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Grant L. Thompson, Cynthia L. Haynes, and Samantha A. Lyle

for out-of-class study to show distinguishing features among plants. We sought to complement existing teaching materials, including live materials (cut, greenhouse, or field), pressed herbarium specimens, and photography with botanical scans

Open access

Andrzej K. Noyszewski, Neil O. Anderson, Alan G. Smith, Andrzej Kilian, Diana Dalbotten, Emi Ito, Anne Timm, and Holly Pellerin

populations and Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa herbarium specimens and selection of cultivars. Material and methods Historic (herbaria) reed canarygrass tissue for the pilot experiment was collected from the University of Minnesota Herbarium (Bell Museum of

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Lindsay Woodruff

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Chalita Sriladda, Heidi A. Kratsch, Steven R. Larson, and Roger K. Kjelgren

were preliminarily located from geographic coordinates taken from Utah State University (USU) Intermountain Herbarium voucher specimens of the four species. However, the putative Sphaeralcea populations were no longer present at many of the field

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William G. Hembree, Thomas G. Ranney, Nathan P. Lynch, and Brian E. Jackson

root tip collections, selected taxa were propagated and container-grown as described previously. All accessions were identified according to Zaikonnikova (1975) by Hembree. Herbarium specimens for each accession were prepared and deposited in the

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Kim E. Hummer and Andrey Sabitov

, personal communication). Fragaria vesca L. is a European introduction into this region ( Ohwi, 1965 ) and is not native to Sakhalin, Hokkaido, or the Kurile Islands. Staudt (1973 , 1989) studied a Japanese herbarium specimen and seedlings of

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Donald G. Huttleston

Abstract

During 1986, 15 cultivar names in unassigned woody genera were registered. Ten of these were dwarf spiraeas. During 1987, eight cultivar names in unassigned woody genera were registered. Herbarium specimens and photographs of the plants will be deposited in the U.S. National Arboretum Herbarium. Anyone who is involved in the origination or introduction of new cultivars of ornamental plants is urged to see that they are registered with a view toward nomenclatural stabilization. A list of International Registration Authorities is avalable from the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta (AABGA), P.O. Box 206, Swarthmore, PA 19801.

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Norman E. Pellett and Kim E. Brainerd

Abstract

Forsythia is a popular plant for the landscape in many regions of the northern hemisphere. Inadequate cold hardiness of flower buds often results in few spring flowers on most cultivars in northern regions. Forsythia mandschurica Uyeki has flowered every year since 1970 at the University of Vermont Horticultural Research Center (3). This species is described in Chinese language with a plate of herbarium specimens and a plant distribution map (2).

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Robert J. Rouse, Paul R. Fantz, and Ted E. Bilderback

Japanese cedar, Cryptomeria japonica (Thunb. ex L.f.) D. Don [Cupressaceae Bartling, formerly assigned to Taxodiaceae Warm.] is increasing in popularity as a landscape plant in the eastern United States. A taxonomic study of cultivars grown in the eastern United States was conducted. Forty-five cultivars were recognized. Each cultivar bears synonymy, a quantitative morphological description newly described from field data, herbarium vouchers, references to original literature and observational notes. A glossary of taxonomic terms relevant to Cryptomeria is presented. A taxonomic key is presented for segregation of cultivars that should assist professional plantsmen in identification of taxa cultivated in the eastern United States.

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M. M. Thompson

Seeds and herbarium specimens of 47 accessions from 11 Rubus taxa native to the Andean Region of Ecuador were collected in October and November 1990 and deposited at the USDA/ARS Germplasm Repository in Corvallis, OR. Plants will be grown from these seeds and evaluated for taxonomic identity and potential breeding value. Characteristics of the plants will be discussed. Taxa obtained include: R. adenothallos Focke, R. acanthophyllus Focke, R. bogotensis Kunth, R. coriaceus Poiret, R. glabratus H.B.K., R. glaucus Benth., R. robustus C. Presl., R. roseus Poiret, R. urticifolius Poiret. These taxa will contribute unique genes to the improvement of Rubus crops by breeders throughout the world. Seeds may be requested from the curator, USDA/ARS NCGR-Corvallis.