppliers (manufacturers and distributors); production firms such as nursery, greenhouse, and sod growers; wholesale distribution firms including importers, brokers, re-wholesalers, and transporters; horticultural service firms providing landscape and urban forestry services such as design, installation, and maintenance; and retail operations including independent garden centers, florists, home improvement centers, and lawn/garden departments at home centers, mass merchandisers, or other chain stores. Many current economic trends and driving forces point to the fact that the green industry is in a period of hypercompetitive rivalry due to the maturing consumer demand. A number of firms have already been forced out of the green industry during the 2008–09 recessionary shakeout period and others continue to exit. To address this issue, a workshop was organized by G. Zinati for the 2009 ASHS annual meeting entitled “Managing and Thriving in Tough Times, When Every Dime Counts!”, which was sponsored by the Nursery Crops (NUR) and Marketing and Economics (MKEC) Working Groups and the American Nursery and Landscape Association (ANLA). This lead-off workshop presentation: 1) provided an overview of current economic conditions and trends and their influence on the green industry, 2) discussed supply-side methods and technologies for controlling costs during an economic downturn, and 3) addressed proactive demand-side differentiation and pricing strategies that will not only help ensure survival, but will also better position green industry firms for competing profitably in this period of hypercompetition.

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Benjamin Campbell, Hayk Khachatryan and Alicia Rihn

purchasing at mass merchandiser/home improvement centers and nursery/greenhouse garden centers, we used a two-limit tobit model developed by Rossett and Nelson (1975) . A pollinator-friendly plant purchasing value was obtained by asking survey respondents

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Charles R. Hall and Dewayne Ingram

landscape and urban forestry services such as design, installation, and maintenance; and retail operations including independent garden centers, florists, home improvement centers, and lawn/garden departments at home centers, mass merchandisers, or other