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Paul M. Lyrene

Spain. These cultivars are used to produce berries for the export market that can be harvested 1 month or more before high-chill cultivars grown in colder areas. Some low-chill highbush blueberry cultivars are also adapted to evergreen production in

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Sridhar Polavarapu

A common practice in highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) culture is to use combinations of insecticides and fungicides to reduce the number and cost of pesticide applications. In response to apparent phytotoxicity observed in commercial fields that were treated with combinations of diazinon and captan formulations, phytotoxicity of two formulations of diazinon (Diazinon AG600 and Diazinon 50W) and captan (Captan 80WP and Captec 4L) was investigated on highbush blueberries during 1997 and 1998. Phytotoxicity injury similar to injury observed in commercial fields was reproduced in treatments with diazinon and captan mixtures in all experiments. The Diazinon AG600 and Captec 4L mixture was the most severe and caused significantly more phytotoxic-ity to fruit and leaves than individual treatments of Diazinon AG600, Captec 4L or untreated control. Separation of diazinon and captan applications by 8 h significantly reduced phytotoxicity compared to mixture treatments. Injured fruit and leaves recovered over time and most treatments showed only a mild injury at the time of harvest. Phytotoxicity on fruit and leaves caused by Diazinon AG600 and Captec 4L mixture was significantly affected by application date with the earliest application causing the greatest injury. These data indicate that diazinon and captan mixtures cause phytotoxicity on highbush blueberries and therefore the two should not be applied in combination.

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Anna K. Kirk and Rufus Isaacs

( Prunus armeniaca L.), cherry ( Prunus avium L.), peach [ Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], pear ( Pyrus communis L.) ( Anstey, 1966 ), and sunflower ( Helianthus anuus L.) ( Goyne et al., 1977 ), but this has not been accomplished for highbush blueberry

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Patricio A. Brevis, Nahla V. Bassil, James R. Ballington, and James F. Hancock

The blueberry is a recent major fruit crop to be brought under cultivation; improvement through breeding and selection did not begin until 1909 ( Coville, 1937 ). The primary gene pool of blueberry consists of three species, highbush blueberry

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John R. Yeo, Jerry E. Weiland, Dan M. Sullivan, and David R. Bryla

Phytophthora cinnamomi is a highly virulent root rot pathogen of highbush blueberry and is present in most growing regions worldwide ( Strik and Yarborough, 2005 ; Zentmyer, 1980 ). Symptoms of infection include poor shoot growth, root necrosis

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Jeffrey G. Williamson and D. Scott NeSmith

reported on CPPU effects on southern highbush blueberries. The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of several southern highbush cultivars to applications of CPPU under greenhouse and field conditions. Materials and Methods This

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt, Allan W. Stretch, Nicholi Vorsa, and Arlen D. Draper

'Hannah's Choice' is an early-ripening, tetraploid, highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) that was developed by the cooperative breeding program of the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (NJAES). It was named because it represents an improvement in sweetness, firmness, and flavor over currently grown early cultivars.

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William Sciarappa, Sridhar Polavarapu, James Barry, Peter Oudemans, Mark Ehlenfeldt, Gary Pavlis, Dean Polk, and Robert Holdcraft

,720,000 highbush blueberry market in New Jersey. ( Joshua, 2006 ). Future gains in this emerging agribusiness segment are promising through the “organic certification” process. This USDA-certified organic designation appeals to today's consumer as an even higher

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Paul M. Lyrene

, it has a wide, deep root system, which makes the plants drought-tolerant, and it can grow well on soils of higher pH than any species in section Cyanococcus . Cultivated highbush blueberries require acid soil and have shallow, fibrous roots that

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James W. Olmstead and Chad E. Finn

Highbush blueberry production passed the 1-billion-pound mark for the first time in 2012 ( Brazelton, 2013 ). From 2010–12, there was a near equal split between highbush blueberry fruit sent to fresh or process markets ( Brazelton, 2013 ). Until