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Kassim Al-Khatib, Robert Parker and E. Patrick Fuerst

This study evaluated the response of rose to different herbicides applied as simulated drift. Chlorsulfuron {2-chloro-N-[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]benzenesulfonamide}, thifensulfuron {3[[[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]-2-thiophenecarboxylic acid}, bromoxynil(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile), 2,4-D[(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid], glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine], and a combination of 2,4-D and glyphosate were applied over the top of established rose plants at 1/3, 1/10,1/33, and 1/100 of the maximum labeled rate for grains. All herbicides injured rose. The greatest injury was from chlorsulfuron and 2,4-D, and the least injury was from bromoxynil and glyphosate. Plants recovered from the injury caused by all treatments except for the highest rates of chlorsulfuron and 2,4-D, which continued to show significant injury at the end of the growing season. Although all herbicides had characteristic symptoms, some of these were very similar to those caused by other stresses. Therefore, because of the potential ambiguity of visual symptoms, any allegation about herbicide drift should be based on a report of all symptoms and should be supported by residue analysis.

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Jayesh B. Samtani, John B. Masiunas and James E. Appleby

In 2004 and 2005, potted white oak seedlings 0.6 m in height were treated with six herbicide treatments at three concentrations, 1/4, 1/10, and 1/100× of the standard field use rate. These herbicides and their standard field use rate of active ingredient (a.i.) included 2,4-D at 1.5 kg/ha, 2,4-D + glyphosate at 0.8 kg/ha + 1 kg/ha, acetochlor + atrazine at 3.5 kg/ha, dicamba at 0.7 kg/ha, glyphosate at 1.1 kg/ha and metolachlor at 2.0 kg/ha. The seedlings were treated at three growth stages: swollen buds, leaves unfolding, and expanded leaves. A compressed air spraying chamber delivering 187 L/ha was used to apply the herbicides. After treatment, the containers were placed in an open field plot in a completely randomized design. Oak seedlings were most susceptible to herbicide injury at all concentrations, at the leaves unfolding stage. Symptoms on seedlings treated with 2,4-D and dicamba at the leaves unfolding stage included leaf cupping and rolling, leaf curling, leaf rolling downward from leaf margin, and unusual elongation at leaf tip. Glyphosate + 2,4-D applications resulted in leaf cupping, yellowing, leaf rolling downward from leaf margin and abnormal leaf tips. Glyphosate symptoms ranged from leaf yellowing and browning, to slight browning of interveinal leaf tissues. Acetochlor + atrazine, or metolachlor alone caused the abnormality referred to as “leaf tatters” where in severe cases, only the main veins are present with limited amounts of interveinal tissues. Detailed description of the injury symptoms, supplemented with photographs are posted on a web site: http://www.nres.uiuc.edu/research/herbicide_research/index.htm

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M. Lenny Wells, Eric P. Prostko and O. Wendell Carter

issue of herbicide drift. A large number of agronomic and horticultural crops are susceptible to injury and yield loss from drift-level exposures to synthetic auxin herbicides ( Al-Khatib and Peterson, 1999 ; Breeze and West, 1987 ; Everitt and Keeling

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Jayesh B. Samtani, John B. Masiunas and James E. Appleby

, natural areas, and residential development contribute to herbicide drift injury. Off-target herbicide movement is between 1% and 10% of field use rates ( Al-Khatib and Peterson, 1999 ; Al-Khatib et al., 2003 ). Herbicide drift modifies plant morphology

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Jayesh B. Samtani, John B. Masiunas and James E. Appleby

stressors such as adverse environments, air pollution, or pests ( Haugen et al., 2000 ). Haugen et al. (2000) and WDATCP (2003) proposed that insect feeding, environmental factors, or herbicide drift could cause leaf tatters. Our preliminary research

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Mariano F. Galla, Bradley D. Hanson and Kassim Al-Khatib

, and accidental overspray scenarios. Nonionic surfactant (Broadspread ® ; Custom Ag Formulators, Fresno, CA) was added at 1.6 fluid oz/acre to all treatments. Although not fully mimicking droplet and concentration dynamics of herbicide drift, treatments

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Lavesta C. Hand, Wheeler G. Foshee III, Tyler A. Monday, Daniel E. Wells and Dennis P. Delaney

potential for herbicide drift. Total weed coverage was visually measured as a percentage within a randomly selected 1-m 2 section of each plot on a biweekly basis for 8 weeks. Crop yield and fruit number were collected at the end of the season. Data were

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Harlene Hatterman-Valenti, Greg Endres, Brian Jenks, Michael Ostlie, Theresa Reinhardt, Andrew Robinson, John Stenger and Richard Zollinger

-resistant weedy species. Herbicide drift has been and continues to be a problem across agriculture production areas. Off-target spray drift can lead to economic losses and legal disputes among producers and applicators. In the past, the primary herbicide of

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Giuseppe Vanella, Masoud Salyani, Paolo Balsari, Stephen H. Futch and Roy D. Sweeb

Weed management in citrus orchards largely involves the application of nonselective herbicides (e.g., glyphosate and paraquat) for postemergence control ( Singh et al., 2005 ). The off-target movement of these herbicides (drift) can affect citrus

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Bryan Hed and Michela Centinari

cluster were calculated. It was not possible to repeat the visual assessment of cluster damage after MD-II, as the vines sustained herbicide drift damage. Weather data . Weather (air temperature, rainfall, and wind speed) data were recorded by an onsite